Go Back  FlyerTalk Forums > Destinations > Americas > Mexico
Reload this Page >

Mexico auto insurance - "tu seguro", your insurance primer

Old Apr 17, 2013, 10:37 am
FlyerTalk Forums Expert How-Tos and Guides
Last edit by: JDiver
Please edit or add information to this wiki as necessary.

Mexican automobile insurance is a legal requirement whilst driving in México; your US, Canadian or home auto insurance will generally not serve this purpose, and your credit card coverage will likely not provide the full coverage and liability protection you need driving in México.

In México, the law is based on Napoleonic Code; there is no presumption of innocence, and drivers may be jailed until "things are sorted out" - your insurance company is your bailor. If you are thinking of driving (or renting a car) in México, please take the time to read this thread. If you have had experiences to add or updates to offer, please do so.[/COLOR]
Print Wikipost

Mexico auto insurance - "tu seguro", your insurance primer

Old Mar 2, 2012, 3:25 pm
  #1  
Moderator: American AAdvantage
Original Poster
 
Join Date: May 2000
Location: NorCal - SMF area
Programs: AA LT Plat; HH LT Diamond, Maître-plongeur des Muccis
Posts: 62,948
Arrow Mexico auto insurance - "tu seguro", your insurance primer

I was asked to make this a 'sticky" thread, and I've separated it form the original thread (which had no action since 2007, but can be read here).

The biggest questions seem to be:

Q. Do I really need Mexican auto insurance to drive in Mexico?
A. Absolutely! Liability insurance is mandatory in Mexico now; your US or Canadian insurance policy not valid in Mexico and your credit card collision protection will not provide liability coverage (nor coverage for specialty vehicles nor on dirt roads). Driving in Mexico as a foreigner without insurance can subject one to a fine of $200 US dollars; driving and becoming involved in an accident without coverage, fines start at $1,000 US dollars and can involve being detained until the issue is sorted out (you pay enough money to pay all damages, and even treatment, recovery and lost wages if there's injury involved - and can ironically include extra money to get adequate food and treatment in detention.

Q. Can I get Mexico insurance in the USA?
A. You may be able to - keep on reading.

Q. What happens if I do not have Mexico insurance and I am involved in an accident?
A. In Mexico, your insurance provider is your guarantor of bail; failure to provide proof of coverage may result in detention (AKA "Mexican jail" - yes, it's at least as bad as you imagine) until things are sorted out - and it can take time to do that.

Accidents do happen - Mexico officially registers over 500,000 traffic accidents annually, with 20,000 deaths and 750,000 injuries (Academy of Easy Driving). You think Mexico is unsafe because of crime? Drive without being aware of the challenges (e.g. at night in rural areas, in Mexico City particularly during rush hour,) and without insurance and your risk is high.

Mexico requires insurance issued in Mexico (your own country's insurance policy will not cover you in most of Mexico, with the possible exception of insurance that may cover you in border zones for short periods of time). There are agents, such as AAA and others, in the USA that are allowed to sell Mexico auto insurance.

One site states:

There are several types of damages that could happen that result in liability exposure in Mexico in relation to car accidents. The bulk is listed below:
Actual damages: Damages based on the actual value of the other person’s vehicle, plus their wages and medical expenses.

Moral damages: These equate to the United States pain and suffering damages. This is not always used in the Mexican courts but will likely add up to a quarter of the overall damages.

Various: In many Mexican courts the judges are given the option of giving out extra damages as they see fit. Depending on a case’s facts there may be an exception that leads to more damages then would otherwise stand. (Causing injuries while driving drunk or affected by medications, even if covered by prescription, would likely add quite a bit.)
Liability exposure in Mexico comes down to the two basic forms of liability. Nearly every case falls into one of these two categories- civil liability and criminal liability.

Civil liability: Civil liability usually isn’t recommended for those who are seeking damages because of the lower limits set by the courts on what a person can claim. If you are seeking maximum benefits you probably wouldn’t choose a civil liability case.

Criminal liability: In criminal liability cases the damages cannot be subject to the limits set for civil liability cases. The victim also doesn’t have the legal need to hire an attorney or not will the court appoint a free attorney - they can handle their own case if they want. (I certainly do NOT recommend this! - JD)

There is always some confusion over how much you may be liable for in a Mexican liability case (civil). Many people believe that their insurance plans will act as a safety net for nearly any problem and it just isn’t that way. In Mexico, just like any other country, a US citizen is dropping many of their rights when they leave the States. Here are the basics of what a person could and will be liable for:
• Funeral expenses
• Damage to another person’s property caused by you
• Damage to another person’s vehicle
• Medical expenses such as hospitalization and medication
• Lost wages
• Moral damages, which most likely won’t go over one fourth of the total damages
See below for a quote from "Mexico" Mike Nelson
Liability exposure is currently less then the US, which surprises most and it is on its way of changing. The actual costs of judgments in Mexico are less then the US as well! Knowing what you are liable for and what liability case is all so important when dealing with liability exposure in Mexico.
(Mexico Insurance Services)

Criminal liability would include driving under the influence (alcohol and drugs, even medicinal) - and insurance companies will generally waive their responsibility for such instances, as they might for driving under certain conditions (driving under the influence of illegal, prescription, OTC drugs or alcohol, driving off-paved roads and 4WD trails).

The kinds /varieties of specific offerings one can find in a Mexican insurance policy:
  • Responsabilidad Civil Obligatoria - daños terceros (mandatory civil liability/ third party damages - a pedestrian, a house or animal)
  • Responsabilidad Civil Voluntaria (voluntary civil liability)
  • Asistencia en viaje (travel assistance)
  • Seguro del conductor (driver's insurance)
  • Defensa Jurídica (judicial defense)
  • Robo (theft - which can be partial or total, usually only total is offered)
  • Incendio (fire)
  • Lunas / cristal (windshield and other windows)
  • Préstamo de reparación (repairs loans)
  • Defensa en Multas (fines defense)
  • Retirada del permiso de conducir (driver's license cancellation)
  • Grandes daños (major damage)
  • Daños propios (personal damages)
  • Vehículo de sustitución (replacement automobile)
  • Deducible - the all-important deductible
  • Comprehensivo - comprehensive (but check to see exactly what that means)
Partial theft (robo parcial) - rear view mirrors, tire changing equipment, hubcaps, etc. are generally never covered. Damage to the same and windows are generally never covered. When you check out a rental car, protect yourself - be sure everything is there - hubcaps, auto jack and handle, etc. and nothing is broken, dented or scratched - note it on the checkout sheet AND photograph the vehicle from every angle with your camera or cell phone, as it is highly likely you will be charged for any missing or broken items.

You will want a policy that is "all risk " (todos riesgos) that has sufficient coverage you are protected - USD $300,000 is the minimum, more is better, depending on which state you'll be driving / renting in. (required liability insurance varies by state). I would recommend for liability protection these days. (It goes without saying that every animal you kill was unique, it was about to make a television appearance and show it had a vocabulary of several hundred words and could figure complex tax forms, and every pedestrian you hit was on his / her way to becoming Mexico's greatest prodigy or neurosurgeon. Some things do not change just because you are in a different country.)

If you are thinking of driving in Mexico one site to visit is that of ex-Sanborn's Road log guru Mike "Mexico" Nelson, here. I've long corresponded with Mike (decades) and his road logs were the Sterling currency for Americans and Canadians going to drive in Mexico. He's been driving and logging the roads of Mexico (some of them more trails than roads) since 1968 - not quite as long as I have been, in my automobiles, 4WDs and VW campers, but definitely more comprehensively.

"Mexico" Mike says:

Article 502 of the Labor Law states: "In case of death, the compensation due to persons shall be the amount equal to the amount of “Five thousand {5,000} days of The General Minimum Wage or the highest Professional Minimum Wage, plus funeral expenses." [The old law was 730 days of the daily wage or about USD$47,000 per death]. This makes USD$300,000 a prudent minimum coverage and $500,000 is not excessive.
If you are going to be driving in Mexico and are thinking of insurance, Mike is out of the business now, but he's a straight shooter, offers many tips on his site and has some cogent things to say and recommendations for insurance providers on his site, including "Is Mexico safe"? (read it!) as well as

Remember: Mexican insurance companies are your guarantor / bailor if you get into an accident - and you do not want to go to a Mexican jail whilst the judicial and police authorities "sort out" who is guilty! Mexican law is based on Napoleonic Code that does not presume ininocence, not the English Common Law that does presume innocence. in Mexico, you are wholly subject to Mexican law; none of the rights you may have and rely on at home apply in Mexico.

"Mexico" Mike Nelson (Mike was the Sanborn guy for a long time, if you purchased their insurance some years ago you got his Mexico travel log as a valuable "freebie" on the side). Mike lists some good insurance companies, though perhaps not all, but he also mentions some companies are not so good, even though they might cost you more... please, read on, you will be rewarded!

I've been driving in Mexico since 1956, and gave driven extensively on everything from highways to Mexico City to very remote off-road areas, in a variety of automobiles from my old Plymouth station wagon, Toyota FJ-40 Land Cruiser, VW bus to a variety of rental cars.

I used to purchase locally - even as a US resident, I used to purchase a policy from an agency (Allen W. Lloyd y Asociados, SA de CV, which also provides a variety of investment, financial, real estate and insurance services,) Guadalajara offices that made it cheaper and more comprehensive for me to be insured, especially against "daños terceros" (third party liability). If you drive your own vehicle or drive frequently, a longer term policy may be cheaper for you than several short-term policies.

● ● ●

Last edited by JDiver; Sep 1, 2015 at 9:06 am Reason: update
JDiver is offline  
Old Apr 5, 2012, 4:11 pm
  #2  
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: WAS
Programs: enjoyed being warm spit for a few years on CO/UA but now nothing :(
Posts: 2,486
Originally Posted by JDiver
I used to purchase locally, of course - even as a US resident, I used to purchase a policy from an agency's (Allen W. Lloyd y Asociados, SA de CV, which also provides a variety of investment, financial, real estate and insurance services,) Guadalajara offices that made it cheaper and more comprehensive for me to be insured, especially against "daños terceros" (third party liability).
Great info, thank you. I visit my wifes family in Mexico and often drive their cars. Are you aware of any options for purchasing insurance as just the driver without actually owning or renting a car there?

thanks
Section 107 is offline  
Old Apr 10, 2012, 11:06 am
  #3  
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: DEN
Programs: AA EXP, UA
Posts: 58
On my two short trips to Mexico last fall, I purchased the extended liability insurance through the rental car company, Thrifty, and relied on my credit card insurance for the rest. This time I'll be down for 16 days and am looking for something more reasonable than the $17/d rental company rate.

Online one can find companies selling what appears to be comparable SLI for much less. The company I contacted, Sanborn, underwritten by ANA Compania de Seguros, is quoting $105 for $100,000US coverage, similar to the 1 million peso Thrifty policy.

Any suggestions, experiences, advice?

Thanks,
JimS
mtnjim is offline  
Old Apr 17, 2012, 6:32 pm
  #4  
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: WAS
Programs: enjoyed being warm spit for a few years on CO/UA but now nothing :(
Posts: 2,486
Originally Posted by mtnjim
On my two short trips to Mexico last fall, I purchased the extended liability insurance through the rental car company, Thrifty, and relied on my credit card insurance for the rest. This time I'll be down for 16 days and am looking for something more reasonable than the $17/d rental company rate.

Online one can find companies selling what appears to be comparable SLI for much less. The company I contacted, Sanborn, underwritten by ANA Compania de Seguros, is quoting $105 for $100,000US coverage, similar to the 1 million peso Thrifty policy.

Any suggestions, experiences, advice?

Thanks,
JimS
definitely check out "Mexico Mikes" webpage referenced above - really excellent information if you havent already. http://www.mexicomike.com/
Section 107 is offline  
Old Oct 20, 2012, 12:10 pm
  #5  
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: SJC/SFO
Programs: WN A+ CP, UA 1MM/*A Gold, Mar LT Tit, IHG Plat, HH Dia
Posts: 6,272
Rental Car Insurance in Mexico

I'll be visiting Cancun in about a month with my wife and her parents. We'll be staying at a timeshare outside of Playa del Carmen so I'm planning to rent a car to maximize our ability to get around. I have a few questions about insuring the rental car:

- What level of insurance should I plan to buy?
- Is it reasonable to buy insurance ahead of time, from an agent in the USA?
- What's a reasonable ballpark cost?

Thanks in advance.
darthbimmer is offline  
Old Oct 21, 2012, 5:43 pm
  #6  
Moderator: American AAdvantage
Original Poster
 
Join Date: May 2000
Location: NorCal - SMF area
Programs: AA LT Plat; HH LT Diamond, Maître-plongeur des Muccis
Posts: 62,948
Part II (with some redundancy)

See my post above; this query has been merged into the active thread.

AAA Mexico Insurance: I doubt you will be able to purchase Mexico auto insurance from most agents in the USA, though AAA offers insurance through Grupo Nacional Provincial / La Provincial, which used to be my company of choice in Mexico for my own auto insurance (see following). A list of Mexican insurance companies with websites is at the end of this page; though I doubt anyone reading will be using them, it's a good list and it may be your rental company offers insurance provided by one of these Mexican government licensed companies (licensed by the Comisión Nacional de Seguros).

Originally Posted by AAA
Did you know U.S. auto insurance is not valid in Mexico? In the event of an auto accident, only a Mexican automobile liability policy is accepted by local authorities.

Our Trusted Partner
AAA provides Mexico Tourist Automobile Insurance through Grupo Nacional Provincial S.A.B., one of the largest and most reputable insurers in Mexico, and offers:
• Customizable policies for your specific needs
• Flexible options including emergency medical coverage
• Convenient service: 24/7 claims filing, bilingual adjusters, repairs in the U.S.
• Financial strength and stability rated “A” (Excellent) by A.M. Best, a leading global credit rating agency
Coverage for Anyone and Any Vehicle
Both AAA Members and non-members may purchase a policy. Coverage is available for cars, pick-ups, SUVs, RVs, motorcycles, and trailers or boats in tow, and can be purchased for periods from 1 to 365 days. Get covered now.
Sanborn's Insurance: I haven't used them in a while, but Sanborn's Auto Insurance (not related to the Sanborn's shop and restaurant chain in Mexico) also sells Mexico driving insurance. You can get an online quote. See more about Sanborn's and what kind of insurance coverage they offer here, call Toll Free: 888-215-6324 or e-mail info <at> sanbornsinsurance.com.

You will normally have no problem driving with a current driver's license / licence from your home state or location, though it may be some other nationalities may do best with an International Driver's License (I have used one at times because in Mexico a traffic stop may result in the officer taking your license to the municipal offices for later retrieval - if they keep my IDL, I can depart without waiting a day or two or three and dealing with what may be a wrongful stop.

You need at least two kinds of insurance: Collision Damage Waiver (CDW or LDW) and resultant Loss of Use (seguro contra choques or colisión), which covers you for damage caused to the vehicle and loss of use fees while the car is being repaired. The rental insurance company is happy to sell you this, because they make a large profit margin on it.

You need Third Party Liability (Seguro de Responsabilidad Civil Obligatoria - means OBLIGATORY and it is! - or sometimes seguro de Responsabilidad civil para daños a terceros.) This covers you for accidents where you cause injury or damages to others, and in Mexico it is mandatory to have this insurance. The insurance company is also your bailor, and without this you can go to jail and be held (no US rights for US citizens in Mexican jails, even calling the Consulate or Embassy, or right to an attorney, much less a free one,) and be held there until fault is assigned - and if you are accused by some locals, or a local with "palanca" (leverage) you are basically a tortilla on their comal (hot plate).

You might be offered gastos medicos a ocupantes insurance - medical insurance for the vehicle's occupants - and auxilio vial (road assistance) as well.

Your credit card, for those that have credit card coverage, provides the first kind of insurance, normally not the second (liability). Failure to purchase insurance puts you at risk and is likely to result in exorbitant holds on your credit card limit. As well, you may have to pay all the bills and then submit them to your credit card when you get home.

I'd choose a reputable car rental company and go with their insurance - as it is insurance sold through their company they have a relationship with the company. That can be useful. Cover the price of the car plus the deductible you can afford, and check what is covered. In Mexico it may be difficult to cover auto glass breakage, partial theft (meaning the side mirrors, etc.) and inquire about whether the LDW / CDW includes protection for loss of use fees.

For liability, be aware if you have trouble you will be seen as a "rich gringo staying in an expensive timeshare", so be sure to have sufficient coverage to pay for the world's smartest talking donkey.

That being said, read "Mexico" Mike Nelson's article here. Mike knows Mexico, used to work with Sanborn's Insurance (which sold Mexican insurance at many US border and nearby locations). The companies he is recommending sell mostly to Americans driving their own vehicles into Mexico.

Cheap insurance will generally have a $25,000 or $50,000 liability limit. That was good enough in the 1980's, but not in the 21st century. If you hit a vehicle worth $30,000, $40,000 or $50,000, that does not leave much room for coverage, does it? Make sure you are comparing apples to apples when you compare Mexican insurance policies. You want either at least $100,000 CSL or $150,000 CSL to be safe. Do not wimp out on your insurance premium. Save money somewhere else.
He means US dollars - a Mexican liability limit of $50,000 MXP / M/N is basically a mere $3,780.

Insurance is generally NOT valid and provides NO protection if the driver is under the influence of alcohol or drugs, whether prescribed or not; the level of tolerance is very low. Coverage may also be declared invalid if the car is driven off road or on only dirt roads. Check your T&Cs from the rental agency.

Oh, and when you rent that car, check for both side mirrors, hub caps, spare tire, all tools, good tires, etc. and photograph it from all angles with your cell phone(or camera with time and date set), as well as having every dent and scrape documented and countersigned on the checksheet. Gasoline stations (Mexican government operated Pemex) will often not take credit cards - have pesos available. A small tip to the guy who fills your tank and may clean your windshield is normal, and - make sure the meter is "zeroed" before anyone begins filling your tank. As stations may nor be resupplied in time on occasion I'd recommend never letting your gas gauge go below 1/2.

That also means be smart - do not drive at night! Drive slower than in the USA, especially on two lane roads where a breakdown may be indicated by branches, or by a row of rocks - which may not be removed after the repaired car drives away, and where there are "sleeping policemen" or speed bumps, sometimes amazingly crude, high and bumpy, often but not always marked with a sign that says "topes" or with what look like black corrugations on a yellow sign. Yes, these do exist on the highway between Cancún and Cd. Chetumal / Belize; the sign may be ahead of the "topes" or right at them, and they may be painted or they may blend in with the highway surface.


The best sign says and shows "topes"

You may experience checkpoints manned by the military - stop, be cooperative and be prepared to show documents or answer questions, they are not looking for you, they are mostly drugs checkpoints. Of course if you are carrying any drugs, even a marijuana cigarette, or a firearm, expect trouble. Do not try to blow off a checkpoint - I have seen these folks shoot: fortunately the "shootee" was driving a VW bus with a rear engine, but it needed a new engine for further travel, once the driver convinced the military he was merely an idiot and not a drugs or weapons smuggler.

When approaching a narrow bridge or other obstruction, a driver will flash their lights - that is a claim to right of way, and if it's a large bus, beat up car or truck it is wise to give way. But to confuse you, sometimes drivers will flash lights to let you know there is a highway patrol ahead.

One member points out above village groups asking for money - these are most usually groups of local citizens collecting spare change for the Cruz Roja (Red Cross) or bomberos (firefighters) and the like, and generally pose no risk. If you look you are likely to see cans (often marked with a red cross) or the like. It's much like the firefighters near where I live in northern California stopping cars with boots to collect donations. Stop, smile, and give 'em a dollar or two and they will be thrilled. Hurt someone slow to get out of the way or to release a rope, and you may find yourself subject to arrest and detention. Really. At worst for assault with a deadly weapon. Can you say "carcel"? Pronounced "CAR-sell, it means jail.

If you have an accident be sure to take down the time, details of the incident, the data of the other driver(s) if any (exchange information including insurance company information) and contact your insurance company . auto rental company as soon as practical.

Vocabulary:

seguro = insurance (say-GOO-roe)
choque = crash or collison (CHOW-kay)
auxilio = help or assistance (owks-EEL-ee-owe)
llame un médico = call a doctor (YAH-may oon MEH-dee-koe)
su licencia, por favor = your license, please (sue lee-SENN-see yah pour fah-vore)

Don't get upset - remain calm, as you do not want standers by or others to escalate what may already be dramatic in their lives and scapegoat you.

(I began driving in Mexico and have driven extensively - in nearly every state - on- and off the road in Mexico and throughout Central America for over 50 years.)

Martinis at 8 offers a motorcycle insurance specialist below: http://www.mexadventure.com

List of most Mexican insurance providers:

Code:
Las aseguradoras

Agroasemex
www.agroasemex.gob.mx

Aba Seguros
www.abaseguros.com

Adventure Mexican Insurance Services (motorcycles, automobiles)
www.mexadventure.com

AIG Seguros
www.aigmex.com 

Ana Seguros
www.anaseguros.com.mx

Allianz, México, S. A. Compañía de Seguros
www.allianz.com 

Aseguradora Interacciones
www.interacciones.com

El Aguila, Compañía de Seguros
www.elaguila.com.mx

Gerling de México Seguros, S.A.
www.gerling.com.mx
www.generaldeseguros.com.mx 

Grupo Nacional Provincial
www.gnp.com.mx

HSBC Seguros
www.hsbc.com.mx

Qualitas Compañía de Seguros
www.qualitas.com.mx

Latinoamericana Compañía de Seguros
www.latinoseguros.com.mx

La peninsular Compañía General de Seguros S. A.
www.lapeninsular.com.mx

Plan Seguro
www.planseguro.com.mx

Metropolitana Compañía de Seguros
www.metropolitana.com.mx

Sanborn's Mexico Auto Insurance
www.sanbornsinsurance.com

Seguros Argos
www.segurosargos.com

Seguros Azteca
www.grupoelektra.com.mx

Skandia México
www.skandia.com.mx

Seguros Bancomer
www.bbvabancomer.com

Seguros Banorte Generali Grupo Financiero Banorte
www.banorte-generali.com.mx 

Seguros Comercial America
www.ing-comercialamerica.com 

Seguros El Potosí, S.A.
www.elpotosi.com.mx

Seguros Hir
www.hirseguros.com

Seguros Inbursa
www.inbursa.com.mx 

Seguros Metlife
www.metlife.com.mx

Seguros Monterrey NYL
www.monterrey-newyorklife.com.mx

Royal & Sunalliance, S. A.
www.royalsun.com.mx

Mapfre Tepeyac
www.mapfretepeyac.com.mx

Principal México, Compañía de Seguros, S.A. de C.V.
www.principal.com.mx

Zurich
www.zurich.com.mx

Last edited by JDiver; Jun 21, 2013 at 7:10 pm Reason: update / add
JDiver is offline  
Old Oct 22, 2012, 9:42 am
  #7  
 
Join Date: Jul 2000
Location: Sacramento, California, USA
Posts: 2,973
JDiver, you have succinctly written a superb set of posts which describe auto insurance for the typical tourist. I can't tell you how many times I've had "discussions" with friends going to Mexico about the need to have solid auto insurance and not to depend solely on "well I have my super titanium master visa express card which covers rental cars everywhere".

Can you see about making your two posts a sticky?
El Cochinito is offline  
Old Oct 30, 2012, 3:24 pm
  #8  
Moderator: American AAdvantage
Original Poster
 
Join Date: May 2000
Location: NorCal - SMF area
Programs: AA LT Plat; HH LT Diamond, Maître-plongeur des Muccis
Posts: 62,948
¡Gracias! Señor Cochinito. Done!

Originally Posted by El Cochinito
JDiver, you have succinctly written a superb set of posts which describe auto insurance for the typical tourist. I can't tell you how many times I've had "discussions" with friends going to Mexico about the need to have solid auto insurance and not to depend solely on "well I have my super titanium master visa express card which covers rental cars everywhere".

Can you see about making your two posts a sticky?
JDiver is offline  
Old Jan 31, 2013, 10:20 am
  #9  
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: IAH
Posts: 2,674
Good thread.

A lot of us in the motorcycle community use http://www.mexadventure.com/ They of course also do autos. There are testimonials over at ADVrider.com

I use them on all of my rides down into Mexico.
Martinis at 8 is offline  
Old Feb 2, 2013, 8:56 pm
  #10  
Moderator: American AAdvantage
Original Poster
 
Join Date: May 2000
Location: NorCal - SMF area
Programs: AA LT Plat; HH LT Diamond, Maître-plongeur des Muccis
Posts: 62,948
Thanks for the great tip! I knew some folks who rode to Mexico every winter from the midwest US - I should have though to ask them.

I'll add it to the OP.

Originally Posted by Martinis at 8
Good thread.

A lot of us in the motorcycle community use http://www.mexadventure.com/ They of course also do autos. There are testimonials over at ADVrider.com

I use them on all of my rides down into Mexico.
JDiver is offline  
Old Feb 4, 2013, 8:19 am
  #11  
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: IAH
Posts: 2,674
Originally Posted by JDiver
Thanks for the great tip!...
No problemo ^

Any questions feel free to ask. Planning another ride for a couple of months down the road. Real de Catorce.
Martinis at 8 is offline  
Old Feb 11, 2013, 9:10 pm
  #12  
Moderator: American AAdvantage
Original Poster
 
Join Date: May 2000
Location: NorCal - SMF area
Programs: AA LT Plat; HH LT Diamond, Maître-plongeur des Muccis
Posts: 62,948
Real de Catorce / Wirikuta? Are you joining the Huichol marakames on their annual hunt?

Originally Posted by Martinis at 8
No problemo ^

Any questions feel free to ask. Planning another ride for a couple of months down the road. Real de Catorce.
JDiver is offline  
Old Feb 13, 2013, 4:52 pm
  #13  
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: IAH
Posts: 2,674
Originally Posted by JDiver
Real de Catorce / Wirikuta? Are you joining the Huichol marakames on their annual hunt?
No!
Martinis at 8 is offline  
Old Nov 6, 2014, 11:21 am
  #14  
 
Join Date: Nov 2014
Posts: 1
Great forum.

Hello.

This forum is really helpful for people who want to drive to mexico.

Definitely you need mexico car insurance..., this because if you are involved in an auto accident and you don't have money to pay for the damage, you could spend time in jail.

About safety, I think mexico is very large and not all states are dangerous.

Here 2 Tips that can give you when you drive in mexico.
- Dont travel alone.
- Dont travel at night.

Greetings.

Last edited by JDiver; Nov 6, 2014 at 12:32 pm Reason: redacted commercial referral link
jakedi is offline  
Old Dec 26, 2014, 4:51 pm
  #15  
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: SJC/SFO
Programs: WN A+ CP, UA 1MM/*A Gold, Mar LT Tit, IHG Plat, HH Dia
Posts: 6,272
I'm a US citizen traveling in Mexico and looking to rent a car. I'm trying to figure out what insurance is mandatory, what insurance is merely worth considering, and what insurance is probably just a sham.

In reading articles across several different sites I have found conflicting answers. For example, this article from the San Francisco Chronicle -- http://www.sfgate.com/mexico/mexicom...ow-3787891.php -- states that mandatory liability insurance is, by law, already included in the basic price quoted. Yet other sites advise that you should expect to see it added as a $20/day (US) item at the time you sign the contract.

Of course, this is just for basic liability insurance. The stuff that is mandatory. I am aware there are other types of insurance which are not mandatory but are worth considering. I'm just looking to sort out what's actually mandatory-- for a car rented in Mexico, not for a car from the US driven into Mexico as much of the information upthread seems to pertain to-- and what isn't. Input greatly appreciated!
darthbimmer is offline  

Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Manage Preferences - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service -

This site is owned, operated, and maintained by MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. Copyright © 2024 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Designated trademarks are the property of their respective owners.