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Requirements for visiting Mexico 🇲🇽 as a tourist (FMM, "tourist card", visa, etc.)

Requirements for visiting Mexico 🇲🇽 as a tourist (FMM, "tourist card", visa, etc.)

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Old Feb 11, 18, 3:22 am   -   Wikipost
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The immigration requirements herein apply particularly to US Citizens and residents, though Canadian requirements are similar and listed in a following post (#6). Citizens of other countries should use the TIMATIC link below to determine entry requirements for Mexico; TIMATIC is what the airlines use to see if you have met the entry requirements of your transit and destination countries (and whether you will board or not).

Most visitors are issued "Forma Migratoria Múltiple para Extranjeros", abbreviated "FMM" or often called "TOURIST CARDS", valid for UP TO 180 days (but check how many days you are given by the admitting immigration officer). You must retain the portion returned to you and turn it in upon leaving México. Lose it and you will be delayed (required to fill out paperwork) and fined.

These requirements could theoretically change at any time; please check with the INM link shown below, as this thread may not be up to date and relied upon for specific Mexican government requirements, though the OP will attempt to keep it up to date. PLEASE READ THE OP THOROUGHLY.

See this official page to learn what you can, and can not, import into Mexico
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Old Jul 6, 12, 11:29 pm
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Moderator: American AAdvantage, Mexico, Technical Support and Feedback, The Suggestion Box and Talkboard Topics
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Arrow Requirements for visiting Mexico 🇲🇽 as a tourist (FMM, "tourist card", visa, etc.)

Mexico changed some requirements and the new visitor form (actually "Forma Migratoria Múltiple para Extranjeros", abbreviated "FMM" - replaces the "FMN" and "FMT" forms) for tourists in 2011, so this thread will attempt to provide the most recent information (written July 7 2012 and updated 17 Feb 2013). Your additions, corrections, etc. are of course welcome. I will attempt to add further information (e.g. vehicles, firearms, etc.) as I have time.

This information is for those visiting Mexico as a TOURIST only; it does not apply for those travelling to Mexico for remunerative business or resident status (Residente Inmigrado) as these are beyond the scope of the post (though at this time, those who are pursuing business interests but not remunerated in Mexico fall under the same rubric). Also, please do perform due diligence - I am not posting in any official capacity, so please check for more current or superseding information.


RESOURCES:

Extensive LIST of those countries whose nationals do not need a visa to visit México for tourism, transit or business purposes. (Those from El Salvador, Jamaica or Malaysia do not need visas but DO need a "consular seal" from a Mexican Consulate or Embassy prior to arrival - beyond scope here.)

TIMATIC via United Airlines

IATA TIMATIC (more comprehensive input, less comprehensive output).

INM Instituto Nacional de Migración, México's National Institute of Immigration. English version, though not consistent throughout site.

Link to PDF color instructions in English for FMM and FEM (for Americans and Mexicans).

Programa Viajero Confiable (Mexico's Trusted Traveler program, available to Mexican citizens and U. S. members of Global Entry)


DEFINITIONS:

INM states a tourist is visiting for

"Actividades de recreo, salud, culturales, artísticas o deportivas no lucrativas y no remuneradas. Tránsito por México hacia un tercer país..."

"Recreational, health, cultural, artistic or sport activities, not for profit and not remunerated. Transit through México to a third country..."

(My addition: The same requirements also apply to those on business as long as they are not paid / remunerated in Mexico).

REQUIREMENTS:

Citizens and permanent, legal residents of the US and Canada:

● As January 8th 2007 all US and Canadian citizens will need a passport for their Mexico visit; if a USA resident, your resident (so-called "Green Card" in US) card and passport will be required. (A drivers license and birth certificate are no longer valid forms of identification for a visit to Mexico when travelling by air.) If you arrive at your departure airport without a current valid passport with at least 6 months remaining from your date of entry, to match the 180 day maximum period your FMM is normally valid for, your airline may deny boarding. (Those arriving by ground may use a birth certificate with raised seal of authentication AND photo identification), but if by air passport only.

● Prior to or during your flight you should be given given two forms to fill out - one for Immigration (FMM or "Tourist Card" - be sure to fill out both sides) and another for Customs (Customs Declaration Form). The ~$20 fee is normally paid by your airline if you are flying on and is included in your ticket price. It will speed up everyone's passage if you complete these before you land. However, if you don't receive the forms on the flight, extra copies are always available in the Mexican port of entry (POE) airport (they may be in Spanish).

● Alternatively, one an print out the online version of the FMM and take it with you. NOTE: You MUST print the form's two pages back-to-back. Printing the form as two pages will invalidate your existing form and require you to fill out a new form on arrival.

English language version of the form:
https://www.inm.gob.mx/fmme/publico/en/solicitud.html

Overview page (in Spanish):
https://www.gob.mx/inm/articulos/fmm...aerea?idiom=es

● This FMM is valid for up to 180 days, multiple entries (a major change form the old FM-T). The FMM is occasionally made out for 90 days, but you may request and be granted 180 days. If you receive less than the time you expect to stay in Mexico at your POE, you can usually extend it at a local government office, but it can be a hassle. You must depart Mexico by the end of the 180th day unless you secure an extension in Mexico.

I recommend proactively asking for the 180 day stamp when arriving at the POE if you think there is a chance you might need it, regardless of the length of intended stay - nobody can predict... and though normally the tourist document is to be collected on departure, it's actually difficult to turn in if you are returning by cruise or land, yet there seem to be no repercussions for it. (However, do NOT lose the paper slip - if departing by air, if you do not have it you will likely be required to take a delay and pay some money before being allowed to proceed.)

Land entry / northern border areas under 72 hours: You are required to have an FMM ("Tourist Card" to enter Mexico other than remaining within designated border areas (within 20 miles of the border) for less than 72 hours, OR within that area longer than 72 hours or travel beyond the border areas for any length of time. If you are crossing in car, foot, etc. you must pay a bank (usually Banjército) the fee, have the form stamped and then take it to Migración for a final stamp activating the FMM.

● On arrival in Mexico, the authorities will retain half of the form. Do not misplace the portion of the FMM returned to you; you will need to produce this again for on your departure from Mexico and if you lose it it can cause problems*, fines (~$25) and delays. (In fact, authorities at borders you cross by vehicle or foot may not request the form, but you are required to have it in your possession.)

The authorities may request proof of solvency - this may be cash, credit card, return or onward ticket, etc. and though it not usually requested, they may legally require it - or / and a return or onward ticket (see below TimaticWeb quote).


INM Form FMM (expect some colour variation; may also be in Spanish)


Back of form (for official use only)


Spanish version for comparison (You may get one of these at the POE airport; ignore source information above form)


IF YOU ARE NOT AMERICAN CITIZEN OR RESIDENT, BUT HAVE A VISA FOR THE USA:

From the website of the Mexican Consul General in Miami:

TOURIST, TRANSIT AND BUSINESS VISA

Welcome to the Visa's Department of the Consulate General of Mexico in Miami, Florida.
In order to better serve you please read carefully the outlined instructions.

IMPORTANT CHANGES TO MEXICAN VISA REQUIREMENTS STARTING MAY 1ST, 2010

With the purpose of simplifying and promoting traveling to Mexico, starting May 1st, 2010:

All foreign visitors who travel to Mexico as tourists, on business, or in transit to another country will not require a Mexican visa, regardless of their country of citizenship, as long as they have a valid passport and a valid US visa (which must be presented before Mexican Immigration authorities at the Port of Entry). (BUT those from El Salvador, Jamaica or Malaysia must have a consular seal on arrival.)

*Requirements for foreigners who do not travel to Mexico as tourists, on business or in transit remain with no change.

TIMATIC :

Originally Posted by TIMATICWEB
/ / 16FEB13 / 2315 UTC

National USA (US) /Embarkation USA (US)
Destination Mexico (MX)

Passport required.
- Passport and/or passport replacing documents must be valid
on arrival.
- Warning: if departing from the USA (regardless of any
destination passport exemptions), a valid passport and/or
accepted departure document For details, see TIMATIC
for what is required by the US immigration authorities.

Visa required, except for A max. stay of 180 days:
- for holders of normal passports issued to nationals of USA;

Minors:
- Passport not required for alien minors (up to/incl.17 years
of age) registered in their parent/guardian passport,
provided travelling with the passport bearer.
- All minors under 14 years of age, when travelling alone,
should be met by an adult.

Mexico (MX)
Vaccinations not required.

Recommended:
- Malaria prophylaxis. Malaria risk - almost exclusively in
the benign (P. vivax) form - exists throughout the year in
some rural areas that are not often visited by tourists.
There is moderate risk of transmission in some localities in
the states of Chiapas and Oaxaca; very low risk-localities
are also found in the states of Chihuahua, Durango, Nayarit,
Quintana Roo and Sinaloa.
Recommended prevention: II.

Timaticweb Version 1.3
16 February 2013
ALSO NOTE that return / onward ticketing is technically required by 1) Airline ticket agents (who can be fined if you are returned because you are refused admittance), and 2) Mexican immigration / migración, though they rarely check.

IATA TimaticWeb R38) Ticket (US Citizen to Mexico, no transit elsewhere)
......

Immigration authorities may request visitors and transit
passengers to prove that they will depart from the country
within the prescribed period, by showing a return or onward
ticket to their next international destination.

Unless stated otherwise, return/onward ticket is defined as:

a. International airline ticket (i.e. any types of airline
tickets, reservation confirmation, booking code etc.); or

b. Evidence of departing from the country by other means of
transportation (e.g. confirmation of joining a cruise, train,
bus or ferry tickets, proof of departing by private boat or
plane, etc).
The issue used to be addressable by purchasing an airline MCO (Miscellaneous Charges Order), which was also refundable; MCOs are not generally offered by airlines for those purposes any longer.

IMO your best bet is a fully refundable ticket back, but of course, it means a significant investment.

Mexico immigration officials are generally not the problem. Airline ticket counter agents, however, can be personally fined and the airline fined, iirc, $10,000 and required to provide transport back to the country of origin - and most airline agents do not want to have one of these "stick" to them and their personnel record. So, they will often be sticklers rather than risk the issue.

CHILDREN: "Minors Traveling Alone: Mexican law requires that any non-Mexican citizen under the age of 18 traveling to or from Mexico must carry notarized written permission from any parent or legal guardian not traveling with the child in addition to their passport. In part, this is to prevent international child abductions. Minors traveling without their parents, or with only one parent, must present proof that they have their parents' authorization for travel. This document must include the name of the parent, the name of the child, the name of anyone traveling with the child, and the notarized signature(s) of the absent parent(s). It should also include travel dates, destinations, airlines and a brief summary of the circumstances surrounding the travel. The child must have possession of the original letter – not a facsimile or scanned copy – as well as proof of the parent/child relationship (usually a birth certificate or court document) – and an original custody decree if applicable. If traveling by air, travelers should also contact their airline for additional requirements." (JaltembaBayLife)

FIREARMS: Mexico is very strict about firearms. Handguns are rarely admitted; hunting weapons (long arms) may be admitted, but they require an extensive procedure. (Under Article 10 of the Constitution, Mexicans are allowed private ownership of firearms; the importation of firearms is governed by Title III, Chapter III, Article 55 of the Ley Federal de Armas de Fuego y Explosivos (Federal Law of Firearms and Explosives). Mexican citizens, residents and visitors may import firearms only after obtaining the proper permits from the Secretariat of defense (Army); "Under these articles, those who intend to engage in hunting and shooting sport activities in Mexico, must first obtain the required temporary import permit from the Secretariat of National Defense prior to traveling to Mexico." Contact your nearest Consulate or Embassy for current information.

"It is illegal and punishable by law to enter Mexican territory with any firearm as well as to keep and carry any firearm on your person or vehicle at any time, anywhere. These permits cannot be obtained at Mexican customs and immigration when entering Mexico. They must be obtained in advance and in possession of the bearer before any gun enters Mexico. Once entering Mexico with a gun without previous authorization from the Mexican government, a crime has been committed."

Originally Posted by U S State Department
The Department of State warns U.S. citizens against taking any type of firearm or ammunition into Mexico without prior written authorization from the Mexican authorities. Entering Mexico with a firearm or a single round of ammunition carries a penalty of up to five years in jail, even if the firearm or ammunition is taken into Mexico unintentionally.

The Mexican government strictly enforces its laws restricting the entry of firearms and ammunition along all land borders and at air and seaports. This has resulted in arrests, convictions, and long prison sentences for U.S. citizens, even those who unintentionally crossed the border with firearms or ammunition in their possession. U.S. citizens approaching Mexico along the land border who realize they are in possession of unauthorized firearms or ammunition should not seek to enter Mexico.

The only way to legally import firearms and/or ammunition into Mexico is to secure a permit in advance from the Mexican Embassy in Washington, D.C. or from a Mexican consulate.
ARRIVALS AND FORMALITIES: If your baggage is checked through to your final Mexico destination, though you will have to process through immigration (MIGRACIÓN) you will probably not see your baggage until you get there - but it will have a tag indicating you have arrived internationally and it may be inspected by an agent of Aduana / Customs at your destination airport.


Mexico Customs form

If you have arrived at your destination (direct flight from the US or elsewhere) the process is you follow the queues to MIGRACION (immigration) where you will present your passport and FMM. These minor officials can be officious and can plod; if you look sufficiently scruffy to them, they can demand proof of onward ticketing out of Mexico or proof of self-sufficiency (credit card usually serves the latter purpose), but you'll get through eventually, proceed following the signs to the carousels and collect your baggage - many airports offer the free use of baggage carts.

Once you recover your baggage proceed to the queue for ADUANA (Customs). Proceed to the Customs kiosk and hand your Customs declaration to the agent. If you have nothing to delcare, you will be asked to push the big shiny button on what looks like a miniature traffic signal / robot. If the light turns green, take your bags and proceed - you may have to also pass your baggage through an x-ray machine prior to arriving landside in some airports, such as MEX.

If the light turns red or you have something to declare, you will proceed to tables or steel benches for a secondary inspection.

Prohibited items on arrival in Mexico include:
  • Firearms of any type and ammunition (VERY strict!)
  • Knives larger than a pocket / Swiss Army knife (hunting, personal defense, large dive knife)
  • Many food items - especially meats, plants, seeds, vegetables, etc.
  • Cigars and cigarettes - more than 20 packs per person
  • Liquor and wine - more than 3 liters per person
  • Film or videocassettes - more than 12 rolls/cassettes
  • Medicine for personal use - you must have a prescription if you needed one to get the medicine in the first place
  • Note Mexico is very strict about tranquilizers, soporifics, any kind of stimulants and recreational drugs, including marijuana
BTW, you're allowed to bring three liters of alcoholic beverages into México.

OK, now into the arrivals scrum landside and find your transport, etc. Beware of very pesky time share touts at resort airports. ¡Bienvenido a México!

MORE TRAVEL INFORMATION

CASH - NEW MONEY LAUNDERING LAWS: A new Mexican law limits the amount of foreign currency a business can accept each month. This means foreign currency is not as well accepted as before. (That having been said, I got a 20% cash discount in a well-established jewelry store in México City for USD cash April 2014.) Many businesses that previously accepted foreign currency (restaurants, bars, shops, taxis, etc.) may ask you to pay in Mexican pesos. You will need to have Mexican pesos at one time or another. Cash machines / ATMs are a good source of Mexican pesos, and banks exchange dollars readily.

CASH MACHINES and ATMs are common, and have badges showing which card affiliations are acceptable (Maestro, Cirrus, Visa, etc.) Use your cash / ATM card, not your credit card, which will incur cash advance fees in addition to any foreign bank withdrawal and forec (foreign exchange fees). Take precautions and be aware of others in the vicinity - preferably, use ATMs inside a bank. Be aware of common ATM frauds.

CREDIT CARDS: Visa and MasterCard are widely accepted, American Express is not accepted at a number of businesses or may incur a ~3% fee. (OTOH, it may be a wash as AMEX Centurion and Platinum do not incur the 3% forex fee many cards do.) Know where your cards are at all times and watch for the usual credit card scams - credit card theft is not unheard of.

Note: My most recent experiences were in April 2014, and I was issued an FMM in Spanish; though I declared for 8 days, my form was ticked for up to 180 days. The fine for not turning in the right hand third tear off seemed to be USD $70 at MEX airport. In addition, each family was required to fill in and turn into Customs / Aduana a Customs declaration.

In August 2012 we crossed the border southbound at San Ysidro and had to fil out FMM and a Customs form - most staff was gone and our baggage was not taken from the bus and searched. On the return at Otay Mesa, CA (instead of the more crowded San Ysidro) crossing into the USA, there was a SENTRI queue (nearly no queue at all) and a normal line. We did not stop at Mexico immigration to turn in the right hand tear off (we were granted 8 days instead of 180 on this entry) and at the US we did not have to fill out a U S Customs form; however all baggage was x-rayed.

RETURNING TO USA: Of course, have your passport / documents to prove admissibility. As well, US Customs currently authorize tourists:

From Mexico, if you have not used your customs exemption within the last thirty days, you are allowed a personal exemption (per person) of USD $800 value of items you have purchased for your own consumption or gifts, including repairs to goods you took with you. The items must be in your possession, and you must declare them - if you do not you may forfeit them. You may not bring back goods that are originally Cuban (e.g. Cuban cigars purchased in Mexico are prohibited.) (If you have used your personal exemption within the last 30 days, you are allowed a $200 exemption.)

Under NAFTA (1994), your goods from Mexico made in Mexico may be exempt from duty; see here. This may change if the Trump administration abandons NAFTA or makes relevant regulatory changes.

Alcohol and Tobacco: You are allowed to import one liter / 33.8 fl oz of Alcoholic Beverages per adult 21 years of age or over, the alcohol is for your own use and the state you reside in allows importation of alcoholic beverages. You may import not more than 200 cigarettes and 100 cigars (none of Cuban origin). You may be able to bring back more than that in both categories, but at dutiable rates.

For further information, including information on pets, medication, etc. download and read the PDF brochure "KNOW BEFORE YOU GO" available here. You may also visit the U.S. Customs & Border Protection INFO Center at https://help.cbp.gov. (Fireworks and alcohol exceeding 70% / 140 proof / 70 ABV are prohibited to in checked luggage by US TSA hazardous materials regulations; you are allowed by the TSA to have "up to five liters of alcohol with alcohol content between 24% and 70% per person as checked luggage if it’s packaged in a sealable bottle or flask". "Alcoholic beverages with less than 24% alcohol content are not subject to hazardous materials regulations.")

For Canadian customs requirements click here.

*IF YOU LOSE the FMM half you are supposed to retain and return on departure, the proper procedure is to fill out a form at the Instituto Nacional de Migración kiosk, pay MXN 295 (about USD $23) and present the receipt from the bank and substitute immigration departure form to Migración authorities. This is time consuming but should not take longer than thirty minutes - though if the banks are closed or the authorities are not working (work hours are Terminal 1: 10 am - 10 pm and Terminal 2: 10 am - 8 pm, two hours less evenings weekends and holidays) one can miss one's flight. AICM (Mexico City International Airport) states about fifty visitors a day have lost their FMM form departure half. You could be forced to stay overnight in the airport (can not go out, can not go airside) until you can get your airline to reticket you - it's up to you if you as to what you can negotiate for a price.

SCAMS in Immigration: Some unscrupulous immigration officers will lay into you and tell you how "they can help" - and for a bit more than the official fine, about MXN 300, will place a stamp into a new form and let you out of the country. It is estimated (June 2013) crooked immigration authorities currently are raking in MXN 15,000 (over USD $1,200) a day from bribes taken in this way. (Reforma newspaper, 15 Jun 2013 - link)

Last edited by JDiver; Sep 7, 17 at 1:22 pm Reason: add / update/ Aug 2017
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Old Jul 7, 12, 3:07 pm
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Visas

Some citizens of other countries will require a valid visa in their passport. Some may be available n arrival, others will have to be arranged in advance of travel.

One fairly decent source for sorting these out is Timatic, used by the airlines themselves. Delta Airlines offers this useful service to their flyers, and you can use it here. Merely enter Citizenship or Alien Residency status, type of Passport, Destination County and Connecting Country (ir appropriate) and you have the same information the airlines will offer (if they are on the ball).

Mexico's Secretaría de Gobernación (basically the secretariat of internal affairs) offers this page with a listing of those countries whose citizens need a visa.

This page lists countries whose nationals do NOT need a visa to visit Mexico, and it states "Persons from the following countries do not need a visa to enter Mexico as Tourists, Transmigrators and Business Visitors. Tourists' and Business Visitors' stay may not exceed 180 days; transmigrators may remain in Mexico for up to 30 days..." (Transmigrators are those with another ultimate destination but will be transiting Mexico en route.)

Not knowing how assiduous SecGob is about maintaining their website, I'd double check with TimaticWeb.

TWOV / TRANSIT WITHOUT VISA: is allowed for those connecting in Mexico to an onward international flight - but TimaticWeb does warn a minimum of three hours should be provided at CUN / Cancún International Airport.

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Old Jul 7, 12, 3:07 pm
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MINORS IN MEXICO as of 25 Jan 2014

http://consulmex.sre.gob.mx/washingt...inors_2014.pdf

MINORS AND PERSONS UNDER JUDICIAL GUARDIANSHIP EXITING MEXICO

1. According to new immigration rules, from January 25th., 2014 on, minors that DO NOT require parental consent to exit Mexico when traveling alone or with a third party, are those traveling for non paid activities (tourists or students visiting for less than 180 days among others).

2. Minors that DO require parental consent to exit Mexico alone or with a third party are those that live in Mexico as temporary residents, students (more than 180 days) or permanent residents. From January 25th on, minors and persons under judicial guardianship will show upon exiting Mexico one of the following documents:

● Notarized document signed by both parents or person that holds custody authorizing the trip out of Mexico and detailing the means of transportation, destination and date of travel. Such document will be granted by the authority that can attest and certify documents, legalized or apostilled and translated into Spanish.
OR
● Another option, besides the document above mentioned, will be one obtained through the “Instituto Nacional de Migración” (Mexican Immigration Institute) known as “Formato de Salida de Menores” (SAM) that can be found at www.inm.gob.mx

NOTE: Such document (SAM) will be handed to an immigration officer while exiting Mexico at an airport, border or sea port, who will seal it and keep one copy. The second copy should be handed to the transportation employee and the third copy will be kept by the minor. The document will be valid for 180 days and can be used only once.

3. Minors and persons under judicial guardianship who exit Mexico accompanied by both parents, one of them or the person who holds custody, do not require any kind of additional document.

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Old Dec 7, 12, 2:15 pm
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Arrow Info for Canadian

http://www.canadainternational.gc.ca...as.aspx?view=d

Entering Mexico

As of March 1st, 2010, all Canadian citizens need a valid passport to enter Mexico. Canadian citizens without a valid passport will not be allowed entry into Mexico and will be returned to Canada. In order to avoid delays and misunderstandings, we strongly recommend that you travel with a passport valid for six months after your arrival date.

Visas for Mexico

Canadians travelling on regular Canadian passports do not require visas to enter Mexico if the purpose of their trip is tourism and the stay does not exceed 180 days (a fee is applicable if entering by land. For those travelling by air the fee is included in the price of the plane ticket).

However, all Canadians entering Mexico either by plane or land should have a tourist card filled out and have it stamped at their first port of entry. When entering by land, you will have to go to the immigration booth located at the border crossing. When entering by plane and transiting through Mexico City, your tourist card should be stamped in Mexico City before boarding towards your final destination.

Do not assume that you will be automatically granted the maximum validity period of 180 days. If your tourist visa was issued for less than 180 days, you might be able to have it extended at the nearest Immigration office (fee applicable).

Last edited by JDiver; Feb 26, 13 at 10:42 am Reason: add arrow
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Old Dec 9, 12, 11:44 am
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Health Information

Mexico has areas with Malaria, Dengue and / or Zika virus. Check with your travel health professional. Also see the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) here. Read their Health Information for Travelers to Mexico here.

Food and water basics (CDC) see here.

Water: Though some hotels and resorts do pipe potable water throughout, in most places do not assume water is safe to drink. In Mexico City, earth movement and pipe bursts mean the water is subject to cross contamination with sewerage, ground water, etc.

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Old Feb 4, 13, 10:37 am
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Arrow For those driving their vehicle into Mexico...

If driving, you can also get the vehicle import permit via internet. It comes to your house via Fedex or DHL. This will save the hassle of having to get the permit at the border, which sometimes involves a long line depending on where you cross.

If you get it, take the full 180 days.

Read the instructions carefully and be advised the only place you can cancel the permit is at the border with the vehicle.

I also always get the tourist card stamped upon exit at the border.

https://www.banjercito.com.mx/registroVehiculos/

Last edited by JDiver; Feb 26, 13 at 10:42 am Reason: add title and arrow
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Old Feb 11, 13, 9:13 pm
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¡Muchas gracias! Martinis at 8 - very useful information.
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Old Jun 19, 13, 9:44 am
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US Passport 4 months expiration

I am travelling to Mexico City for a 2 day business trip in early July 2013. My passport expires in November 2013. My flight is with United. Do you think I will have problems because I am less than 6 months before expiration? Everything I am reading on the Internet says for Mexico you just need a valid passport, not 6 months. Should I try for an expedited renewal with CIBT, but then there is a risk they won't get it back to me in time?
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Old Jun 19, 13, 12:23 pm
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FMM Tourist Card

Does anyone know where I can apply for the FMM - Tourist Card in advance?

Besides doing it at the border? Can I get one at the Mexico Counsulate General's office or at a tourist office?
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Old Jun 19, 13, 11:10 pm
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Originally Posted by BRQuestioner View Post
I am travelling to Mexico City for a 2 day business trip in early July 2013. My passport expires in November 2013. My flight is with United. Do you think I will have problems because I am less than 6 months before expiration? Everything I am reading on the Internet says for Mexico you just need a valid passport, not 6 months. Should I try for an expedited renewal with CIBT, but then there is a risk they won't get it back to me in time?
Your query has been merged into the existing thread on this topic. I suggest you read the first post; you can also follow the link to TIMATIC provided to run your own case - TIMATIC is what the airlines use to decide if you can fly or not. There is no six month requirement stated - Instituto Nacional de Migración (INM) officers will not give you a visa validity that exceeds the validity of your passport, that's all. Tell them you are visiting for 5 - 30 days ("buffer" time in case anything goes wrong) and Bob's your uncle, or is that Beto es tu tío?


Originally Posted by skyline101 View Post
Does anyone know where I can apply for the FMM - Tourist Card in advance?

Besides doing it at the border? Can I get one at the Mexico Counsulate General's office or at a tourist office?
Why do you ask? If you are flying, the airline will issue you one; at the border, you will have one issued. The approval is actually done at your Mexican port of entry (POE) my the Migración officer (who can override and amend the length of time one might get on a Consulate issued form). You can probably get one earlier if you have a local Mexican consulate you can visit.

Last edited by JDiver; Mar 7, 14 at 6:09 pm
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Old Jun 21, 13, 1:56 pm
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Where exactly at the border will I apply for the FMM? Is it at the border control office (on the mexican side)?
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Old Jun 21, 13, 6:30 pm
  #12  
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Originally Posted by skyline101 View Post
Where exactly at the border will I apply for the FMM? Is it at the border control office (on the mexican side)?
On the Mexican side you will see signs for the "MIGRACIÓN" offices; they usually have stacks of them there. Some of the pens may be quirky or in use, so bring a decent black (or blue) pen.

For baggage checks, there is a separate area marked "ADUANA" (Customs) where you will write up a customs declaration form (illustrated in the OP) and turn it in, and may be asked to place baggage on a platform for inspection. You may be asked to push a large button on what looks like a small traffic light - Green means you are clear, Red means you get an inspection.

If you are driving, you may stop at an inland facility where they will check your paperwork.

For those who can read it in Castilian / Spanish, there is an illustrated PDF manual for those driving into Mexico.

Last edited by JDiver; Mar 7, 14 at 6:08 pm
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Old Jul 7, 13, 11:43 am
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Regarding my previous post, one of the other secretaries at my work knew that CIBT does it fast and she took care of it for me. CIBT returned my passport to me in 6 days, so I'm good for another 10 years.
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Old Jul 7, 13, 1:47 pm
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Originally Posted by BRQuestioner View Post
Regarding my previous post, one of the other secretaries at my work knew that CIBT does it fast and she took care of it for me. CIBT returned my passport to me in 6 days, so I'm good for another 10 years.
Good to know; a big ¡gracias! for sharing.

I've used TDS. With the Passport Agency expedite fees, the TDS or CBIT fees, it's not the cheapest option, but then again sometimes one has to bite the bullet and get it done. At least it's every ten years, so it's less galling that way.

As a contrast, my niece (Mexico citizen) needed more passport pages to get her visa for India. "Sorry we do not add pages - you need to get a new passport, pay full fees, and we can expedite it for <muchos pesos>." For another slim-Jim passport with insufficient pages. They made her retake her passport pictures because of some hair covering her ears in the original ones submitted.

Last edited by JDiver; Mar 7, 14 at 6:08 pm
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Old Oct 1, 13, 6:05 am
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I'm coming from Britain on a UK passport, first into Mia, and then onwards to CUN by air, and finally going back to the UK direct from CUN. its a 2 week vacation in total.

I'm entering the US on the US Visa Waiver program. (i.e. I won't have a visa)

I'm assuming I just fill in the relevant customs/ immigration forms on the AA flight to CUN ?

Is it really a requirement to have a prescription for standard meds such as BP tabs and statins ?
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