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Valet crashed my car - then charged me $38

Valet crashed my car - then charged me $38

 
Old Jul 11, 17, 9:55 am
  #31  
 
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You can report it to your insurance company, but tell them you don't want to pursue it through them at the present time because the hotel has accepted responsibility. The insurance company shouldn't hold that against you because they like that, and in any case it doesn't imply you are a worse risk - they are looking for predictive value. It is a lot like the situation with the uninsured motorist coverage - someone hits you, their insurance should cover it, but you report to your insurance just in case there is an issue and you have to use your uninsured motorist coverage.
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Old Jul 12, 17, 7:44 am
  #32  
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Originally Posted by drphun View Post
You can report it to your insurance company, but tell them you don't want to pursue it through them at the present time because the hotel has accepted responsibility. The insurance company shouldn't hold that against you because they like that, and in any case it doesn't imply you are a worse risk - they are looking for predictive value. It is a lot like the situation with the uninsured motorist coverage - someone hits you, their insurance should cover it, but you report to your insurance just in case there is an issue and you have to use your uninsured motorist coverage.
OP insurance should still handle the claim. It's part of what they're paid for. However OP can refuse to have them pay out the claim and instead let the other insurance payout directly. Never deal with someone else's insurance directly. You are not their client. Their job is to save their client and theirself money. Your insurance is there to assist you, even if you don't let them payout on a claim.

It's the paying out of a claim that causes it to count against you. This assumes, claim can be held against you by law to begin with.
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Old Jul 12, 17, 11:18 am
  #33  
 
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On-topic: If the OP didn't want use what he already paid for AND pay extra for the benefit of his insurance company working with Marriott's company then they should have not filed the claim with his company until he did not receive satisfaction working with Marriott's company.

Best bet which doesn't happen often, cash settlement from Marriott with no claim or none of the OP's info included in the claim(Marriot files direct). Then OP can take the money to the body shop of OP's choice for repairs and claims process and its impacts to deal with.

Background:

Insurance companies can not exclude coverage if OP comes to them later and says "I tried to work it out with them and was not satisfied". Now if you don't know what you are doing or what you should receive for settlement and admit fault or sign something that reduces others liabilities during the process you could limit what your company can do.

As has been said before, Not at-fault claims can and do impact your rates(could be a couple of dollars to hundreds depending a large number of factors) and can be considered for underwriting action by insurance companies which could include non-renewal.

In any state where a "Insurance score" is a part of the calculation of your rates then that score considers all claims listed on your CLUE report. Interesting note from the"how to read the report" is that not all companies report the fault indicator. Regardless, each company can decide how to rate you based on the information in the report and what you tell them on your application so YMMV. Your next rate change could be based on your insurance score moving in the negative direction which in part could be based on claims you consider not your fault.

You can tell if you company uses the "insurance score" by looking at the fine print on your policy or bill(sometimes needs to be the printed copy since it is boiler plate language, possibility on the back of a page and not all companies put images of all parts of the bill online) . It will mention something about using your credit(another part of the "Insurance score" but not all states) and other reports in determining your rates.

If your state doesn't use the insurance score your insurance company most likely relies more heavily on the CLUE report. Which you can get changed if inaccurate and you can even add a statement too if you want. But the statement will not change the automated calculation of your rate, only your company or state regulator can change how your company chooses to rate for Not At-fault claims.
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Old Jul 12, 17, 2:36 pm
  #34  
 
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I'm surprised no one mentioned the fact that the hotel may not be owned or run by Marriott. Who the right party is to deal with depends on the hotel, as does the likelihood of "bennies" from Marriott.

The OP should also watch out for "loss of use" fees which his insurance may not cover. He needs to check his policy and perhaps state insurance law.

OP should be careful, especially WRT the advice on this board because state law with regard to auto insurance as well as state (and local) law regarding inn-keepers varies widely.

Finally, a hotel should have a difficult time ducking responsibility for a person acting on their behalf, legally an agent, even if they're not employed by the hotel. Unfortunately, asserting rights like this often involves an attorney, and the damages here may be too small. $6000 in damages like to the van is probably not too small, since your counsel would be negotiating to get his bill payed by the other party. Note too that things like this are almost always settled out of court.

So, when things like this go sour, a letter from your counsel will almost always move the other party to action.
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Old Jul 12, 17, 3:45 pm
  #35  
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Originally Posted by noahcon View Post
But they still charged me $38 for valet parking and took all the points.
While it may be best to refund as a matter of customer service, they are not legally obligated to do anything.

At the minimum, you have utilized the room and the parking.

Originally Posted by maracle View Post
If the accident wasn't your fault then you won't be charged higher premiums.
I would say the correct way to say this is an insurer can't increase your premium simply because you have a no-fault incident. However, the insurer can still raise your premium for all other reasons (such as increased cost of insurance).

Originally Posted by drphun View Post
You can report it to your insurance company, but tell them you don't want to pursue it through them at the present time because the hotel has accepted responsibility.
+1 You paid the premium. Let your insurance works for you.

Originally Posted by klevin99 View Post
I'm surprised no one mentioned the fact that the hotel may not be owned or run by Marriott. Who the right party is to deal with depends on the hotel, as does the likelihood of "bennies" from Marriott.
Exceptionally true.

In fact - it is almost certain that the valet is run by another vendor.

Marriott may not be liable as much as you think.
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Old Jul 13, 17, 2:05 pm
  #36  
 
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Originally Posted by garykung View Post
I would say the correct way to say this is an insurer can't increase your premium simply because you have a no-fault incident. However, the insurer can still raise your premium for all other reasons (such as increased cost of insurance).
Not accurate for most states. Substitute "may not" for "can't" and it would be accurate.

Laws and other restrictions on how rates are determined are passed at the state level by legislatures and regulators.

If there are no specific laws or restrictions then each company decides how to do it.

Recent article on this
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Old Jul 13, 17, 2:43 pm
  #37  
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There is a good chance that if the property's insurer is one of the "bigs" that it has contracts with a series of preferred collision repair places in NYC which are often the same across a lot of companies including perhaps OP's.

With a property-only claim on the smallish side, the easiest resolution is to pick one of those repair places presuming that it is decent and you aren't driving anything particularly special. The whole thing is then taken care of by the property's insurance company and many places even arrange for Enterprise or somesuch to drop off a rental (or have an Enterprise agent on site).

No cash changes hands, you have not reported anything and as many folks here point out, it isn't certain that reporting to your carrier won't have adverse consequences. Even if the carrier is violating local law, it can take forever and a lot of your personal time to get it fixed.

As to the $38, as with all things such as this, why not simply ask to have the charge removed on the spot or at least when dealing with the property at the time it accepted responsibility. E.g., "thanks for making this liability issue simple, however I noticed that one of your folks left the parking charge on. Will you handle the $38 refund for me?"
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