FlyerTalk Forums

FlyerTalk Forums (https://www.flyertalk.com/forum/index.php)
-   Marriott | Marriott Bonvoy (https://www.flyertalk.com/forum/marriott-marriott-bonvoy-766/)
-   -   Marriott to Eliminate Single-use Toiletry Bottles (https://www.flyertalk.com/forum/marriott-marriott-bonvoy/1984883-marriott-eliminate-single-use-toiletry-bottles.html)

JBord Sep 1, 19 7:31 am


Originally Posted by Antarius (Post 31477625)
This. We don't know for sure. As a result, we have to either take it on faith or perform a cursory inspection and make a determination based on that.

there is no way to know for sure that the linens were washed at a high enough temperature to kill everything or that there isnt legionnaires disease in the HVAC. Both things I dont worry about, but seem to be far more likely to get you sick than soap dispensers.

This is true. But at least we can believe that hotels have safe policies and procedures and that employees follow them, and that some things are at least subject to periodic inspections.

I'm nowhere near a germophobe - quite the opposite actually. I'm a believer in the "what doesn't kill me makes me stronger" philosophy. I'm not going to refuse to use the dispensers or bring my own soap. To me, the point about tampering and germs is just that Marriott is making it easier for those with twisted minds to tamper with this liquid soap crap than with a wrapped bar of soap. And people WILL do that. I wouldn't want to know that the room I'm staying in was last occupied by a group of college kids, because the odds of some type of "prank" go up considerably.

But really, for me, it's just a matter of not liking body wash more than anything. Marriott is moving to an inferior product, to save money, with the spin that it's "green".

Or, as some people suggest, we can just skip washing with soap all together. The ultimate environmentally friendly solution!

GUWonder Sep 1, 19 8:31 am

Save the world by eliminating private bathrooms in hotel rooms and let everyone share the same facilities with wall-mounted toiletry dispensers, just like at some old school dormitories. ;)

CPH-Flyer Sep 1, 19 9:10 am


Originally Posted by GUWonder (Post 31479115)


It works when someone moves. I’ve seen hotels keep the bathroom light/power sockets tied to motion detector-based activation since doing it in the rest of the hotel room got complaints during testing.

The motion detectors can activate the lights and/or the power. And the duration for which any given motion keeps the power running and/or lights on can vary.

I know the basic concept of a motion sensor, thank you. :D

I was more wondering how it would work for aircon and outlets for the whole room while sleeping. But if only lights and outlets in the bathroom it makes more sense. Most office space has motion sensors on the lights, though sometimes it makes people jump in weird ways of their desk is in an odd angle for the sensor.

GUWonder Sep 1, 19 9:24 am


Originally Posted by CPH-Flyer (Post 31479374)
I know the basic concept of a motion sensor, thank you. :D

I was more wondering how it would work for aircon and outlets for the whole room while sleeping. But if only lights and outlets in the bathroom it makes more sense. Most office space has motion sensors on the lights, though sometimes it makes people jump in weird ways of their desk is in an odd angle for the sensor.

Nearly all people move somewhat when sleeping. So that’s how it works.

For the part of the hotel rooms beyond the bathrooms (the latter of which had their own time limits for their own motion detector power activation/deactivation triggers), if no motion had been registered in the trigger area for X minutes/hours, the air condition and the rest of the power for the room was to be throttled.

I’ve been in hotels’ bathrooms where the lights went out due to the the motion detection set-up for providing/cutting electricity. I move around enough in my sleep to not have had a problem with the motion detection-related cut-offs to the hotel rooms where it was trialed.

Cathay Dragon 666 Sep 1, 19 9:32 am

Funny how "save the world" cut-backs never means reduced fees. I never thought I would say this, but at this rate of service reduction, AirBnB is looking better and better everyday.

CPH-Flyer Sep 1, 19 2:46 pm


Originally Posted by GUWonder (Post 31479407)


Nearly all people move somewhat when sleeping. So that’s how it works.

For the part of the hotel rooms beyond the bathrooms (the latter of which had their own time limits for their own motion detector power activation/deactivation triggers), if no motion had been registered in the trigger area for X minutes/hours, the air condition and the rest of the power for the room was to be throttled.

I’ve been in hotels’ bathrooms where the lights went out due to the the motion detection set-up for providing/cutting electricity. I move around enough in my sleep to not have had a problem with the motion detection-related cut-offs to the hotel rooms where it was trialed.

I usually don't move much at night, so I'd loose airxon. Depending on when I am it may not be a disaster. But imagine that in Hong Kong in August...

Reminds me of a former work place in Denmark, all lights were on motion sensor, but there were no motion sensors in the restrooms and absolutely zero natural lights in the restrooms either. Sometimes one would end up having to navigate from the stall through the space with the sinks, before getting out to an area with a motion sensor. With absolute zero light.
​​​​​

sanfran8080 Sep 1, 19 9:47 pm

As a titanium I’m banking with this decision. These portable soap/shampoo dispenser are very hard to keep clean. I complain every time I see them dirty. Mgt awards me with 10k points as an apology. So far I banked 70k points. Get on board fellas. Thanks Marriott

nacho Sep 2, 19 4:23 am


Originally Posted by sanfran8080 (Post 31481060)
As a titanium I’m banking with this decision. These portable soap/shampoo dispenser are very hard to keep clean. I complain every time I see them dirty. Mgt awards me with 10k points as an apology. So far I banked 70k points. Get on board fellas. Thanks Marriott

Have seen tons of disgusting ones with mold in throughout Europe - there are various types, I think the ones that they refill the liquid is the worst. I like the Japanese ones and those you replace a whole tube after it's finished.

10k points compensation is generous.

CPH-Flyer Sep 2, 19 4:40 am


Originally Posted by nacho (Post 31481668)
Have seen tons of disgusting ones with mold in throughout Europe - there are various types, I think the ones that they refill the liquid is the worst. I like the Japanese ones and those you replace a whole tube after it's finished.

10k points compensation is generous.

I must be relatively lucky, in the Courtyard and Four Points where I have encountered the dispensers so far, everything has looked nice and clean. These are mainly US locations.

christianj Sep 2, 19 4:56 am

I’m not generally opposed to the wall mounted dispenser BUT housekeeping needs to be taught to put the right liquid in the dispensers! I was just at the Moxy FRA and both of the dispensers in the shower contained conditioner and there was no shampoo/shower gel. Washing your hair and cleaning your body just doesn’t work with just conditioner! Totally annoying!

kaizen7 Sep 2, 19 9:53 am


Originally Posted by christianj (Post 31481714)
I’m not generally opposed to the wall mounted dispenser BUT housekeeping needs to be taught to put the right liquid in the dispensers! I was just at the Moxy FRA and both of the dispensers in the shower contained conditioner and there was no shampoo/shower gel. Washing your hair and cleaning your body just doesn’t work with just conditioner! Totally annoying!

Sometimes housekeeping stocks the room with correct amount of those single use bottles ... all of them are conditioners as well :D

quinella66 Sep 2, 19 10:00 am

Certainly the driver behind this it cost savings that just happens to align with environmental PR. Same was true when they tried to get guests to reuse towels.

Soap dispensers on the wall give it a feel like a public restroom which is not great for high end properties. If I’m staying at an aloft that is already the case, and understandable but I can’t see top properties doing that. I noticed the St Regis bottles are bigger even now so maybe they will stay. The bottles also help to market and sell the better products - I remember taking the leftover bliss from a W hotel and then we liked it enough to order it online.

if they do this for the lower end properties like courtyard, Fairfield, etc. then that would be the majority of the cost and environment savings. If people are paying north of $500 for a room, they probably don’t want a common use dispenser or bottle.

EuropeanPete Sep 2, 19 10:08 am


Originally Posted by bhrubin (Post 31477114)
I love you. :D:D:D

Hysteria and FlyerTalk go hand in hand for far too many. It tends to come from those who also are terrified of travel to Mexico, are upset the lounge isn't open 24/7, believe they are entitled to the Presidential Suite upgrade as a Gold elite, think the hotel owes them compensation after the power goes out because of a storm, are furious that they can't get Coca-Cola products, etc.

If I drunk Coke I would probably be a bit unhappy about the Pepsi thing tbh, but I otherwise wholly endorse this post.

C17PSGR Sep 2, 19 10:28 am

I remain skeptical that there will be any cost savings as the increase in labor cost will offset any savings from the bottles.

As a practical matter, a lot of environmental initiatives make our lives more difficult

1. For those who are concerned about climate change, one way of reducing energy usage is to limit flexibility in setting temperature in rooms. Many LEED buildings don't permit people to change temperatures.
2. Try to get a fast flow of water in California or Arizona
3. Many places are banning water bottles

SPG was the industry leader in all these areas with a focus on using less energy and getting rid of plastic. As for the plastic, its good to see Marriott adopting SPG policies.

GUWonder Sep 2, 19 3:25 pm


Originally Posted by kaizen7 (Post 31482553)
Sometimes housekeeping stocks the room with correct amount of those single use bottles ... all of them are conditioners as well :D

But they tend to be labeled properly more so than the wall-mounted dispensers with multiple toiletry types.

wobbly wings Sep 2, 19 3:32 pm

I am in favour of this to reduce the plastic footprint, but staff do need to monitor those bottles. I am finding them empty way too often, even at high end Residence Inns, even if they have see through on the side. I even tried to develop a messaging signal (does one exist, like with towels?) to signal the bottle is empty but removing the dispenser thing and leaving it on the side. Nothing. Bottle still empty. I always travel with a tiny spare one in my bag so not a big deal, but it should not happen.

Antarius Sep 2, 19 3:42 pm


Originally Posted by C17PSGR (Post 31482672)
I remain skeptical that there will be any cost savings as the increase in labor cost will offset any savings from the bottles.

As a practical matter, a lot of environmental initiatives make our lives more difficult

1. For those who are concerned about climate change, one way of reducing energy usage is to limit flexibility in setting temperature in rooms. Many LEED buildings don't permit people to change temperatures.
2. Try to get a fast flow of water in California or Arizona
3. Many places are banning water bottles

SPG was the industry leader in all these areas with a focus on using less energy and getting rid of plastic. As for the plastic, its good to see Marriott adopting SPG policies.

How will this take more labor? I cannot see this adding any material time to housekeeping.

GUWonder Sep 2, 19 4:03 pm


Originally Posted by Antarius (Post 31483566)
How will this take more labor? I cannot see this adding any material time to housekeeping.

It will take less labor on average, and that will be part and parcel of an increased likelihood of hotel guests encountering empty or broken wall-mounted toiletry dispensers.

Neither Marriott nor Starwood have been industry leaders in being “environmentally-friendly” when it comes to cutting plastics or anything else — except in them being larger mess makers and thus having more to cut and more money to save. The real “leaders” in this kind of hotel cost-cutting under cover of “save the world”? Hotels in Scandinavia. Last night for me, this meant having a Scandinavian hotel room stuck at 27.5C-29C while the outside temp was far more pleasant and under 72F. But having windows that open is apparently bad for the environment, violated area building code/permit, and/or was ruled out by hotel developers for some other reasons. And adjusting the AC was capped at max +/- 2.5C. :rolleyes: The nearby AirBNB listings are looking more favorable.

CPH-Flyer Sep 2, 19 4:53 pm


Originally Posted by GUWonder (Post 31483624)


It will take less labor on average, and that will be part and parcel of an increased likelihood of hotel guests encountering empty or broken wall-mounted toiletry dispensers.

Neither Marriott nor Starwood have been industry leaders in being “environmentally-friendly” when it comes to cutting plastics or anything else — except in them being larger mess makers and thus having more to cut and more money to save. The real “leaders” in this kind of hotel cost-cutting under cover of “save the world”? Hotels in Scandinavia. Last night for me, this meant having a Scandinavian hotel room stuck at 27.5C-29C while the outside temp was far more pleasant and under 72F. But having windows that open is apparently bad for the environment, violated area building code/permit, and/or was ruled out by hotel developers for some other reasons. And adjusting the AC was capped at max +/- 2.5C. :rolleyes: The nearby AirBNB listings are looking more favorable.

Proper aircon is still not a standard thing in hotels in Scandinavia, nor anywhere else for that matter. I don't necessarily think that is/was driven by environmental concerns. More driven by a "we don't need it more than a few days a year, so we will just suffer through those" thinking. The AirBNB will have windows that open, but very likely no aircon whatsoever.

GUWonder Sep 2, 19 5:32 pm


Originally Posted by CPH-Flyer (Post 31483744)
Proper aircon is still not a standard thing in hotels in Scandinavia, nor anywhere else for that matter. I don't necessarily think that is/was driven by environmental concerns. More driven by a "we don't need it more than a few days a year, so we will just suffer through those" thinking. The AirBNB will have windows that open, but very likely no aircon whatsoever.

AC is not a standard thing for hotels anywhere? That is news to me.

I am very familiar with Scandinavia, with residential properties in Scandinavia, and with Scandinavian hotels and with most such hotels and homes in the region not having any AC; but most such hotels and homes have room windows that open, while the hotels that don’t have any open-able room windows do have AC of sorts. I have stayed at over 100 major brand hotels in the Scandinavia region and have had thousands of nights in the area, so I know what to expect — including with regard to the short-comings of hotel housekeeping when hotels go from single-use toiletries to wall-mounted dispenser toiletries in the hotel rooms.

The nearby AirBNB listings are looking more favorable from a room temperature perspective and also from the perspective of having no wall-mounted toiletry dispensers. :D

CPH-Flyer Sep 2, 19 6:15 pm


Originally Posted by GUWonder (Post 31483823)


AC is not a standard thing for hotels anywhere? That is news to me.

I am very familiar with Scandinavia, with residential properties in Scandinavia, and with Scandinavian hotels and with most such hotels and homes in the region not having any AC; but most such hotels and homes have room windows that open, while the hotels that don’t have any open-able room windows do have AC of sorts. I have stayed at over 100 major brand hotels in the Scandinavia region and have had thousands of nights in the area, so I know what to expect — including with regard to the short-comings of hotel housekeeping when hotels go from single-use toiletries to wall-mounted dispenser toiletries in the hotel rooms.

The nearby AirBNB listings are looking more favorable from a room temperature perspective and also from the perspective of having no wall-mounted toiletry dispensers. :D

hehe slight lack of clarity in my typing. :) Meant to say "nor anywhere else in Scandinavia" But hey ho, sometimes the fingers are not following the thinking.

Most hotels do have aircon of sorts indeed, but not a proper one that let's you freely adjust temperatures. As I said, mostly on the argument that it is never hot enough in Scandinavia to matter. Well, surprise it is hot enough to matter, and getting so more frequently it could seem. Or Scandinavians are just getting more sensitive to heat.

freeflyin Sep 2, 19 6:54 pm


Originally Posted by jrich7970 (Post 31476911)
But you don't have to use these products. As a 100+ nights a year person as well...if I had an issue with these dispensers, I would just bring my own. And I might start. A little bottle of shampoo lasts me more than the 5 days I'm there. So, filling one up and tossing it in my bag before I leave isn't exactly a big deal.

Just my opinion. Others may differ.

I do have a problem with the dispensers and I do generally bring my own.

If more travelers begin to bring their own, Marriott saves even more than just eliminating the small bottles. Now they will be using less product overall

Antarius Sep 2, 19 10:56 pm


Originally Posted by GUWonder (Post 31483624)


It will take less labor on average, and that will be part and parcel of an increased likelihood of hotel guests encountering empty or broken wall-mounted toiletry dispensers.

Neither Marriott nor Starwood have been industry leaders in being “environmentally-friendly” when it comes to cutting plastics or anything else — except in them being larger mess makers and thus having more to cut and more money to save. The real “leaders” in this kind of hotel cost-cutting under cover of “save the world”? Hotels in Scandinavia. Last night for me, this meant having a Scandinavian hotel room stuck at 27.5C-29C while the outside temp was far more pleasant and under 72F. But having windows that open is apparently bad for the environment, violated area building code/permit, and/or was ruled out by hotel developers for some other reasons. And adjusting the AC was capped at max +/- 2.5C. :rolleyes: The nearby AirBNB listings are looking more favorable.

How? Just like I am unclear on how this adds more labor, I also do not understand how this results in empty or broken dispensers. Broken, I can see occasionally, but empty - how is this any more difficult than any other task housekeeping does?

I do agree that Marriott has done a piss poor job on eliminating plastics and their "redesigned" room service is environmentally horrendous. But one wrong does not mean they need to do more. I'd hope that they fix the waste issue next.

GUWonder Sep 2, 19 10:57 pm


Originally Posted by Antarius (Post 31484420)
How? Just like I am unclear on how this adds more labor, I also do not understand how this results in empty or broken dispensers. Broken, I can see occasionally, but empty - how is this any more difficult than any other task housekeeping does?

I do agree that Marriott has done a piss poor job on eliminating plastics and their "redesigned" room service is environmentally horrendous. But one wrong does not mean they need to do more. I'd hope that they fix the waste issue next.

​​​​
How it happens (i.e. the cause) matters less to customers than that it happens — as the failure is not the customers’ as much as it’s the hotels’.

The hotels’ failure of all toiletry provisioning in the hotel rooms happens to hit more frequently and a lot harder after the switch to only wall-mounted toiletry dispensers than before such switch. If you deal a lot with process engineering labor-intensive activities, you would not be as surprised by the outcome and maybe you would blame the lack of QA checks. But the QA checks being more needed or needing to be more complex (than before) is generally an indicator that failure outcomes are not going to be less likely on average (nor less extreme on average) than before this Marriott move.


Originally Posted by freeflyin (Post 31483981)
I do have a problem with the dispensers and I do generally bring my own.

If more travelers begin to bring their own, Marriott saves even more than just eliminating the small bottles. Now they will be using less product overall

That is a possibility. Along with that is the following possibility: that hotel guests use the hotel toiletry dispensers to create their own toiletries to take away in whole or in part. That this takes place is why there are sometimes signs placed next to such hotel room dispensers stating that guests are able to buy bottles of the toiletries from the front desk or online or something else like that.

If people really care to see a lot less toiletry and other plastic waste, then way more people should be hostile to the TSA (and its European counterparts) for the size-based restrictions on liquids/gels/aerosols as part of cabin baggage.

JBord Sep 3, 19 6:25 am


Originally Posted by C17PSGR (Post 31482672)
I remain skeptical that there will be any cost savings as the increase in labor cost will offset any savings from the bottles.

How do you figure? Replacing liquid in dispensers takes significantly longer time than placing new bottles? Or are you factoring in all the calls to housekeeping for broken, empty, or moldy/disgusting dispensers?

If, in either case, it resulted in more labor time, I'd argue that it's just opportunity cost and not a true expense for the hotels. I can't imagine anyone is going to hire additional staff or allow additional overtime just because of the dispensers. In fact, if that were the case, I'm pretty sure corporate would have heard it from owners. It's a telling sign that we aren't hearing owners fight the change -- validates the argument that they're saving money.

Dr. HFH Sep 3, 19 9:28 am

A single data point, FWIW: A couple of days ago, I spent a night at the Aloft Bangkok. Two dispensers on the wall in the shower, one for combined shampoo/conditioner, the other for shower gel. Both were spotless, no mold, either. The tops were locked, you need some type of key mechanism to open them. Obviously they aren't completely tamper-proof, but the point isn't to make them into bomb-resistant containers. The point is to discourage the casual miscreant. Anyone who is really determined can break them open, but I see someone that determined going for a bigger target than the shampoo dispenser in an individual room in an Aloft, fundamentally a lower priced chain.

cmd320 Sep 3, 19 11:06 am


Originally Posted by chipmaster (Post 31477400)
You really sure they change linens, maid sure could save some time and effort just making the bed, get her shift done earlier, management push to save on a lot of water and soap too.

Sure they washed the dishes,lots of things you can conspire, you heard about the things that happen or are speculated to happen in China?

Yes. It's pretty easy to tell whether linens have been slept in vs. cleaned and pressed.


Originally Posted by Dr. HFH (Post 31485779)
A single data point, FWIW: A couple of days ago, I spent a night at the Aloft Bangkok. Two dispensers on the wall in the shower, one for combined shampoo/conditioner, the other for shower gel. Both were spotless, no mold, either. The tops were locked, you need some type of key mechanism to open them. Obviously they aren't completely tamper-proof, but the point isn't to make them into bomb-resistant containers. The point is to discourage the casual miscreant. Anyone who is really determined can break them open, but I see someone that determined going for a bigger target than the shampoo dispenser in an individual room in an Aloft, fundamentally a lower priced chain.

This is pretty standard for Aloft. That combined shampoo/conditioner crap is useless too.

C17PSGR Sep 3, 19 12:46 pm


Originally Posted by JBord (Post 31485168)
How do you figure? Replacing liquid in dispensers takes significantly longer time than placing new bottles? Or are you factoring in all the calls to housekeeping for broken, empty, or moldy/disgusting dispensers?

If, in either case, it resulted in more labor time, I'd argue that it's just opportunity cost and not a true expense for the hotels. I can't imagine anyone is going to hire additional staff or allow additional overtime just because of the dispensers. In fact, if that were the case, I'm pretty sure corporate would have heard it from owners. It's a telling sign that we aren't hearing owners fight the change -- validates the argument that they're saving money.

Hotel housekeeping is very metrics driven in any large/corporate property.

Its been a while since I've worked on production analytics/time and motion studies but it seems to me that in the current situation, the housekeeping staff likely can replace the single use plastic in seconds when cleaning the sink. In contrast, installing dispensers on the wall incurs an upfront labor cost. Replacing and cleaning the dispensers in the shower will take longer than placing daily bottles -- think of the time to enter the shower/tub to clean and replace the bottles versus putting them on the sink. Replacing isn't daily but cleaning is. Then the unlocking/replacing is certainly in the minutes, rather than seconds, albeit not on a daily basis. Additionally, I'd factor in a slight increase in workplace injuries since a housekeeper is going to trip occasionally when entered the tub to replace these. And that doesn't take into account the cost of negotiating with the unions in Hawaii, NYC, SF, etc. who will seek to negotiate something over this or grieve the change in working conditions. And, if Marriott does the right think by refilling the bottles rather than tossing them, costs will be even higher.

So, while I'm not going to do a time and motion study and would be a bit rusty, I'm fairly confident this increases housekeeping time, which is a variable cost since housekeepers are not usually on a fixed hourly week. This definitely won't be a money saver.

Getting rid of plastic bottles is the way of the world. The problem, of course, is that getting rid of them in North America, Europe, Australia, and Japan won't really solve the plastic bottle problem.

JBord Sep 3, 19 1:24 pm


Originally Posted by C17PSGR (Post 31486612)

So, while I'm not going to do a time and motion study and would be a bit rusty, I'm fairly confident this increases housekeeping time, which is a variable cost since housekeepers are not usually on a fixed hourly week. This definitely won't be a money saver.

Getting rid of plastic bottles is the way of the world. The problem, of course, is that getting rid of them in North America, Europe, Australia, and Japan won't really solve the plastic bottle problem.

I'm sure you have more expertise in this than I, but I would hope they're already entering and cleaning the tub on a daily basis anyway. You're probably right that replacing a dispenser takes longer -- but even if it's 10x longer, they may only do it 10% of the time compared to daily bottles. Even if it takes an extra 2 mins per room per day, I'd guess they just make up that time somewhere else to fit it into the daily shift. When tasked with extra work but no more pay, it can be surprising how much more efficient an individual worker can become. And then you have the cost savings of the product itself, as there is theoretically less wasted soap.

And I agree with your last sentence. Not only will it not solve the problem, it's questionable if it will even significantly impact it. But I'm generally in favor of starting somewhere as long as it isn't outweighed by the negative outcomes.

GUWonder Sep 3, 19 1:34 pm

People may become more efficient or sloppier when asked to do more work for the same allotment of time and/or money.

Given my experience with these kind of hotel transitions to wall-mounted toiletry dispensers, I would say the hotels/housekeepers have become sloppier and that is why I encounter worse hotel toiletry-related service failures now than ever before.

Some more may start to carry a soap bar or two on their trips and maybe start with complaining and asking for goodwill gestures /compensation for toiletry-related service failures in their rooms, whether or not impacted by the toiletry-related service failures encountered.

brittex Sep 3, 19 6:37 pm

My wall dispenser at a Marriott property
I don’t like this move. I will not use wall dispensers.


brittex Sep 3, 19 6:44 pm

https://cimg6.ibsrv.net/gimg/www.fly...0fb5cbe03.jpeg
here you go - not nice

melissaru Sep 3, 19 7:45 pm

What the hell is that?! Looks like a soap dispenser I just used in the ATL airport! Was this just a regular, full-service Marriott?

melissaru Sep 3, 19 8:00 pm


Originally Posted by quinella66 (Post 31482581)
Certainly the driver behind this it cost savings that just happens to align with environmental PR. Same was true when they tried to get guests to reuse towels.

Soap dispensers on the wall give it a feel like a public restroom which is not great for high end properties. If I’m staying at an aloft that is already the case, and understandable but I can’t see top properties doing that. I noticed the St Regis bottles are bigger even now so maybe they will stay. The bottles also help to market and sell the better products - I remember taking the leftover bliss from a W hotel and then we liked it enough to order it online.

if they do this for the lower end properties like courtyard, Fairfield, etc. then that would be the majority of the cost and environment savings. If people are paying north of $500 for a room, they probably don’t want a common use dispenser or bottle.

Agree completely on the last point. Recently stayed at the JW Parq Vancouver for $500-plus a night. Lovely room and hotel. Walked into the bathroom and suddenly it felt like I was at the municipal pool. I don't care if they were Molton Brown products. I'd prefer to not have them bolted to the shower wall when I'm spending $2k for a long weekend (also, how are these refilled if not constantly from the top? They're just regular screw-top pump bottles.)?

brittex Sep 3, 19 8:05 pm

This was a Four Points
Which I otherwise like quite a lot

Dr. HFH Sep 3, 19 9:14 pm


Originally Posted by brittex (Post 31487641)
My wall dispenser at a Marriott property
I don’t like this move. I will not use wall dispensers.


Originally Posted by brittex (Post 31487848)
This was a Four Points


Originally Posted by brittex (Post 31487848)

Which I otherwise like quite a lot

OK. For starters, it's a 4P, not a StR. Looking at your photo, I see no dirt or mold. It's the natural little bit of extra soap, that last drop which is sometimes smeared as someone pulls their hand away. Is it perfectly clean? Nah. Is it up to standards? Undoubtedly not. But you had to bend down to look up at the dispenser to see it, didn't you. I can't view this as a war crime. I agree, it shouldn't be that way. But in the comprehensive catalogue of theoretically possible housekeeping failures, this particular one really isn't terribly high on the list, given that there is no mold, no dirt. At least not on my list.

GUWonder Sep 3, 19 10:47 pm

From that photo, it’s not possible to accurately determine that there is no mold or dirt. Whether such dispenser is worse than bathroom shower-heads — especially ones with plastic on or around the nozzles/shower-heads — is a point to consider, whether it’s at a Four Points or at a St Regis/Luxury Collection.

About the notion that luxury hotels should be contributing less per guest to “save the world” measures than more mass market hotels, that just seems to be the kind of thing that deserves to be awarded a prize in hypocrisy and recognized as a travel-related version of NIMBY attitudes.

storewanderer Sep 3, 19 11:02 pm

Any service failure relating to these dispensers that is not resolved immediately by the property providing product (be it new dispensers or the old single use bottles), and I will be demanding some sort of small compensation and filing complaints with the corporate office.

The only way this stupid move will ever be somehow at least countered with solutions (single use bottles upon request) will be if people complain when service failures take place.

I think proper providing of adequate shampoo in a functioning dispenser or single use bottle is rather important in a hotel room at a mid market or upper end hotel chain. This isn't Motel 6.

GUWonder Sep 4, 19 12:23 am

The hotels forgetting to put soap in the refillable dispensers may hit a lot more hotel customers at the wrong time and worse than the hotels forgetting the shampoo.

Just wait until an adult or baby diaper change goes wrong in a Marriott room where the soap dispenser was useless for the hotel customers when it was most needed.

Word of wisdom to hotel room occupants: check that the soap dispenser works and seems to be soap before it’s a bit too late. Why? Because the hotels will fail you more when it comes to refillable soap dispensers than when it comes to wrapped soap bars in the hotel bathrooms.

eccentricfusion Sep 4, 19 12:49 am

The W Bangkok had a good approach with small single use bottles for regular rooms and larger (4oz and 8oz bottles) for suites. I ended up taking a bunch home since my wife enjoys Bliss products and it makes us think about the W Bangkok every time we use those products at home. Great for the environment, but I still think they should offer larger bottles to take, especially for the luxury brands, since it is one of those things that make you think about the hotel and going back.


All times are GMT -6. The time now is 1:30 pm.


This site is owned, operated, and maintained by MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. Copyright © 2018 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Designated trademarks are the property of their respective owners.