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Bitten by guest's dog in Marriott lobby

Bitten by guest's dog in Marriott lobby

Old Mar 1, 2020, 12:24 am
  #46  
 
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Originally Posted by deac83
Sigh. My lack of details were more around not having the Marriott mother ship link my user name to me personally.

Walked into lobby after work. Hotel elevators are terrible. One opened as I walked up. Man with dog there waiting and he went into elevator with dog. Not really thinking about it and assuming some one with a 'pet' in a hotel has it under control, I followed to enter the elevator. The owner had the dog on a leash, When I was at the entrance the owner was facing away and the dog he was trying to control was facing me. The dog made a move for my leg, but got the pants. I started rethinking taking the elevator, but then the dog jumped at me and grabbed my hand and bit one of my fingers. After I found three puncture wounds with one deep enough to bleed. Owner did not see the dog bite me. I yelled when it happened and the owner got upset that I was yelling at the dog and told me to get out of the elevator (which I was doing anyway), I told him I was bitten and he just told me to get out. He went up in the elevator with the dog.

I went to the front desk and told them I was just bitten by a guest's dog, who I assumed had just checked in. They said he checked in the day before and called security and his room.

He came back down, without the dog. Expressed no remorse or showed any concern about my injuries (maybe he didn't want to admit liability).

Hotel called the police and paramedics.

Hotel staff did nothing for me until I asked for a bandage or something for the bleeding. They seemed completely unprepared to handle the situation.

Waited for paramedics and police. Police report documenting it. They told me the dog would be quarantined for 10 days (which I learned means the owner has to keep the dog with them for 10 days, no running around in the backyard without a leash etc). Owner has said it has shots and is sending those to the health department which has contacted me. Owner didn't leave hotel until Friday so it will probably be Monday to have confirmation.

Hotel, zero response that night or next day. Never called me to check how I was. As I've said didn't even offer to get me some bandaids (fortunately I carry them plus some antiseptic).

The only significance to he size of the animal is the hotel specifically states not pets over 40 lbs. By their own rules this animal should not have been in the hotel.

Hotel is in NJ, Owner is in PA and I'm in TX.

Hopefully that clarifies any confusion and answers the questions.
Clearly your fault OP. How dare you try to enter an elevator with a dog! How dare you sir!
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Old Mar 1, 2020, 12:48 am
  #47  
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Originally Posted by yorkboy24
Thankfully I live in a country where there isnt a blame culture where the mentality is always to sue and ruin people for every mistake made.

1. The priority is to make sure the OP is properly treated and taken care of. Given that health care probably needs insurance (and isnt free in that country - another flaw), surely the hotel should at least pay for that under its insurance policies?

2. The other problem is a cultural one where dogs are actually allowed in hotels. It doesnt matter if the dog is 40lbs or 30lbs or several pounds over the limit, they still bite! They are animals and cant be completely controlled no matter how much theyve been trained. Do all hotels there allow dogs or is it a legal right?! Anyway, just like the McDonalds case where they ended up putting warnings on their coffee cups caution - hot because someone sued them when they spilt their coffee and scolded themselves, hotels are likely to follow with disclaimers when you check in (they may have this already). So the choice is 1) choose a hotel with a no-dog policy to eliminate risk completely or accept that there is risk.

3. Liability - someone is clearly liable but legal action for the sake of it (to bleed someone dry) is wrong. Did the owner apologise? Did they offer to pay for the health care? The hotel should offer something too, at least comping the stay and some points but as I said, priority is the welfare of the OP and any measures to avoid it happening again (very difficult if the dog was already on a lead etc).

And yes, very sad for the dog. It may have to be put down.

first sensible reply in this thread. Sadly this compensation culture is rearing its ugly head in Europe now.
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Old Mar 1, 2020, 1:16 am
  #48  
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Originally Posted by fdem
first sensible reply in this thread. Sadly this compensation culture is rearing its ugly head in Europe now.
It would be even more sad if the Im gonna take my big dog wherever I want and screw you if you dont like it culture makes its way to Europe.
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Old Mar 1, 2020, 1:43 am
  #49  
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Originally Posted by garykung



No offense - This is an extremely bad advice.

1. Hotel definitely has insurance. And its pocket is for sure deeper that the guest for sure.

2. It is easier to sue a business than a person, as well as resolving the disputes.

3. Based on OP, by allowing a pit bull in a hotel as pet, Hotel may have engaged a practice that can deem as reckless disregard. Hotel can face punitive damage when warranted. But since the guest has the hotel's approval, and based on its causal occurrence (it was an accident after all), the guest will definitely be not liable for the punitive damage. So suing the hotel may yield a better result than the guest.
Sue the hotel because they have more money?? That's precisely what's wrong with the US tort culture... The only people who win are ambulance-chasing lawyers...

The dog's owner is responsible for the dog's behaviour. Full stop.

Somebody else should be made responsible for not stopping the irresponsibility of another? Not buying it, and neither will a court...
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Old Mar 1, 2020, 1:43 am
  #50  
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Originally Posted by deac83
Hopefully that clarifies any confusion and answers the questions.
​​​​​​
Thanks OP for the details. All on the idiot owner who gives a bad name to all dog owners. I had a Boxer for 15 years, people confused it with a pit all the time. She had the sweetest disposition and won over a lot of initially reticent people but I still was 100% aware when other people were around us.

In your example, I would always be between my dog and other people in an elevator. Who knows what any dog hears/feels/smells/thinks in an elevator that could result in their feeling threatened by mistake? That is not other people's problems but mine and so I tried to act accordingly. Did not bring her to hotels though, I find that you are imposing on others doing that personally.

I hope you have no untoward medical consequences from this incident and that it is resolved to your satisfaction.

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Old Mar 1, 2020, 1:56 am
  #51  
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Originally Posted by travelinmanS
It would be even more sad if the Im gonna take my big dog wherever I want and screw you if you dont like it culture makes its way to Europe.
Not sure what parts of Europe you're thinking of, but the dog infestation of restaurants is FAR FAR worse in Germany than anywhere I've seen in the US. Almost every time I dine out, there's someone who shares their human meal with their little angel. And it's hard to find a traditional Bavarian restaurant without at least one 75+ y/o regular who allows their poodle/dachshund/whatever to sit on the bench. The fake emotional support animal culture in the US is disgusting, but let's not pretend other countries don't have similar problems.
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Old Mar 1, 2020, 2:17 am
  #52  
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First stop = doctor.
Second stop = police.
Third stop = lawyer.

Go for it, OP. Dogs do not belong in hotels and if owners insist on bringing them, they should be in kennels at the back.
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Old Mar 1, 2020, 2:18 am
  #53  
 
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Originally Posted by Pittie Pup
Can OP please provide the details of how their hand came to be in the proximity that allowed for said dog, with unknown previous interactions, to bite them? I don't usually make it a habit of placing my hands near the mouths of animals that I do not have regular familiarity with. I would be more embarrassed as a grown adult to admit I had engaged in such a seemingly careless act that resulted in my injury. If the dog had been running loose in the lobby or not under direct control of the owner then I apologize in advance as this is the result of an irresponsible dog owner.
As a grown adult I expect other grown adults to have trained their dog properly and such training would include not biting.

Anyone that starts a conversation "Why would you put your hands near a dog you don't know?" is exculpating the dog and the owner for a lack of training and a lack of attention. If the dog bites then it's been badly trained. It and the owner should be put down.

Personally, I would have assumed a lawyer would name the owner and the hotel severally. The hotel for allowing a dog that apparently didn't meet their own policies and failing to exercise due & reasonable care for a guest, and the owner for failure to control, injury, psych damage, etc.
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Old Mar 1, 2020, 2:25 am
  #54  
 
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Originally Posted by yorkboy24
2. The other problem is a cultural one where dogs are actually allowed in hotels. It doesnt matter if the dog is 40lbs or 30lbs or several pounds over the limit, they still bite! They are animals and cant be completely controlled no matter how much theyve been trained. Do all hotels there allow dogs or is it a legal right?! Anyway, just like the McDonalds case where they ended up putting warnings on their coffee cups caution - hot because someone sued them when they spilt their coffee and scolded themselves, hotels are likely to follow with disclaimers when you check in (they may have this already). So the choice is 1) choose a hotel with a no-dog policy to eliminate risk completely or accept that there is risk.
.
I would think the fix is obvious. If an dog is brought onto a property then when in public areas it must be muzzled.
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Old Mar 1, 2020, 3:39 am
  #55  
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Originally Posted by Pittie Pup
Can OP please provide the details of how their hand came to be in the proximity that allowed for said dog, with unknown previous interactions, to bite them? I don't usually make it a habit of placing my hands near the mouths of animals that I do not have regular familiarity with. I would be more embarrassed as a grown adult to admit I had engaged in such a seemingly careless act that resulted in my injury.
it happened to me at a beach resort in sri lanka....i was sitting on a beach chair when a family came & sat down on the chairs next to me....they had a german shepherd who came up from behind me & grabbed my elbow without any warning....

i had no intention of placing my hand anywhere near the dog's mouth but these things can happen....i have 2 big dogs myself & they are both gentle giants....but i make sure i hold on to them tight if they are around people they don't recognize....
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Old Mar 1, 2020, 3:44 am
  #56  
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Originally Posted by trooper
I think this is a sad commentary on todays world. Surely the OWNER is far more responsible than the Hotel... but "lets go after the deep pockets"? How about holding the person who is ACTUALLY responsible...responsible? Oh no... lets look to who is going to give us a bigger payout! I am SO glad that "Contingency fees" are illegal in Australia.
I understand why you feel sad. The problem is the dog owner may not have any insurance or money to pay for OP's injury. So by suing the owner (which is clearly responsible), OP can potentially destroy the owner's life.

Lawsuits are something realistic. No person would like to waste tons of money on legal fees just to get a point (businesses? maybe). So in this case, going after the hotel is the least of all evil.
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Old Mar 1, 2020, 4:09 am
  #57  
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Get advice from a decent lawyer and please tell us what they say.
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Old Mar 1, 2020, 4:43 am
  #58  
 
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Originally Posted by RedSun
I just feel that OP should go after the hotel, not the dog owner. Hotel should be a safe place for all guests to enjoy. The hotel can go after the dog owner if they want to. I just do not think it is productive to sue the dog owner who had received permission to bring in the dog.

I have two neighbors who got into some some trouble with the dog. The mother and kid were walking around the neighborhood and were close to dog's house. The dog jumped out of the fence and started to bark at the strangers. The kid got scared and started to run away. Then the dog chased after the kid and somehow left some scratches on kid's legs before the mother chased away the dog. Police got involved. Dog was evaluated by the animal doctor and get clearance. The kid's mother wanted to have the dog put down. But the owner refused. The dog owner did take care the medical bills.

To the end, the kid's mother still upset and sent several letters to neighbors. The dog owner set a more sturdy fence and the dog still barks when we passing by. The dog never bothered us or chased us even the dog was outside the fence.
The dog owner is ultimately responsible for their own dog and should be the first to be paying for medical bills.

Why let the dog owner off the hook just because they had permission? What if this happened in a residential apartment building that allowed pets and a person in the lobby is bitten by a residents dog.

It is tiring to hear the never hurt a fly just lick you to death mantra which often ends in victim blaming what did you do to provoke the dog?

Some of that dog always blameless attitude ended up here where the OP was questioned as to how they could get close enough to an unknown dog to allow themselves to be bitten ... I guess dog and owner should always have an elevator to themselves and an adult should be embarrassed to dare to enter the elevator and get close to the dogs mouth.

What next, speculating that the dog was open mouth smiling and the OP somehow managed to scratch and impale his hand on the teeth of the dog?

Primary responsibility is with the dogs owner and only a lawyer can figure out any other liability. The dog owner should not get to skirt any liability. Maybe Marriott will ban the owner and dog.
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Old Mar 1, 2020, 5:08 am
  #59  
 
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Originally Posted by msp3
Sue sue and sue. Get the vicious breed pit bull put down and sue the scumbag that was responsible for it for every cent theyre worth (which may not be much given the kind of people who have pit bulls)
.
Good thing I can't read between the lines or I would think that your comment was very racist.
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Old Mar 1, 2020, 5:16 am
  #60  
 
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Originally Posted by cmd320
This is absolutely completely unacceptable. If this had happened to me in FL I would have absolutely defended myself as is acceptable by law. Owner should be far more careful if they care at all about their pet.

With that said, I’d definitely get a lawyer involved.
I have to assume that when you say "defended myself as is acceptable by law"
you would have defended yourself by firing a gun in a hotel lobby full of people? BRILLIANT!

.
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