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-   -   Australia Tourist Entry for Child when one Parent is Deceased (https://www.flyertalk.com/forum/oceania-australia-new-zealand-south-pacific/1948361-australia-tourist-entry-child-when-one-parent-deceased.html)

MomandSon Dec 31, 18 1:56 pm

Australia Tourist Entry for Child when one Parent is Deceased
 
Hello,

In July 2019, I will be traveling to Australia with my 13 year old. We fly into Sydney where we will stay for four days. Next, we will fly to Papua New Guinea for six days. Then, we will fly to Cairns where we will stay for seven days.

I have looked for child visa requirements and see there is a Form 1229 for the non-traveling parent to sign consent. However, I can't find anything on one parent traveling with child when other parent is deceased.

My plan is to obtain the Electronic Travel Authority plenty of time in advance to our trip. I will also bring my child's certified birth certificate, and my son's father certified death certificate. I want to assume this will be sufficient for proper entry into Australia, however, I want to make sure. I don't want to have any problems at the entry.

Does anybody know the proper entry for us, or know where on Australia's government's website I could find this information.

Thanks!

Mwenenzi Dec 31, 18 2:08 pm

The Australia's government's website has a lot of links. Or phone the Australian consulate.

You will also need to check the requirements for PNG (a separate country)


CPMaverick Jan 1, 19 3:42 am

It would be helpful if you stated you and your son's citizenship/passport as that can make a difference.

Assuming he has a qualifying passport, you can apply for an ETA visa for your child. The form 1229 specifically states it is not for use with an ETA or eVisitor, so if you are going the ETA route, you don't need it.

I've never entered Australia with a child and I am not a lawyer. But my interpretation is that form 1229 is for unaccompanied children. If you are traveling with your son, and both apply for ETAs which are approved, you should not have any issues.

MomandSon Jan 1, 19 3:13 pm

Thank you both for the responses!

I reside in the U.S.A.

Best!

docbert Jan 3, 19 2:31 pm


Originally Posted by CPMaverick (Post 30594371)
But my interpretation is that form 1229 is for unaccompanied children.

Form 1229 is for when not all people with custody of a person under 18 are traveling with them. ie, if both parents share custody, and only one of them is traveling with the under-18, then the other needs to provide approval. In theory this is done to reduce the risk of a parent kidnapping a minor and taking them to a country where the other parent can't get access to them.

In this case, only one parent has custody, so technically this form isn't needed. What's more, it's not needed for an ETA, only a visa.

That said, the immigration officials still have the ability to question and detain people if they believe a minor is being transported without proper parental consent, and it's a good practice when travelling anywhere internationally to have at least a letter of consent from the non-traveling parent, or something else to show that the approval from another parent isn't required. In this case, that would likely take the form of a copy of the birth certificate and the death certificate as previously mentioned, or some other official paperwork showing that only the one parent has custody of the minor. Odds are it won't be needed, but it might - and remember that a <16 year old non-Australian can NOT use the SmartGates, so you are going to end up taking to an immigration official during entry.

MomandSon Jan 3, 19 2:54 pm

Thank you, docbert!


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