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FT ideas for improving air security

FT ideas for improving air security

 
Old Sep 11, 01, 9:06 pm
  #1  
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FT ideas for improving air security

As frequent flyers, we may be in a better position to spot security loopholes than others. Yet we may keep silent because usually better security means longer waits or more chances of delays.

Could we contribute suggestions here to consolidate into a single list to present to the FAA?

Randy, as a 'public figure' who is often quoted in the media, and is seen to represent frequent flyers could credibly present the list to the authorities with some weight.

My suggestions are to do away with AA's self checkin kiosks (which I really like) and their telephone checkin. Both negate good ID verification since the kiosks only need a FF card or credit card, which are easily obtained or stolen. The telephone check in only requires an elite FF card. which again could be stolen.
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Old Sep 11, 01, 9:22 pm
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I am sorry, but do you really think there is anything that could have stopped todays attacks?

ID ? They either could care less if we know who they are, or they had fake ID. It is easy to get, ask any teenager.

Bags under your control? If you are ready to die for your cause, does it matter?

Scanners, searches? Anyone could craft a knife out of many common items. At the risk of being a security risk, just look at the items in our carryon bags and see how many things could be a knife? To say nothing about the 'stuff' that is part of the airplane.

Other than opening the door and pusing these idiots out, I am at a loss. But of course, we will implement all kinds of security starting tomorrow.

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Old Sep 11, 01, 9:43 pm
  #3  
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Just trying to be constructive.

Security must be a system, not a collection of individual checks, whether for ID or weapons. However, just as a chain is only as strong as its weakest link, a security loophole obviates the rest of system.

I'm just suggesting we plug those loopholes. The government may choose to implement even more such as the air marshals who used to fly back when hijackings seem to occur weekly and even daily.
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Old Sep 12, 01, 8:45 am
  #4  
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US airports are so lax in security when compared to major cities overseas.

One of the things I'd recommend is having to go through security twice beginning right at all entrances to the airport. So many airports in Europe have this. Make everyone go through security with their luggage to be carried on AND checked in.

Nobody should even be walking inside an aiport without having gone through security.
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Old Sep 12, 01, 10:02 am
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Allow access to the gates only with a ticket.

Apart from that, I guess the curbside check-in will be discontinued by most if not all airlines.
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Old Sep 12, 01, 10:27 am
  #6  
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Although the flying public would bear the cost via higher fares, etc, I think the domestic Sky Marshal program bears consideration. Money well spent...

------------------
Take a deep breath, and remember what's really important...
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Old Sep 12, 01, 11:01 am
  #7  
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Secure the cockpit.
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Old Sep 12, 01, 12:31 pm
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A few key things
-security checks at the gate itself (Changi airport in Singapore for example)

-pass through security at every airport,even when connecting

-hire real security personnel instead of the half wits who can't spell their name on their name tags correctly.

-I think luxuries such as curbside check-in, telephone check-in, etc. will be a thing of the past from now on.

-I think the US gov't should issue federal ids-passports should be required for all passenger regardless of whether domestic or international travel. No more licenses issued in 1972 in Vermont should be accepted

Things will be very different from now on when we fly but it will be worth it to prevent anything remotely similar to yesterday's incident.
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Old Sep 12, 01, 1:07 pm
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Train the pilots and FAs in self-defense techniques. A trained person should be able to disarm someone armed with a knife or box cutter.

Put a "dead pedal" of sorts into effect for the cockpit. If the pilot doesn't perform a specific routine every 15-20 minutes or so, the plane is presumed hijacked and can be dealt with accordingly, which could include scrambling a military aircraft to make and maintain contact and though I hate to say it shoot or force the plane down if it threatens inhabited areas.

Install a system in the cockpit that would simultaneously put the a/c into uninterruptible autopilot mode and advise ground control of a hijacking. This would permit the pilots to abandon the cockpit if necessary while effectively maintaining control of the craft.

I am just angry about this. These filthy terrorists took an innocent means of transportation and turned it into guided missile. That is one of the worst things about the whole story.

Mike
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Old Sep 12, 01, 3:27 pm
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Remember that existing security measures are mostly intended to protect the passengers not targets on the ground.

Most immediate measure is to expand sky marshalls and alter response tactics in the air. Then harden cockpit doors.
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Old Sep 12, 01, 4:00 pm
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The Secretary of Transportation, Norm Mineta, is giving a press conference. He has stated two new measures that will become effective now.

1. No more hotel or alternate location check-in's for flights.

2. Only ticketed passengers will be allowed around the boarding area of a flight.
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Old Sep 12, 01, 7:38 pm
  #12  
 
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<font face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif" size="2">Originally posted by CA Platinum:
The Secretary of Transportation, Norm Mineta, is giving a press conference. He has stated two new measures that will become effective now.

1. No more hotel or alternate location check-in's for flights.

2. Only ticketed passengers will be allowed around the boarding area of a flight.
</font>
Could someone somewhere explain to me how the two measures above, along with no parking within 200 ft of a terminal will have any impact on incidents like the one this week.

Why do we keep responding with actions that will not have any impact? (except on us)

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Old Sep 12, 01, 7:53 pm
  #13  
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<font face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif" size="2">Originally posted by Mikey likes it:
-snip-

Put a "dead pedal" of sorts into effect for the cockpit. If the pilot doesn't perform a specific routine every 15-20 minutes or so, the plane is presumed hijacked and can be dealt with accordingly, which could include scrambling a military aircraft to make and maintain contact and though I hate to say it shoot or force the plane down if it threatens inhabited areas.

Install a system in the cockpit that would simultaneously put the a/c into uninterruptible autopilot mode and advise ground control of a hijacking. This would permit the pilots to abandon the cockpit if necessary while effectively maintaining control of the craft.

-snip-
Mike
</font>

These are both great suggestions, and extremely do-able with current technology. I would add the lock-in of autopilot should be able to be activated by the crew using a personal "Secureid" method from multiple locations in the aircraft (galleys, lavs, etc.).

It's time to start thinking about security in the new century, not the 1970's hijackings to Cuba. And we're still flying similarly designed devices. It's time for "star trek" countermeasures like intruder alerts and auxillary controls.

NOT "no carry on bags" and silly stuff like that.
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Old Sep 12, 01, 8:20 pm
  #14  
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<font face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif" size="2">Originally posted by NoStressHere:

I am sorry, but do you really think there is anything that could have stopped todays attacks?

</font>
1. Secure the cockpit, and keep the door opening to an absolute minimum. Serve the coffee, meals etc on the ground. Relief pilot gets in and out as quickly as possible, and as long as no one is loitering near the front.

2. In the event of a hijacking or other threat, don't open the cockpit door(no matter what is happening on the other side).

3. Land as soon as possible.

Now some may say that when the Captain steps out to go to the washroom that someone could get in, but I can't imagine that a grown man couldn't hold off another grown man long enough to close the door again.

The rules have changed, it was always assumed in the past that hijackings could end peacefully. Follow the hijacker's instructions and it would be over when they got want they wanted.

I just don't see how the "peaceful outcome for a hijacking" mindset can exist anymore.

If terrorists know that there is no tolerance to demands and nothing to be gained from hijacking a plane, they look for other ways to get their cowardly message across.
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Old Sep 13, 01, 12:02 am
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Skymarshals are fine, but what about insisting that any foreign carrier flying into North American airspace also have skymarshals on board.

bj-21.
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