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-   -   Marriott to Eliminate Single-use Toiletry Bottles (https://www.flyertalk.com/forum/marriott-marriott-bonvoy/1984883-marriott-eliminate-single-use-toiletry-bottles.html)

Collierkr Aug 29, 19 1:45 pm


Originally Posted by JBord (Post 31467632)
Yes, I don't dispute that some good comes of it. But anyone thinking it's more than coincidental is fooling themselves. As soon as an even cheaper way to provide soap comes along, Marriott will find a reason to switch to that, and may go backwards in terms of environmentally friendly results. This time it worked out so they could put a good spin on it.

I don't like the dispensers, personally. So good for the environment, bad for me I guess. And likely very very good for Marriott's income statement.

sad that so many fail to see the good this type of approach will have for our planet. Sure it saves money because there is less waste.

Collierkr Aug 29, 19 1:47 pm


Originally Posted by WillBarrett_68 (Post 31469821)
I seriously doubt he needs them on a regular basis but we've all been caught on the road without one item or another, haven't we? It's usually easy enough to pop in a drug store but if the front desk has the item all the better.

I agree. If I need one I will ask. Putting them in every room all the time is a waste

GUWonder Aug 29, 19 1:53 pm


Originally Posted by Collierkr (Post 31470990)


sad that so many fail to see the good this type of approach will have for our planet. Sure it saves money because there is less waste.

It’s not necessarily all “good” for the planet. This kind of hotel move undermines Infection prevention, and undermined infection prevention leads to increased consumption of antibiotics and all the bad that can mean.

MSPeconomist Aug 29, 19 1:57 pm


Originally Posted by GUWonder (Post 31471024)


It’s not necessarily all “good” for the planet. This kind of hotel move undermines Infection prevention, and undermined infection prevention leads to increased consumption of antibiotics and all the bad that can mean.

Plus there's a lot of medical waste that must be incinerated and certainly not reused/recycled.

pinniped Aug 29, 19 1:59 pm

I'm generally warming up to the idea of eliminating the single-use bottles. The first time I experienced it, I was at Aloft (they've already been doing it for years). It smacked of cheapness - something the hotel was doing because their target guests were fairly recently removed from college campuses where these are common. To me it felt like being in a locker room.

But now, I will say that the waste argument is convincing, and I honestly don't really care where my shampoo comes from - big bottle or little bottle. I still think the cheapness angle is there, but I'll live with it if this is environmentally better.

I do hope that a bar of soap remains. Those can come paper-wrapped. I just prefer a bar of soap over the body wash liquids.

If Marriott wants to get serious about the environment, how about stopping the use of disposable utensils, cups, and plates at breakfast. Kind of hard for a hotel to try to spin an eco-message when I have to use tiny styrofoam cups to get some juice and water in the morning. I see everybody grabbing multiple cups (e.g. 2 cups to get maybe 8 ounces of juice) and it all gets thrown away. I know washing dishes isn't carbon-free, but it has to be better than the total carbon cost of the unnecessary manufacturing, shipping, and then throwing away hundreds of pounds of garbage per property per day.

Dave510 Aug 29, 19 2:04 pm

I would be a lot more receptive to the idea if Marriott were to also stop the use of plastic cups and use proper glasses. It would certainly move the narrative away from cost cutting, and also further reduce the environmental impact.

As is, Marriott is simply choosing the cheapest option, regardless of impact to the environment.

WillBarrett_68 Aug 29, 19 2:08 pm


Originally Posted by GUWonder (Post 31471024)


It’s not necessarily all “good” for the planet. This kind of hotel move undermines Infection prevention,

what

are you like rubbing the shampoo bottle on your open sores???

Zeeb Aug 29, 19 2:14 pm


Originally Posted by Antarius (Post 31470846)
We get it, many of us dont think this is a problem worth worrying about.

How easy is it to do the same in a mini and drop it on the cart? Leave it in the room "untouched"? Extremely.

Anything is possible, but stop pretending there is no functional difference in both ease and opportunity in tampering with this

https://i.imgur.com/Pjl9Idr.jpg?1

vs this.

https://i.imgur.com/3qbz9NV.jpg

GUWonder Aug 29, 19 2:20 pm


Originally Posted by WillBarrett_68 (Post 31471069)
what

are you like rubbing the shampoo bottle on your open sores???

No, but the suggestion about rubbing open sores or the body in general after touching the wall-mounted dispensers just goes toward the point that the wall-mounted toiletries will be a pathogen-spreading vector and likely lead to some increased use of antibiotics and all the bad that the overuse of antibiotics means for the planet. ;)

WillBarrett_68 Aug 29, 19 2:22 pm


Originally Posted by GUWonder (Post 31471114)
[left]

No, but your suggestion about rubbing your open sores just goes toward the point that the wall-mounted toiletries will be a pathogen-spreading vector

nope

you're literally imagining this. nobody is going to catch ebola from shampoo dispensers

stimpy Aug 29, 19 2:41 pm


Originally Posted by stimpy (Post 31465713)
So Marriott is copying IHG? Here is the IHG thread from July. https://www.flyertalk.com/forum/inte...ll-brands.html

Only 115 posts. I am sure that this forum can beat that when it comes to toilet talk!

131 posts in a very short time. I knew we could do it!

GUWonder Aug 29, 19 2:43 pm


Originally Posted by WillBarrett_68 (Post 31471121)
nope

you're literally imagining this. nobody is going to catch ebola from shampoo dispensers

I am not the one imagining and introducing the narrative of catching Ebola from shampoo dispensers. That all has come from your post.

Ebola is a virus, so what does Ebola have to do with my comment about compromised infection prevention resulting in increased antibiotic use? Note to those who may not know this: antibiotic medication are not anti-viral medications. Try a different disease. ;)

cova Aug 29, 19 2:58 pm

The current small bottles have a seal on them. Things like the mouth wash has a piece of clear tape sealing the top. If I come across a container in the bathroom that was already open I don't use it. Again - that is why they are sealed. What keeps someone from putting something in the bottle.

Some European hotels I have stayed some time ago had dispensers but they were something you squeezed rather than pump - and in some cases they were in a sealed bag that got pierced when put in the holder rack. So not reused or refilled. Just a larger pouch than the small bottles.

Zeeb Aug 29, 19 3:54 pm


Originally Posted by cova (Post 31471261)
The current small bottles have a seal on them. Things like the mouth wash has a piece of clear tape sealing the top. If I come across a container in the bathroom that was already open I don't use it. Again - that is why they are sealed. What keeps someone from putting something in the bottle.

Some European hotels I have stayed some time ago had dispensers but they were something you squeezed rather than pump - and in some cases they were in a sealed bag that got pierced when put in the holder rack. So not reused or refilled. Just a larger pouch than the small bottles.

I'd consider that to be a way better compromise for getting rid of single use toiletries than having a refillable pump bottle of shampoo or body wash in the room.

CPH-Flyer Aug 29, 19 4:08 pm


Originally Posted by GUWonder (Post 31470773)


Given the following

https://www.sciencedaily.com/release...0617142534.htm

it’s not a big leap to expect that some people get sick from pathogens picked up from hotel remote controls.


Kirsch warns that this study is preliminary and is limited by the sample size, which included only 3 rooms in each state and 19 surfaces within each hotel room, but hopes that it is just the beginning of a body of research that could offer a scientific basis to hotel housekeeping.
The study is more about the cleaning process there is no realm indication that the level of contamination is at risk leves just because something has the highest level of contaminants does it mean that it poses a risk? If I go in to an industrial clean room, I am surely the highest carrier of contaminants (and I do poses a risk to the quale of the production) but does that make me a health risk to other people?

So it is a leap, while maybe not big, that I'd like to see some medical literature document.

Antarius Aug 29, 19 4:22 pm


Originally Posted by Zeeb (Post 31471096)
Anything is possible, but stop pretending there is no functional difference in both ease and opportunity in tampering with this

https://i.imgur.com/Pjl9Idr.jpg?1

vs this.

https://i.imgur.com/3qbz9NV.jpg

I'm nor pretending - I'm stating. Airport lounge showers and public restrooms have had dispensers for years.

unless you can cite an example, I do not believe there is a known epidemic or infectious disease problem that has been linked to soap dispensers.

KRSW Aug 29, 19 4:26 pm


Originally Posted by Collierkr (Post 31470990)
sad that so many fail to see the good this type of approach will have for our planet. Sure it saves money because there is less waste.

As currently implemented by Marriott, I'm not sure there really is an environmental benefit. Here's what is currently being used in the limited-service properties: https://www.mariettahospitality.com/...A+Tea+Tree.php

As you may note, they're only 8 oz, non-refillable bottles, complete with a permanently-attached pump dispenser. The current single-use bottles are either 2oz or 1oz depending upon the property. So, 1 dispenser pump bottle = 4-8 regular bottles. Prima-facia it seems like a good deal, BUT what's the real environmental cost? These are single-use bottles and can't be recycled -- there's multiple types of plastic AND most likely a metal spring inside of there, so they're heading straight for the landfill. Seriously, I'll see if I can snag an empty bottle from the hotel this weekend and do a proper teardown with photos for everyone & weigh out the components.

As a side note:
1) Cradle-to-grave, a Mercedes S-Class, including all of the gasoline it will consume in its lifetime, is more environmentally-friendly and puts out less CO2 than a Prius.
2) Cows are quite windy. (We can't have a 100+ post thread on FT without some mention of breaking wind, right?) The result is ~2300kg of CO2 per year. A car puts out ~108g/km. Do the math and you'll find that a single cow's farts in a year are equivalent to driving 21,296km (13,232 miles).
3) I guess if you want to be environmentally-friendly, drive a Mercedes S-Class instead of a Prius and eat more cows to keep them destroying the Earth. .

Antarius Aug 29, 19 4:27 pm


Originally Posted by cova (Post 31471261)
The current small bottles have a seal on them. Things like the mouth wash has a piece of clear tape sealing the top. If I come across a container in the bathroom that was already open I don't use it. Again - that is why they are sealed. What keeps someone from putting something in the bottle.

Some European hotels I have stayed some time ago had dispensers but they were something you squeezed rather than pump - and in some cases they were in a sealed bag that got pierced when put in the holder rack. So not reused or refilled. Just a larger pouch than the small bottles.

Mouthwash does. Most soaps do not. In the last couple months , I've stayed at the following hotels that do not have seals on their soaps, shampoos or lotions.

1. 4 luxury collection hotels (milton brown and others)
2. W
3. CY
4. FF
5. RI
6. JW marriott
7. SHS
8. Autograph collection hotel
9. RC
10. Westin

In addition, the Grand Hyatt, Hyatt Regencys, Hyatt Place and Hyatt houses do not have sealed minis either.

The only one that I can remember is the LM with the little seals on the Malin + Goetze cosmetics.

no one is advocating an open jar of mouthwash. They are sealed. But most soap and shampoos do not have tamper proof seals, and this hasnt caused an issue.

CPH-Flyer Aug 29, 19 4:39 pm


Originally Posted by cova (Post 31471261)
The current small bottles have a seal on them. Things like the mouth wash has a piece of clear tape sealing the top. If I come across a container in the bathroom that was already open I don't use it. Again - that is why they are sealed. What keeps someone from putting something in the bottle.

Some European hotels I have stayed some time ago had dispensers but they were something you squeezed rather than pump - and in some cases they were in a sealed bag that got pierced when put in the holder rack. So not reused or refilled. Just a larger pouch than the small bottles.

The mouthwash is always sealed, but shampoo in my experience very rarely come with a visible seal. Maybe some of the click liids have something that should make you able to notice if it has been opened before, but I don't seem to notice it then.

Handcake Aug 29, 19 4:57 pm


Originally Posted by DutchessPDX (Post 31466539)
I stayed at the Marriott Amsterdam Vondel Park a year or so ago, they had L'Occitane products in the room. Believe me I took every soap I could, they retail for like $8 each and they're fantastic.

I've only found one hotel that has that brand and only for the Club Level or Suite rooms. The soap they were providing wasn't as good quality as what I buy myself from that store. It is the soap I have used for years, so I can feel the difference. If you were getting the $8 ones, must mean they were putting out the full size travel ones, which I would snag SO fast too. The hotel I stayed at that had a kit (Sheraton Seoul Place) had soaps half the size of the official travel ones you can buy at airports or the actual stores. I think it was a lower priced item made for gifts or the hotel? I don't know but I wish I could find a hotel with the full size travel bars! I'd stay there every time!

I bring my own bars of soap with me when I travel. I am not so picky on shampoo, but my skin doesn't like a lot of the soaps hotels put out there and I don't do body wash.

GUWonder Aug 29, 19 4:58 pm


s0ssos Aug 29, 19 10:51 pm


Originally Posted by GUWonder (Post 31470773)


Given the following

https://www.sciencedaily.com/release...0617142534.htm

it’s not a big leap to expect that some people get sick from pathogens picked up from hotel remote controls.

I suppose you can also get sick from being outside. There are germs everywhere! Maybe also from touching other people. Do you ever touch things other people touch?

I would say the "big leap" you are taking is that everybody will get some irreversible contagious disease. Really? You know we deal with bacteria all the time, right? In fact, you have quite a few on your skin. I'm pretty sure you continuously wash your skin though, to prevent yourself from getting ill.

s0ssos Aug 29, 19 10:58 pm

As another poster mentioned, you haven't made the leap to this actual causing illness. "Disease vector" is just a term for bacteria, viruses, etc. Almost all humans have immune systems. People usually don't die from ingesting some dirt (otherwise that would be classified as a weapon of mass destruction and bioterrorism. Though maybe in your book it already is. Someone running around throwing dirt at people!!!)

As to why it is a "leap": your logic is that transferred germs can make ill people, and thus transferred germs cause ill people. A can lead to B, and thus A causes B. Except we don't know whether B actually happens.
If you substitute A for carbon products, B for life, most people agree that carbon products can lead to life. But does just having carbon products cause life? Obviously not.

Cathay Dragon 666 Aug 29, 19 11:08 pm

Great, now I can look forward to:

1) Dispensers not filled up, needed to call management, wait 30 minutes to 2 hours for someone to come and do the refill, and after-hours, tough luck, sleep dirty.

2) Dispensers filled with the wrong type of cleansers. Usually the culprit is Body Lotion being misplaced as Hair Conditioners, but also lazy staff simply filling shampoo as body wash or vice-versa.

3) Mixed dispensers that have contents filled years ago. Granted this is a long-term problem, but these cleaners do undergo chemical changes as time elapses, and not for the better. It can cause skin irritation, rashes, or worse.

4) Broken dispensers that makes it hard to get anything out. Call for service? Wait wait and wait, and again, after-hours? Sleep dirty.

From the hotel side, this will not save them money but cost them more. Studies has shown with little bottles, most people don't ask for extras but conserves what they use. But with dispensers, they are likely to pump each use multiple times and multiple uses during a single shower, which means the inventory for shampoo, conditioner, and body wash shoots up through the roof rather than bringing savings.

s0ssos Aug 29, 19 11:10 pm


Originally Posted by Cathay Dragon 666 (Post 31472302)
From the hotel side, this will not save them money but cost them more. Studies has shown with little bottles, most people don't ask for extras but conserves what they use. But with dispensers, they are likely to pump each use multiple times and multiple uses during a single shower, which means the inventory for shampoo, conditioner, and body wash shoots up through the roof rather than bringing savings.

That definitely not true for FT. Anybody remember that one where the person complained the staff commented when he asked for an extra big bottle of lotion (or something) for his one-night stay in a luxury hotel? About how he is cheap or something in Cantonese (I think it was in HK)

s0ssos Aug 29, 19 11:12 pm


Originally Posted by KRSW (Post 31471472)
As currently implemented by Marriott, I'm not sure there really is an environmental benefit. Here's what is currently being used in the limited-service properties: https://www.mariettahospitality.com/...A+Tea+Tree.php

As you may note, they're only 8 oz, non-refillable bottles, complete with a permanently-attached pump dispenser. The current single-use bottles are either 2oz or 1oz depending upon the property. So, 1 dispenser pump bottle = 4-8 regular bottles. Prima-facia it seems like a good deal, BUT what's the real environmental cost? These are single-use bottles and can't be recycled -- there's multiple types of plastic AND most likely a metal spring inside of there, so they're heading straight for the landfill. Seriously, I'll see if I can snag an empty bottle from the hotel this weekend and do a proper teardown with photos for everyone & weigh out the components.

As a side note:
1) Cradle-to-grave, a Mercedes S-Class, including all of the gasoline it will consume in its lifetime, is more environmentally-friendly and puts out less CO2 than a Prius.
2) Cows are quite windy. (We can't have a 100+ post thread on FT without some mention of breaking wind, right?) The result is ~2300kg of CO2 per year. A car puts out ~108g/km. Do the math and you'll find that a single cow's farts in a year are equivalent to driving 21,296km (13,232 miles).
3) I guess if you want to be environmentally-friendly, drive a Mercedes S-Class instead of a Prius and eat more cows to keep them destroying the Earth. .

Is the compostable "plastic" way too expensive for normal use? You know, those plastic cups which say they are from plant-based materials and biodegradable?

chipmaster Aug 29, 19 11:34 pm

What a small but admirable effort! Clever to time it with the world wide focus on the terribles of plastic polluting the world and leverage that to cut a little cost and put a little simpler dispenser in.

1) I rather do like the small bottles and what is left of the lotion, I'll admit I take with me to use at my company gym. The soap/shampoo no need, my company has bulk dispenser there and I use it.

2) OMG the germ a phobes, LOL. Don't you know what doesn't kill you makes you strong :D All them post about germs, mold OMG, you are roall ad warriors and use publc restrooms, share air with some random people who have traveled the world in airplanes ( know how dirty that seat, pocket, tray are? ) elevators, maybe even shared the bed with them too, and you worry about the bulk soap and lotion containers.

GUWonder Aug 29, 19 11:44 pm

Pathogen exposure which doesn’t kill you doesn’t necessarily make you strong/stronger, as the proverbial devil is in the biological details and the outcome for any given individual.


Originally Posted by s0ssos (Post 31472279)
I would say the "big leap" you are taking is that everybody will get some irreversible contagious disease.

I used the word “some” when talking about people. Not “everybody”. “Everybody” is the big leap that I never have made and would never make, but since there isn’t any real dialogue to be had over real information when dealing with disingenuous representations of the words of people with different ideas or opinions than one’s own when it comes to this Marriott move to wall-mounted toiletry dispensers, it’s clear to me that defending Marriott’s move to more wall-mounted dispensers is rooted in ideology and money more than in scientific understanding of pathogen spread and what exacerbates such problems (rather than what minimizes them) and what other problems are associated with this move even as it may have some benefit in reducing plastic waste.

The refillable dispensers are going to lead to hard(er) plastic waste too. Or is Marriott going to mandate the use of entirely non-plastic toiletry dispensers? I’m betting that Marriott and its hotels’ money-as-driver interest is going to mean that they will tend to be mostly hard plastic rather than being a repudiation of plastic in bathrooms.

GUWonder Aug 30, 19 12:01 am


Originally Posted by s0ssos (Post 31472311)
Is the compostable "plastic" way too expensive for normal use? You know, those plastic cups which say they are from plant-based materials and biodegradable?

Tetra-Pak is an expert in this area. And in its home market, plant-based, more readily degradable containers/bags/cups are commonly encountered at grocery stores and the leading type of packaging for grocery goods, liquid ones too.

Going after the tourism markets for petrochemical-based plastic waste problems misses the boat given the big fish to go after for petrochemical-based plastic waste is to be had by going after your neighborhood grocery, department and convenience stores.

And bioplastics aren’t necessarily a panacea:

https://www.google.com/amp/s/relay.n...-ocean-plastic

wysiwyg Aug 30, 19 3:37 am

Hotels are quick to switch for the so called environmental reasons. I wonder how quickly airlines will be willing to switch from plastic cutlery in coach and provide us with metal utensils which can be seen to some as being more environmentally friendly (if you ignore cleaning/soap impact). I’m sure they won’t be as quick due to added cost and weight.

EuropeanPete Aug 30, 19 3:50 am


Originally Posted by wysiwyg (Post 31472720)
Hotels are quick to switch for the so called environmental reasons. I wonder how quickly airlines will be willing to switch from plastic cutlery in coach and provide us with metal utensils which can be seen to some as being more environmentally friendly (if you ignore cleaning/soap impact). I’m sure they won’t be as quick due to added cost and weight.

You answered your own question there. Switching to metal cutlery and burning extra fuel isn’t an environmentally friendly move.

GUWonder Aug 30, 19 5:25 am

Plastic cutlery and other disposable such meal-related plastic service-ware used by airlines is petrochemical product in the main and fills up garbage trucks and landfills/incinerators. Maybe it’s best for the environment to ban people from having more than one child and ban travel entirely unless it’s just on your own feet and involves no wheels nor wings, eh? ;) Marriott will love that. Not!

Collierkr Aug 30, 19 7:27 am


Originally Posted by GUWonder (Post 31471024)


It’s not necessarily all “good” for the planet. This kind of hotel move undermines Infection prevention, and undermined infection prevention leads to increased consumption of antibiotics and all the bad that can mean.

aside from the fact I completely disagree, there is little to no evidence to support this. The doorknob, toilet handle, and tv remote are what you should be worried about AND if germs are that big of an issue then you should bring your own stuff.

Collierkr Aug 30, 19 7:32 am


Originally Posted by KRSW (Post 31471472)
As currently implemented by Marriott, I'm not sure there really is an environmental benefit. Here's what is currently being used in the limited-service properties: https://www.mariettahospitality.com/...A+Tea+Tree.php

As you may note, they're only 8 oz, non-refillable bottles, complete with a permanently-attached pump dispenser. The current single-use bottles are either 2oz or 1oz depending upon the property. So, 1 dispenser pump bottle = 4-8 regular bottles. Prima-facia it seems like a good deal, BUT what's the real environmental cost? These are single-use bottles and can't be recycled -- there's multiple types of plastic AND most likely a metal spring inside of there, so they're heading straight for the landfill. Seriously, I'll see if I can snag an empty bottle from the hotel this weekend and do a proper teardown with photos for everyone & weigh out the components.

As a side note:
1) Cradle-to-grave, a Mercedes S-Class, including all of the gasoline it will consume in its lifetime, is more environmentally-friendly and puts out less CO2 than a Prius.
2) Cows are quite windy. (We can't have a 100+ post thread on FT without some mention of breaking wind, right?) The result is ~2300kg of CO2 per year. A car puts out ~108g/km. Do the math and you'll find that a single cow's farts in a year are equivalent to driving 21,296km (13,232 miles).
3) I guess if you want to be environmentally-friendly, drive a Mercedes S-Class instead of a Prius and eat more cows to keep them destroying the Earth. .

was wondering where you were going with the cow comment as I thought maybe you were going to suggest their eradication.

pinniped Aug 30, 19 8:03 am


Originally Posted by Collierkr (Post 31473224)


was wondering where you were going with the cow comment as I thought maybe you were going to suggest their eradication.

[Insert that "had us in the first half, not gonna lie" meme here.]

Zeeb Aug 30, 19 8:54 am


Originally Posted by Antarius (Post 31471465)
I'm nor pretending - I'm stating. Airport lounge showers and public restrooms have had dispensers for years.

unless you can cite an example, I do not believe there is a known epidemic or infectious disease problem that has been linked to soap dispensers.

1) Public Restrooms and Airport lounge showers don't provide someone multiday private access in an entirely uncontrolled environment.
2) Nobody is talking about an epidemic. As I posted earlier in the thread, I think that 99.9% of the time there will be no issue at all. The whole objection is that when I go to a name brand hotel I don't want to have to wonder if I'm running in to that 0.1% situation.

JBord Aug 30, 19 9:40 am


Originally Posted by Collierkr (Post 31470990)


sad that so many fail to see the good this type of approach will have for our planet. Sure it saves money because there is less waste.

It saves money because it costs Marriott less to purchase bulk refills than small bottles. I doubt it has any significant effect on any single property's garbage bill. They probably still use the same number of dumpsters with the same number of pickups. I mean, really, all the bottles in all the rooms of a CY every day maybe fills one garbage bag?

In my post that you quoted, I stated that it's good for the environment - yet you accuse me and others of failing to see that? The point is, that if another new technology is invented for toiletries that saves Marriott even more money, they'll switch to that one, whether it's better or worse for the environment. The fact that they can claim this as environmentally friendly is a happy coincidence, and I don't fault them for taking the opportunity to get the good press. But large companies do this stuff to save money.

As one example of many I have in working with big corporations, I recall an executive telling me about an initiative to get rid of styrofoam coffee cups in the break room, and asking employees to bring in their own mugs and wash them. She explained to me how much cheaper it was to supply dish soap in each break room than the ~$1M (IIRC) they spent on styrofoam cups each year, and how they could advertise it as "green" to employees. This example is not uncommon.



Originally Posted by Cathay Dragon 666 (Post 31472302)
Great, now I can look forward to:

1) Dispensers not filled up, needed to call management, wait 30 minutes to 2 hours for someone to come and do the refill, and after-hours, tough luck, sleep dirty.

4) Broken dispensers that makes it hard to get anything out. Call for service? Wait wait and wait, and again, after-hours? Sleep dirty.

These are two problems I expect as well, although I think it will probably be only 1-2 times per year. I often get into my hotel the night before a meeting and get up and go the next day. No way I'll think to check the soap dispenser in each room. So a 30 min delay in the morning likely means I'm not showering, because I won't be late to my client's meeting. That bar of soap never lets me down, and I feel cleaner than with the liquid soap. :)

chipmaster Aug 30, 19 10:17 am

A new superbug is being developed and soon it will jump out of your bulk soap/shampoo/conditioner, then after another a few generations of mutation a strain will emerge and it will grow teeth or enzymes to burrow thru your skin and the end will have arrived.

Sorry maybe that is why I find water good enough unless I'm covered is something really nasty and need a little something to break it loose.

WillBarrett_68 Aug 30, 19 10:17 am


Originally Posted by Zeeb (Post 31473490)
2) Nobody is talking about an epidemic. As I posted earlier in the thread, I think that 99.9% of the time there will be no issue at all. The whole objection is that when I go to a name brand hotel I don't want to have to wonder if I'm running in to that 0.1% situation.

Right, this is all psychological. You're worried about shampoo when the entire room (not to mention trillions of other things you come in contact with every day) is already a "potential infection vector" or whatever.

chipmaster Aug 30, 19 10:19 am


Originally Posted by JBord (Post 31473658)
It saves money because it costs Marriott less to purchase bulk refills than small bottles. I doubt it has any significant effect on any single property's garbage bill. They probably still use the same number of dumpsters with the same number of pickups. I mean, really, all the bottles in all the rooms of a CY every day maybe fills one garbage bag?

In my post that you quoted, I stated that it's good for the environment - yet you accuse me and others of failing to see that? The point is, that if another new technology is invented for toiletries that saves Marriott even more money, they'll switch to that one, whether it's better or worse for the environment. The fact that they can claim this as environmentally friendly is a happy coincidence, and I don't fault them for taking the opportunity to get the good press. But large companies do this stuff to save money.

As one example of many I have in working with big corporations, I recall an executive telling me about an initiative to get rid of styrofoam coffee cups in the break room, and asking employees to bring in their own mugs and wash them. She explained to me how much cheaper it was to supply dish soap in each break room than the ~$1M (IIRC) they spent on styrofoam cups each year, and how they could advertise it as "green" to employees. This example is not uncommon.




These are two problems I expect as well, although I think it will probably be only 1-2 times per year. I often get into my hotel the night before a meeting and get up and go the next day. No way I'll think to check the soap dispenser in each room. So a 30 min delay in the morning likely means I'm not showering, because I won't be late to my client's meeting. That bar of soap never lets me down, and I feel cleaner than with the liquid soap. :)

Shower with lots of water not clean enough? What you been sleeping in, or eating and sweating????


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