Go Back  FlyerTalk Forums > Miles&Points > Mileage Run Deals > Mileage Run Discussion
Reload this Page >

some questions on fare rules

some questions on fare rules

Old Oct 3, 22, 4:53 pm
  #1  
Original Poster
 
Join Date: Jan 2022
Posts: 12
some questions on fare rules

I have a few questions regarding fare rules. (If there is a better place for this post, please feel free to move it.)

The specific scenario that I'm looking at is a round-trip itinerary on a US-based carrier with two legs on the outbound journey and three legs on the return journey.

outbound: AAA -> BBB -> CCC
return: CCC -> BBB -> DDD -> AAA

AAA, BBB, and DDD are all cities in the continental US. CCC is in Central America. It's not important to me that BBB is the connecting point on the outbound journey, but perhaps it matters for some reason.

The outbound journey is straightforward, but the return journey is peculiar. The second leg of the return departs ~20h after the arrival of the first leg. The third leg departs ~16h after the arrival of the second leg. So, the idea is that there is an overnight stay in each of BBB and DDD during the return voyage in order to share a meal with friends that live in each of those cities and get a decent night's sleep before continuing onward.

The ITA Matrix presented this routing as an option when doing a round-trip search, but it wasn't possible to find this routing via round-trip search on the carrier's website. It was possible using multi-city search, but then the price was higher, including the base fare, so I have to assume that it didn't apply the same fare basis code. Sure enough, I was able to find that same (higher) base fare (though with a slightly different total price) by using the multi-city search in the matrix for the exact same series of flights. Weirdly, the fare basis code for the return journey was the same in both cases, but the fare basis code for the outbound journey was different (more expensive). It also wasn't possible to find this routing via round-trip search on the credit card rewards travel booking site that I intend to use (if I do end up booking the trip). However, when I called them to see if it was possible, the booking site representative was indeed able to use some sort of manual tool to achieve that routing at a price only marginally higher (by ~$19 per person) than the price shown on the matrix.

The fare rules state "originating North America - no stopovers permitted".

Q1: What is the definition of "stopover" in this context? What are the factors that can cause this definition to vary in different contexts?
Q2: What is the definition of "originating" in this context? Is there one point of origin (AAA) for the outbound journey and one point of origin (CCC) for the return journey?
Q3: If the booking goes through and gets ticketed by the carrier, am I good at that point?
Q4: More generally, how do I know whether or not a given itinerary "works" with the fare rules? Or, is that all a moot point, and the real question is simply whether or not it ends up getting ticketed?
Q5: Are there cases where the fare rules permit/prohibit something but the carrier's system has been coded incorrectly, thus preventing/allowing something that it shouldn't? What happens in such cases?
grepdashv is offline  
Old Oct 5, 22, 11:31 am
  #2  
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Programs: M&M
Posts: 930
Aaa bbb ccc ddd nobody will give you an answer. Paste in 2 ITA pictures and someone will tell you within 30 mins why that is.
JPG3392 likes this.
FrankTalk is offline  
Old Oct 5, 22, 11:49 am
  #3  
Original Poster
 
Join Date: Jan 2022
Posts: 12
matrix example

Originally Posted by FrankTalk View Post
Aaa bbb ccc ddd nobody will give you an answer. Paste in 2 ITA pictures and someone will tell you within 30 mins why that is.
Example images attached. There are other possible variations based on different flights from DFW to ORD.
Attached Images   
grepdashv is offline  
Old Oct 9, 22, 1:23 pm
  #4  
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Programs: M&M
Posts: 930
1. Anything >24 hrs is a stopover. Sometimes pure domestic US fares state >4hrs but that's specific to the US domestic market.
2. Originating is the trip origin ie first departure city.
3. Yes.
4. Correct; if it's ticketed it's either good or not but in that case it's not your problem.
5. Rarely but it's the carrier's responsibility (best examples are error fares).

Your itinerary likely used married logic which means I class was only available all the way through the journey while adding the legs separately one was likely unavailable and either broke the trip (fared separately for the legs) or simply priced in R/D/C/J.
FrankTalk is offline  
Old Oct 9, 22, 1:36 pm
  #5  
Original Poster
 
Join Date: Jan 2022
Posts: 12
Originally Posted by FrankTalk View Post
1. Anything >24 hrs is a stopover. Sometimes pure domestic US fares state >4hrs but that's specific to the US domestic market.
2. Originating is the trip origin ie first departure city.
3. Yes.
4. Correct; if it's ticketed it's either good or not but in that case it's not your problem.
5. Rarely but it's the carrier's responsibility (best examples are error fares).

Your itinerary likely used married logic which means I class was only available all the way through the journey while adding the legs separately one was likely unavailable and either broke the trip (fared separately for the legs) or simply priced in R/D/C/J.
Thank you!
grepdashv is offline  

Thread Tools
Search this Thread