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Bitten by guest's dog in Marriott lobby

Bitten by guest's dog in Marriott lobby

Old Mar 4, 20, 2:56 pm
  #136  
 
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Originally Posted by deac83 View Post
An update: 7 days after the biting incident, the owner has not sent the rabies certificate to the health department.
If you have the contact info for the owner, I suggest calling him and letting him know that you intend to have the first shot if he can't provide proof that his dog has been vaccinated. If you can't reach the owner or if he doesn't immediately provide the required information, I would ask the health department to explain to him the necessity of providing proof of vaccination and the cost to him for the needed treatment if he does not. I would also let the hotel know that you are considering getting vaccinated if the owner isn't forthcoming.

According to the CDC, no person in the US has contracted rabies from a dog or cat held in quarantine for 10 days. Although it is statistically unlikely that you will contract the disease, rabies is considered the world's mostly deadly virus. Expecting the owner of a dog to either provide prompt proof of vaccination or to cover the costs of treatment isn't unreasonable. The shots are not cheap and the costs of receiving them in the ER are much higher than in a doctor's office. Unfortunately, depending on where one lives, the ER may be the only option.

Last edited by rny321; Mar 4, 20 at 4:39 pm
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Old Mar 4, 20, 5:28 pm
  #137  
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Thanks for that. Now I just looked it up and shots can wind up costing out of pocket $10k-$20k depending on insurance.

Wonder what the poster who suggested it's an over reaction to having a 'little' blood drawn by this animal. Police and health authorities brought in and this idiot is either lying about his dog or is a person that has not respect for others.

The report I saw from the health department had a phone number missing one digit, intentional or accidental, beginning to wonder. The health department is tracking him down.

This is how you turn a relatively minor incident into a significant lawsuit.
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Old Mar 4, 20, 7:25 pm
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Got bitten by a dog while hiking in Eastern Europe about 15 years ago. Not the worst bite, but probably worse than yours - deep gash under the knee, bled for a few hours. I was in the boonies, so quarantining the dog was not an option.

Standard treatment was 5 rabies shots, spaced over a month, plus one optional immunoglobulin booster shot. These were normal shots in the arm, not particularly painful (things have improved since the days of Pasteur). Because I was traveling, I ended up getting two shots in the US, two in Eastern Europe, and one in Western Europe. Shots in the US were $160 a pop (insurance did pay), after a multi-hour wait at the ER (you may be able to get them from your primary doctor). In Europe they cost $10 with a much shorter wait. Strike one for socialized medicine.

This being said, the risk that the dog that bit you had rabies seems very low. If a normally gentle dog goes crazy (and is foaming at the mouth), then you worry about rabies. If a pitbull bites you, that's probably because that's what (some) pitbulls do. My understanding was that if the dog shows no rabies symptoms while under quarantine, then you don't need the shots (THIS IS NOT MEDICAL ADVICE). Do check with a doctor; you don't want to mess with rabies.
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Old Mar 4, 20, 7:42 pm
  #139  
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Originally Posted by deac83 View Post
An update: 7 days after the biting incident, the owner has not sent the rabies certificate to the health department.
I'd contact the authorities and try to have the dog's owner arrested.

Also, a definitive way to check whether the dog has rabies is to kill it and examine the brain. Just saying.....
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Old Mar 4, 20, 9:32 pm
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As the old adage goes: “If a dog bites the postman, it’s no news. If the postman bites the dog, now that’s news!”


apply freely to this situation
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Old Mar 4, 20, 11:23 pm
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Originally Posted by deac83 View Post
Wonder what the poster who suggested it's an over reaction to having a 'little' blood drawn by this animal. Police and health authorities brought in and this idiot is either lying about his dog or is a person that has not respect for others.
Since I have consistently stated that I would follow up with the rabies issues, you must not be talking about me!

To bring some sanity to this discussion,according to the CDC, there are between 1 - 3 human cases of rabies in the US every year. The chances of you getting rabies from a domesticated dog bite in the US is incredibly tiny. In comparison, lighning kills on average 49 people per year in the US according to the National Weather Service.

https://www.cdc.gov/rabies/location/...an_rabies.html

The paramedic did absolutely nothing to prevent you from getting rabies. I realize you are scared, and people on this board aren't helping that fear. If it bothers you this much, then call the local police where this occurred to make sure they follow up on this. I guess spending thousands of dollars on this in hopes you can sue someone is an option as well. But in reality, lawsuits are a big pain in the ***. Even if you get a judgment, there is no guarantee you can collect on it.

I grew up on a farm. Domesticated animals typically don't have issues with rabies. In our area, some wild skunks had rabies issues. If you had been bitten by a wild squirrel or something like that, then it might be worth getting the rabies shot. But this was a dog that was pampered enough to be in a hotel. I am not trying to be mean or uncaring. I am trying to add perspective.
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Old Mar 4, 20, 11:51 pm
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Originally Posted by deac83 View Post
Police and paramedics involved. Police report and the dog is quarantined for 10 days, to verify no rabies. Supposedly has shots but not confirmed in writing yet
Please get the rabies PEP and then sue for reimbursement. You have absolute cause to protect yourself. Sure there’s a low chance the dog is infected, but once rabies reaches the brain that’s it, PEP won’t work - you’re dead.

And once you’ve gone through PEP, if you’re ever bitten again boosters are all that’s required. I had to go through PEP a couple years ago after a bat flew into my bare arm at noon. Bats don’t usually fly around at noon, so that’s a red flag.
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Last edited by sleuth; Mar 5, 20 at 12:07 am
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Old Mar 5, 20, 1:52 am
  #143  
 
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OP, you need to speak to a lawyer as a matter of urgency. Also contact the police and try to have the owner arrested. Goodwill is out of the window at this stage.
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Old Mar 5, 20, 6:33 am
  #144  
 
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Although the odds of actually contracting rabies from someone's pet are minimal, it is still worth confirming that the owner's dog was vaccinated and completed the quarantine period.

Although I live in a suburban area, bats are quite common and pets who are outside a lot have at least a minimal possibility of being bitten. I remember a birthday party where a child was bitten by a rabbit that was part of a traveling petting zoo. Since the animals were kept outside, the health department required the rabbit's owner to submit the head along with the brain stem for testing. In this case, all that the OP needs is proof of vaccination and confirmation that the dog is still healthy to remove any doubt of infection.

Last edited by rny321; Mar 5, 20 at 10:57 am
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Old Mar 5, 20, 9:28 am
  #145  
 
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Originally Posted by Jaunts View Post
Since I have consistently stated that I would follow up with the rabies issues, you must not be talking about me!

To bring some sanity to this discussion,according to the CDC, there are between 1 - 3 human cases of rabies in the US every year. The chances of you getting rabies from a domesticated dog bite in the US is incredibly tiny. In comparison, lighning kills on average 49 people per year in the US according to the National Weather Service.

https://www.cdc.gov/rabies/location/...an_rabies.html

The paramedic did absolutely nothing to prevent you from getting rabies. I realize you are scared, and people on this board aren't helping that fear. If it bothers you this much, then call the local police where this occurred to make sure they follow up on this. I guess spending thousands of dollars on this in hopes you can sue someone is an option as well. But in reality, lawsuits are a big pain in the ***. Even if you get a judgment, there is no guarantee you can collect on it.

I grew up on a farm. Domesticated animals typically don't have issues with rabies. In our area, some wild skunks had rabies issues. If you had been bitten by a wild squirrel or something like that, then it might be worth getting the rabies shot. But this was a dog that was pampered enough to be in a hotel. I am not trying to be mean or uncaring. I am trying to add perspective.
This is not at all helpful to the OP. The best course of action is for the dog owner to provide necessary information, rabies vaccine and dog's health, to health department and OP to allay concerns of Rabies. It is not OP's responsibility to gauge the probability of rabies and act as if there's not chance of rabies. No victim should bear the cost (health, emotional, and tracking of dog health status) of the action of an irresponsible dog owner.

Since dog owner has not communicated anything for 7 days, it's time to haul his butt in and take care care of all necessary issues. Too bad dog owner was not issued a citation and fine.

If you're on a farm and stuff happens, you figure out what's best for you. If a dog bites a guest in a hotel, then deal with it appropriately. OP has done everything he possibly could to be civil. Dog owner has done nothing, so I wouldn't give him the benefit of the doubt at this time,

Last edited by CIT85; Mar 5, 20 at 9:34 am
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Old Mar 5, 20, 3:20 pm
  #146  
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Originally Posted by The_Bouncer View Post
OP, you need to speak to a lawyer as a matter of urgency.
Strongly disagree.

OP's situation is still developing. Also - OP has done all necessary work so far to preserve evidence. So for sure, OP needs a lawyer, but not in a urgent matter.

Originally Posted by The_Bouncer View Post
Also contact the police and try to have the owner arrested.
You don't call the shot. The police will do whatever it deems necessary.

Originally Posted by The_Bouncer View Post
Goodwill is out of the window at this stage.
Not true again. Just because someone is doing something negative, OP is not entitled to throw away the rule book. OP must still resolve the problem in good faith.
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Old Mar 5, 20, 3:57 pm
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Originally Posted by CIT85 View Post
This is not at all helpful to the OP. The best course of action is for the dog owner to provide necessary information, rabies vaccine and dog's health, to health department and OP to allay concerns of Rabies. It is not OP's responsibility to gauge the probability of rabies and act as if there's not chance of rabies. No victim should bear the cost (health, emotional, and tracking of dog health status) of the action of an irresponsible dog owner.

Since dog owner has not communicated anything for 7 days, it's time to haul his butt in and take care care of all necessary issues. Too bad dog owner was not issued a citation and fine.

If you're on a farm and stuff happens, you figure out what's best for you. If a dog bites a guest in a hotel, then deal with it appropriately. OP has done everything he possibly could to be civil. Dog owner has done nothing, so I wouldn't give him the benefit of the doubt at this time,
Actually, it might be better for the OP to be making decisions after talking with his doctor, not a lawyer. Rabies vaccines can be painful to the patient. If the OP has medical conditions that need to be considered, his Primary Care Physician would know about that, and would be in the best place to advise him on it.

It sounds like it's getting close to the end of the 10 day quarantine. When that ends, the local health department might close the case.

I realize there are a lot of people here angry at the dog owner. But if the OP spends $10,000 or more out of pocket to address this, he might not get reimbursed even if he does sue over it. That is why he should ask his doctor if it is worth the expense as he makes the decision.
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Old Mar 5, 20, 5:05 pm
  #148  
 
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I've had rabies shots twice. Except for the cost, which should be covered by insurance, the shots are no longer especially painful. The cost to whomever pays for them can be an order of magnitude lower if there is a primary care facility or clinic that can administer them. In one case, the county health department which insisted that I get these shots and followed up to make sure that I did so, suggested a walk-in clinic that charged my insurer a bit over $300 per shot. Obviously, the risks of infection are lower and the possibility of confirming if the offending animal is rabid is higher when a pet is involved compared to bats or other wild creatures.
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Last edited by rny321; Mar 5, 20 at 5:12 pm
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Old Mar 5, 20, 6:34 pm
  #149  
 
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Originally Posted by Jaunts View Post
Actually, it might be better for the OP to be making decisions after talking with his doctor, not a lawyer.
Of course, there is that saying that you don't know how seriously you've been injured until you talk with your attorney. Hahaha
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Old Mar 5, 20, 8:08 pm
  #150  
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Events of today.
- Health department called me back, as promise, this morning (kudos to them) and told me they have not received the rabies certificate from owner. Said the state health department suggested getting with PCP to make decisions about the shots and told me I needed to plan ahead since this is not standard stuff physicians have on hand. While the risk was low, she also pointed out that there are only two known cases of human surviving rabies. Said she would follow up at the end of the day no matter what.
- Made appointment with my PCP for the afternoon.
- Hour later Health Department called me to let me know they just received a fax of a valid rabies certificate for the dog, so I was off the hook on the shots
- Talked to my lawyer, who seems to believe the main issue is scaring from the bites, and that we should look at options once the wounds are healed. Also said the if I was a woman the bites on my finger would be a bigger issue for a suit. Certainly sounds like he doesn't see a clear legal path to chase something now.

Appreciate all the inputs on both sides. Thankfully, this is not turning into unnecessary medical procedures and costs.
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