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-   Marriott | Marriott Bonvoy (https://www.flyertalk.com/forum/marriott-marriott-bonvoy-766/)
-   -   Marriott to Eliminate Single-use Toiletry Bottles (https://www.flyertalk.com/forum/marriott-marriott-bonvoy/1984883-marriott-eliminate-single-use-toiletry-bottles.html)

Collierkr Aug 29, 19 1:45 pm


Originally Posted by JBord (Post 31467632)
Yes, I don't dispute that some good comes of it. But anyone thinking it's more than coincidental is fooling themselves. As soon as an even cheaper way to provide soap comes along, Marriott will find a reason to switch to that, and may go backwards in terms of environmentally friendly results. This time it worked out so they could put a good spin on it.

I don't like the dispensers, personally. So good for the environment, bad for me I guess. And likely very very good for Marriott's income statement.

sad that so many fail to see the good this type of approach will have for our planet. Sure it saves money because there is less waste.

Collierkr Aug 29, 19 1:47 pm


Originally Posted by WillBarrett_68 (Post 31469821)
I seriously doubt he needs them on a regular basis but we've all been caught on the road without one item or another, haven't we? It's usually easy enough to pop in a drug store but if the front desk has the item all the better.

I agree. If I need one I will ask. Putting them in every room all the time is a waste

GUWonder Aug 29, 19 1:53 pm


Originally Posted by Collierkr (Post 31470990)


sad that so many fail to see the good this type of approach will have for our planet. Sure it saves money because there is less waste.

It’s not necessarily all “good” for the planet. This kind of hotel move undermines Infection prevention, and undermined infection prevention leads to increased consumption of antibiotics and all the bad that can mean.

MSPeconomist Aug 29, 19 1:57 pm


Originally Posted by GUWonder (Post 31471024)


It’s not necessarily all “good” for the planet. This kind of hotel move undermines Infection prevention, and undermined infection prevention leads to increased consumption of antibiotics and all the bad that can mean.

Plus there's a lot of medical waste that must be incinerated and certainly not reused/recycled.

pinniped Aug 29, 19 1:59 pm

I'm generally warming up to the idea of eliminating the single-use bottles. The first time I experienced it, I was at Aloft (they've already been doing it for years). It smacked of cheapness - something the hotel was doing because their target guests were fairly recently removed from college campuses where these are common. To me it felt like being in a locker room.

But now, I will say that the waste argument is convincing, and I honestly don't really care where my shampoo comes from - big bottle or little bottle. I still think the cheapness angle is there, but I'll live with it if this is environmentally better.

I do hope that a bar of soap remains. Those can come paper-wrapped. I just prefer a bar of soap over the body wash liquids.

If Marriott wants to get serious about the environment, how about stopping the use of disposable utensils, cups, and plates at breakfast. Kind of hard for a hotel to try to spin an eco-message when I have to use tiny styrofoam cups to get some juice and water in the morning. I see everybody grabbing multiple cups (e.g. 2 cups to get maybe 8 ounces of juice) and it all gets thrown away. I know washing dishes isn't carbon-free, but it has to be better than the total carbon cost of the unnecessary manufacturing, shipping, and then throwing away hundreds of pounds of garbage per property per day.

Dave510 Aug 29, 19 2:04 pm

I would be a lot more receptive to the idea if Marriott were to also stop the use of plastic cups and use proper glasses. It would certainly move the narrative away from cost cutting, and also further reduce the environmental impact.

As is, Marriott is simply choosing the cheapest option, regardless of impact to the environment.

WillBarrett_68 Aug 29, 19 2:08 pm


Originally Posted by GUWonder (Post 31471024)


It’s not necessarily all “good” for the planet. This kind of hotel move undermines Infection prevention,

what

are you like rubbing the shampoo bottle on your open sores???

Zeeb Aug 29, 19 2:14 pm


Originally Posted by Antarius (Post 31470846)
We get it, many of us dont think this is a problem worth worrying about.

How easy is it to do the same in a mini and drop it on the cart? Leave it in the room "untouched"? Extremely.

Anything is possible, but stop pretending there is no functional difference in both ease and opportunity in tampering with this

https://i.imgur.com/Pjl9Idr.jpg?1

vs this.

https://i.imgur.com/3qbz9NV.jpg

GUWonder Aug 29, 19 2:20 pm


Originally Posted by WillBarrett_68 (Post 31471069)
what

are you like rubbing the shampoo bottle on your open sores???

No, but the suggestion about rubbing open sores or the body in general after touching the wall-mounted dispensers just goes toward the point that the wall-mounted toiletries will be a pathogen-spreading vector and likely lead to some increased use of antibiotics and all the bad that the overuse of antibiotics means for the planet. ;)

WillBarrett_68 Aug 29, 19 2:22 pm


Originally Posted by GUWonder (Post 31471114)
[left]

No, but your suggestion about rubbing your open sores just goes toward the point that the wall-mounted toiletries will be a pathogen-spreading vector

nope

you're literally imagining this. nobody is going to catch ebola from shampoo dispensers

stimpy Aug 29, 19 2:41 pm


Originally Posted by stimpy (Post 31465713)
So Marriott is copying IHG? Here is the IHG thread from July. https://www.flyertalk.com/forum/inte...ll-brands.html

Only 115 posts. I am sure that this forum can beat that when it comes to toilet talk!

131 posts in a very short time. I knew we could do it!

GUWonder Aug 29, 19 2:43 pm


Originally Posted by WillBarrett_68 (Post 31471121)
nope

you're literally imagining this. nobody is going to catch ebola from shampoo dispensers

I am not the one imagining and introducing the narrative of catching Ebola from shampoo dispensers. That all has come from your post.

Ebola is a virus, so what does Ebola have to do with my comment about compromised infection prevention resulting in increased antibiotic use? Note to those who may not know this: antibiotic medication are not anti-viral medications. Try a different disease. ;)

cova Aug 29, 19 2:58 pm

The current small bottles have a seal on them. Things like the mouth wash has a piece of clear tape sealing the top. If I come across a container in the bathroom that was already open I don't use it. Again - that is why they are sealed. What keeps someone from putting something in the bottle.

Some European hotels I have stayed some time ago had dispensers but they were something you squeezed rather than pump - and in some cases they were in a sealed bag that got pierced when put in the holder rack. So not reused or refilled. Just a larger pouch than the small bottles.

Zeeb Aug 29, 19 3:54 pm


Originally Posted by cova (Post 31471261)
The current small bottles have a seal on them. Things like the mouth wash has a piece of clear tape sealing the top. If I come across a container in the bathroom that was already open I don't use it. Again - that is why they are sealed. What keeps someone from putting something in the bottle.

Some European hotels I have stayed some time ago had dispensers but they were something you squeezed rather than pump - and in some cases they were in a sealed bag that got pierced when put in the holder rack. So not reused or refilled. Just a larger pouch than the small bottles.

I'd consider that to be a way better compromise for getting rid of single use toiletries than having a refillable pump bottle of shampoo or body wash in the room.

CPH-Flyer Aug 29, 19 4:08 pm


Originally Posted by GUWonder (Post 31470773)


Given the following

https://www.sciencedaily.com/release...0617142534.htm

it’s not a big leap to expect that some people get sick from pathogens picked up from hotel remote controls.


Kirsch warns that this study is preliminary and is limited by the sample size, which included only 3 rooms in each state and 19 surfaces within each hotel room, but hopes that it is just the beginning of a body of research that could offer a scientific basis to hotel housekeeping.
The study is more about the cleaning process there is no realm indication that the level of contamination is at risk leves just because something has the highest level of contaminants does it mean that it poses a risk? If I go in to an industrial clean room, I am surely the highest carrier of contaminants (and I do poses a risk to the quale of the production) but does that make me a health risk to other people?

So it is a leap, while maybe not big, that I'd like to see some medical literature document.


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