Go Back  FlyerTalk Forums >
Reload this Page >

Destinations

America - USA

New York City

OMNI NYC apartment search clinic

OMNI NYC apartment search clinic

Old Dec 20, 18, 4:03 pm
  #1  
FlyerTalk Evangelist
Original Poster
Hilton Contributor Badge
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: IAH
Programs: DL DM, AC 50K, Hyatt Ist-iest, Starriot Platinum, Hilton Diamond
Posts: 11,765
OMNI NYC apartment search clinic

I know we have lots of NYC residents on here, so hoping you can give me some suggestions here. I've received a job offer that would have me moving to the city, and assuming we cross the last couple of T's I'll be accepting it and starting late January. The office is in Midtown East so I'm trying to figure out the best place to live. I'm most familiar with the east side, Midtown up to Yorkville basically. I don't know much about and have never stayed on the West side. Budget would probably be ~$2k/mo and coming from Houston, if I could squeeze a few extra sq ft out of the apt choice, I'd appreciate it. I'd really rather to have my own place and not deal with roommates or anything.

I've fiddled around with padmapper.com a bit to look at places and it seems that in my budget, that could get me a decent sized (relatively) 1/1 up near East Harlem, while closer to the office would be more of a studio/1 situation. What are some good resources for NYC apt hunting? I'd be making a trip up there in early January to scope out a place in person.
krazykanuck is offline  
Old Dec 20, 18, 5:12 pm
  #2  
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Programs: UA AA MR HH B6
Posts: 1,402
I'd be surprised if you find anything under 2k in manhattan that's decent size. If space is important you'll have to look to the outer boroughs. there's no secret sauce here (or if you run across one, let me in on it)......have to call the various realtors. Perhaps try to hit a few open houses while you're in town.

if you're midtown east, you want to be somewhere around the 4,5,6 train lines, or the 7 if near grand central, or E or M if near 53rd but other trains if higher up.
closetasfan is offline  
Old Dec 20, 18, 6:16 pm
  #3  
Suspended
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: Orlando, FL Area
Programs: Delta SkySponge ExtraAbsorbent, SPG Gold
Posts: 29,987
A realtor that specializes in rentals may be a good option. They sometimes have connections with owners and property managers who may give them incentives.
readywhenyouare is offline  
Old Dec 20, 18, 8:13 pm
  #4  
FlyerTalk Evangelist
 
Join Date: Nov 2002
Location: ORD
Posts: 13,594
If you are still negotiating your relocation package, ask them to pay the broker fees for an apartment search. WE moved to NYC in 2011 and Mr. Gfunk's company paid for everything. Our broker (who was top notch - let me know if you want an intro, not that he'd remember me) figured out quickly what we wanted and drove us around to see apartments in a big black SUV. Realtors and apartment brokers in NYC are worse than sharks. It's a super cutthroat world.

We wound up at 215 E 96 St, which at the time he said was the nicest and newest building on the UES. Also, he raved about the landlord being the Related Group - he said they were by far the most reasonable landlord in the city. They even let us charge our rent without a fee. So many credit card points...

For reference, our initial rent was $3200 for a 700 sq ft 1 br/1 ba with in unit laundry. It's a full service building - the gym even has a pool, which is rare. We moved to Long Island City when the rent hit $3600 three years later*. SPeaking of which, you should also consider Long Island City. It's kind of a hot neighborhood now, but there are lots of new apartments being built. You're one or two stops on the 7, E, M, Q, R trains to east midtown. You will probably be more likely to find something in your price range in LIC...or maybe Astoria (tons of great restaurants and maybe an extra 15 mins on the subway from midtown).

IF you would like to avoid the broker fees, spend a day taking a walk in the neighborhood(s) you're interested in. Especially if you look at staffed high rises, you can often just walk in on a weekend and ask for the rental office, who are happy to show you available units and talk pricing. If you are looking at walkups (likely in your price range) then you might need a broker.

*we now pay half that for a 2700 sq foot house on 1/4 acre
gfunkdave is offline  
Old Dec 20, 18, 11:36 pm
  #5  
FlyerTalk Evangelist
 
Join Date: May 2008
Location: San Francisco
Programs: GM on VX, UA, AA, HA, AS, SY; Budget Fastbreak
Posts: 20,111
I doubt you’ll find a studio or any solo living for 2k on your own. Use a broker. It’ll be worth the fee!
awayIgo likes this.
gaobest is offline  
Old Dec 23, 18, 11:12 am
  #6  
FlyerTalk Evangelist
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: IAD/DCA
Posts: 31,735
if any are reasonable price, Related and some larger companies allow transfers between their buildings even in different cities
Kagehitokiri is offline  
Old Dec 23, 18, 11:28 am
  #7  
FlyerTalk Evangelist
 
Join Date: Apr 2001
Location: NYC
Programs: Landry's President's Club, Marriott Silver, Awesomeness EXPLT
Posts: 18,321
Originally Posted by krazykanuck View Post
I know we have lots of NYC residents on here, so hoping you can give me some suggestions here. I've received a job offer that would have me moving to the city, and assuming we cross the last couple of T's I'll be accepting it and starting late January. The office is in Midtown East so I'm trying to figure out the best place to live. I'm most familiar with the east side, Midtown up to Yorkville basically. I don't know much about and have never stayed on the West side. Budget would probably be ~$2k/mo and coming from Houston, if I could squeeze a few extra sq ft out of the apt choice, I'd appreciate it. I'd really rather to have my own place and not deal with roommates or anything.

I've fiddled around with padmapper.com a bit to look at places and it seems that in my budget, that could get me a decent sized (relatively) 1/1 up near East Harlem, while closer to the office would be more of a studio/1 situation. What are some good resources for NYC apt hunting? I'd be making a trip up there in early January to scope out a place in person.
I would get your company to pay a broker fee as part of your relocation. There are some good values on the Upper East Side especially as you get further north.
stockmanjr is offline  
Old Dec 23, 18, 2:43 pm
  #8  
A FlyerTalk Posting Legend
 
Join Date: Mar 2001
Posts: 55,135
Here are no-fee apartment rental websites that will give you a quick dose of reality of what rents are. Use the filters for customizations.

https://streeteasy.com/no-fee-rentals/nyc
https://www.cityrealty.com/nyc/build...o-fee-rentals#
cestmoi123 and Yoshi212 like this.
Analise is offline  
Old Dec 24, 18, 12:28 pm
  #9  
FlyerTalk Evangelist
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: DEN
Programs: UA MM Plat; AA MM Gold; HHonors Diamond
Posts: 15,806
Looks like $2000 in Midtown East is about the lowest price you're gonna see.

This is representative of that price point I would guess:

https://streeteasy.com/building/5-tu...-new_york/1110

NYC sure ain't Omaha when it comes to rents...quite an eye-opener.
Bonehead is offline  
Old Dec 25, 18, 10:30 pm
  #10  
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Location: NYC
Posts: 510
IMHO, you really need a good broker, so in addition to getting your company to pay the broker's fee (which could be up to 15% of a year's rent), ask if your company has a broker or agency they usually work with.

The broker will be critical for you because 1) you have limited time and 2) you are from out of town.

The broker can help you be realistic about prices, but more importantly help you get a serious handle on the paperwork you are going to need to fill out the rental application(s) (credit reports, guarantor applications/guarantor insurance, salary letter, pay stubs, etc.) and the cashier's checks/money orders you will need for the rent, deposit, and broker fees when you go to sign the the actual lease. See this NYT guide from last summer:

https://nyti.ms/2LPr9CN

As an example, the apartment Bonehead references is in a co-op building so it's technically a sublet. It also requires more paperwork, etc. then a regular rental building. A broker can help you navigate all of that.
st1575 is offline  
Old Dec 26, 18, 12:57 pm
  #11  
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: NYC
Programs: DL PM, Marriott Gold, Hertz PC, National Exec
Posts: 6,724
Best resource to do your own research, by far, is StreetEasy (streeteasy.com). As close to comprehensive when it comes to available units as you're going to find.
cestmoi123 is offline  
Old Dec 26, 18, 1:53 pm
  #12  
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: NYC
Posts: 8,393
Agreed with the Streeteasy recommendation. Not everything is on there, but there's more on there than anywhere else and it will definitely give a good sense of pricing in any given neighborhood (if you see outliers, assume there's a very good reason for those outliers, as it's extremely rare for a listed apartment in NYC to be significantly cheaper than true comparables). Most brokers in NYC are indeed sharks, although if you can get your work to pay for one, they can sometimes be helpful, particularly if you're not looking at big full-service buildings that have their own no-fee sales staff (and if your budget is $2k, you're probably not looking at big full service buildings).

I think it'll be very difficult to find a solo home in Manhattan for $2k or less. A couple of my colleagues have kids who just finished college and they're paying close to $2k each for tiny bedrooms in shared apartments with roommates (which IMO is insane). And studio sublets in my co-op (which is generally cheaper than the surrounding neighborhood due to a burdensome application and board interview process) go for $2300-2500. If you get out into Queens or the less popular neighborhoods of Brooklyn $2k becomes feasible, though.

Note that if you ARE looking at co-op sublets, make sure you fully understand all the rules of that particular co-op. They don't just require more paperwork, but often require an up front nonrefundable application fee that can run into the hundreds of dollars, and you'll usually need to be interviewed by the co-op board, who can turn down your application (and not refund your fee) without giving you a reason. Many co-ops also have restrictions on how long sublets can last (often 2 years, although not always).
themicah is offline  
Old Dec 27, 18, 9:04 am
  #13  
 
Join Date: Feb 2013
Location: Brooklyn
Programs: Bolt Bus Rewards
Posts: 1,067
Welcome to the purgatory that is NYC real estate. But seriously, welcome.
A couple of NYC specific items.
Listings are gold to agents and are not readily shared. Streeteasy has some listings but a lot of agents have exclusives and do not advertise or share with other agents. There's no such thing as a real MLS in most on NYC for rentals or for purchases.
The renter pays all of the fees so the advice to negotiate the agents fees in your pay package is sound. As stated above, some larger buildings have in house sales teams and do not charge a fee.
Move fast. When you find something that you like, make an offer immediately.
You'll need a chunk of cash to seal the deal: first month's rent, security deposit, agent's fee, and possibly last month's rent plus whatever application fees are required.
$2k does not go very far, especially in Manhattan. Look for neighborhoods on the subway lines most convenient to work in the outer boroughs.
The L subway line's tunnel to Manhattan is shutting down for a year and a half to two years. Stay away from listings on the L. There are bargains to be had, but you can't get there from here.
Finally, good luck. You will find someplace, even if it's not perfect. As you get to know New York, you'll find the right place to move to.
themicah likes this.
AMflier is offline  
Old Dec 27, 18, 9:18 am
  #14  
FlyerTalk Evangelist
 
Join Date: Aug 2003
Location: MSY (finally); previously NYC, BOS, AUH
Programs: AA EXP, 6MM; BA GLD
Posts: 16,686
Originally Posted by AMflier View Post
Welcome to the purgatory that is NYC real estate. But seriously, welcome.
A couple of NYC specific items.
Listings are gold to agents and are not readily shared. Streeteasy has some listings but a lot of agents have exclusives and do not advertise or share with other agents. There's no such thing as a real MLS in most on NYC for rentals or for purchases.
The renter pays all of the fees so the advice to negotiate the agents fees in your pay package is sound. As stated above, some larger buildings have in house sales teams and do not charge a fee.
Move fast. When you find something that you like, make an offer immediately.
You'll need a chunk of cash to seal the deal: first month's rent, security deposit, agent's fee, and possibly last month's rent plus whatever application fees are required.
$2k does not go very far, especially in Manhattan. Look for neighborhoods on the subway lines most convenient to work in the outer boroughs.
The L subway line's tunnel to Manhattan is shutting down for a year and a half to two years. Stay away from listings on the L. There are bargains to be had, but you can't get there from here.
Finally, good luck. You will find someplace, even if it's not perfect. As you get to know New York, you'll find the right place to move to.
There are bargains in Brooklyn because of the L shutdown. But as long as youre within walking distance from the G, taking the G to the E is an easy alternative to getting to midtown east.
Blumie is offline  
Old Dec 27, 18, 6:34 pm
  #15  
FlyerTalk Evangelist
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: Brighton. UK
Programs: BA Gold / VS /IHG Diamond & Ambassador
Posts: 13,357
Ask your new boss and colleagues if they have any ideas / recommendations.

not sure if the legal position but what about an air bnb for a couple of weeks until you find something more permanent.
UKtravelbear is offline  

Thread Tools
Search this Thread