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-   -   Check-in or Carry..What would you do? (https://www.flyertalk.com/forum/milesbuzz/5764-check-carry-what-would-you-do.html)

NoStressHere Jan 19, 02 3:45 pm

I think you are making a big jump in your assumption. I too have carried this items, and they have passed them through most of the time, but decided to stop them other times. The only thing this proves is that they can NOT catch them all the time and/or with human beings as part of the process, it will never be the same.


<font face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif" size="2">Originally posted by Redhead:
TomCayman
I've taken razors (safety kind) and nail files (the pointy kind) in my carry-on (both domestic and international) several times in the last few weeks. It seems to me that some teeny tiny bit of sense is slowly coming back to security and these are now allowed.
</font>

chemist661 Jan 19, 02 9:20 pm

I usually carry on my bag. On very long trips or if I travel with someone who is an infrequent flyer, they may check their bag. I may also check a bag if I am going for a long journey. (3 weeks in Australia in Nov.)

Plato90s Jan 19, 02 10:19 pm

Nail clippers are fine if they don't have that pointy nail file at the end. Electric razors are also fine, since the blades are short.

Quokka Jan 19, 02 11:10 pm


<font face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif" size="2">Originally posted by Plato90s:
Nail clippers are fine if they don't have that pointy nail file at the end.</font>
That depends on the airport/airline/terminal/security agent/phase of moon.

I went through SYD's international terminal last week and saw a couple nail clippers get confiscated even though they lacked nail files. The pax protested but the security agents didn't care. Of course, SYD also is the same airport where they put some new signs near all the entrances. Signs that show the international "NO" symbol (the red circle with a diagonal red line through it) with a side silhouette of a pair of nailclippers inside the circle.

Even carrying clippers through security checkpoints at US airports can be a pain. As soon as their outline is spotted by the scanners, someone goes bag diving to find them and whether they have files or not. A colleague has started carrying his clippers on his keychain to speed things up.



dgordon Jan 19, 02 11:52 pm

I used to carry on whenever I could, but the two times I traveled since 9/11 I checked my luggage because I like to carry small scissors and a nail file. To avoid a possible confiscation of such, I have checked my small suitcase. My next trip is to Toronto to see family and I think they will have scissors and nail files so I might just carry on.

------------------
DtG

ryan754 Jan 20, 02 1:40 am

I have a differedn opinion, I try to check as much as I can I just carry on my small Tumi briefcase/backpack. It is soo much easier with security now. I am, the one that always has my stuff hand searched. I guess it is because the airlines cannot believe that a 19 year old has elite status and flys first class (I am referring to some agents on an AS flight the other day) With checked bags I may have to wait another couple minutes, but at least I don't have to lug them around the airport (Really helps when I have to run to the plane (SFO-IAH-MID horror story) Checking for me makes flying easier especially in NRT when I go out to town I don't want to spend 900yen to have them hold my bag!

TRESY Jan 20, 02 8:05 am

As a British person who travels to the USA I am looking forward to Airlines enforcing what is already in their rules with respect to carry on luggage. In the past it was painfully ignored by the airlines, with people (in eco) bringing on more than the permitted number of items and massively oversize and over weight.

One trip I made, I was on the plane early,and stowed away my laptop and coat in the O/H locker, with my larger case being checked in. On the plane I was asked by an FA if I would stow my laptop UNDER my feet so she coild make space for a case that was clearly oversize. I refused, politely pointing out her own airlines regulations. Her reply was " you don't have to be like that ". As it happens I had a German passenger alongside and he also said the same thing to the FA, and followed up by saying that these cases would never get past check-in in Germany. Her reply "this is not Germany!"

Oh the Airline - United

oldpenny16 Jan 20, 02 8:26 am

Tresy, yes I agree with you about US airlines and the problems with what people have been allowed to carry on board. For many years I have stayed within the rules only to see other people get away with bringing everying almost up to a Maytag washer on board.

I love to do needlework when traveling. Now that's not allowed. Nothing to cut threat and risk of having expensive sewing needles stolen and tossed.

Does anyone have any ideas how to deal with this?

kempis Jan 20, 02 8:30 am

I only have carry ons whenever I have an option. I only check in bags when I have to much to bring into the aircraft.

flowerchild Jan 20, 02 7:30 pm

I also used to take needlework to pass the time. It seems ridiculous that a baby in cloth diapers with huge diaper pins is ok, as are pieces of jewelry with really long, sharp pin backs, but not my short, blunt needles. http://www.flyertalk.com/forum/mad.gif Is there no one in authority with any common sense? http://www.flyertalk.com/forum/rolleyes.gif

[Edited for clarity: these are for needlepoint or cross stitch, not knitting needles]

[This message has been edited by flowerchild (edited 01-20-2002).]

jerry a. laska Jan 20, 02 7:56 pm


<font face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif" size="2">Originally posted by flowerchild:
I also used to take needlework to pass the time. It seems ridiculous that a baby in cloth diapers with huge diaper pins is ok, as are pieces of jewelry with really long, sharp pin backs, but not my short, blunt needles. </font>
I guess you never saw Halloween (Michael Myers) and any of a number of other horror films of lesser quality. Blunt knitting needles are a favorite weapon for screenwriters.

essxjay Jan 20, 02 8:45 pm

You're right. England and Germany are _not_ America. Americans are accustomed to different carry-on allowances than Europeans. Why slam them for it?

Goodness knows that if an American slammed a European for their lack of carry-on allowances they'd never hear the end of it.



<font face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif" size="2">Originally posted by TRESY:
Her reply "this is not Germany!"</font>

Punki Jan 20, 02 8:54 pm

We never check bags unless we absolutely must, which is almost never. Now I am even more reluctant to check bags because you can't switch flights at a connection point any longer if you have a bag checked.

That could be a nightmare if you hit bad weather or mechanical problems that prevent your original connection from a timely departure.

SFJoe Jan 21, 02 1:35 pm

My religion forbids bag-checking.

SFJoe Jan 21, 02 1:41 pm


<font face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif" size="2">Originally posted by essxjay:
You're right. England and Germany are _not_ America. Americans are accustomed to different carry-on allowances than Europeans. Why slam them for it?

Goodness knows that if an American slammed a European for their lack of carry-on allowances they'd never hear the end of it.


</font>
So true. I'm frankly puzzled by German carryon rules. I had trouble with my bag (US standard roller) in FRA--LHA made me check it because it was too deep. When I got on the plane, the overheads were plenty big enough to have held it, and there wouldn't have been room to double up two thin bags. So, as with so many other aspects of flying life these days, I ask, "what's the point?"


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