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-   -   Marriott to Eliminate Single-use Toiletry Bottles (https://www.flyertalk.com/forum/marriott-marriott-bonvoy/1984883-marriott-eliminate-single-use-toiletry-bottles.html)

zymm Aug 28, 19 2:40 pm


Originally Posted by C17PSGR (Post 31467067)
I suspect there may not be any cost savings. The larger dispensers may save on the bottles but likely increase labor costs.

When IHG switched they stated that there is a significant upfront cost involved in installing the larger dispensers, but that investment will be recouped in 1-3 years from the cost savings associated with the bulk toiletries. No mention of increased labor costs. Any additional labor would come from housekeeping, and I doubt Marriott is going to up their time quota for cleaning or increase their salary, so no additional costs there. Maybe start tipping or increase your tip for housekeeping?

Antarius Aug 28, 19 2:42 pm


Originally Posted by kaizen7 (Post 31467259)
The luxury hotels that use dispenser in my experience was using ceramic bottle with metal pump.
It wasn't sealed and can be opened easily.

I wonder if staff empty the bottle and clean them thoroughly after guest check out?
And since the bottle was quite large, how much shampoo/shower gel/conditioner/lotion will be thrown out when they clean these bottles

Empty it out after every guest - is this a real question?

If i check out without touching the mini bottles, they don't throw them out. How can anyone guarantee no one did anything? Heck, most minis arent sealed - what's to stop someone in housekeeping from tampering with them either? What about the iron?

As long as the toothpaste and mouthwash (if present) are sealed, I'm not too worried about soap.

Antarius Aug 28, 19 2:43 pm


Originally Posted by C17PSGR (Post 31467067)
I suspect there may not be any cost savings. The larger dispensers may save on the bottles but likely increase labor costs.

How? They run out and they just replace the bottle. Showers in airport lounges have been doing this for years.

bhrubin Aug 28, 19 2:50 pm

While some of you debate the reasons why hotels are reducing/eliminating plastic toiletry containers and the security for the replacement refillable bottles, the policy will be implemented regardless. Enjoy.

The environmental benefits of reduced plastics are obvious and well proven despite the rhetoric to the contrary. Whatever the costs. It's a win for the environment, regardless. Enjoy.

Lots of trolling here. I'm out...since willful disinformation and ignorance aren't my cup of tea. Enjoy.

Dgosche Aug 28, 19 2:51 pm


Originally Posted by Antarius (Post 31467319)

If i check out without touching the mini bottles, they don't throw them out. How can anyone guarantee no one did anything? Heck, most minis arent sealed - what's to stop someone in housekeeping from tampering with them either? What about the

Is this true? I always assumed they tossed the minis because you couldn't tell if they had been used. At least that is what I always hoped was happening.

writerguyfl Aug 28, 19 3:21 pm


Originally Posted by Dgosche (Post 31466425)
I think these dispensers are disgusting. I had too many friends that were in frats to trust any mass use product that people have unsupervised access to. I'll either start buying my own disposable bottles or just use the bar soap on my hair.

Do you carry your own soap with you whenever you use a public restroom? The prospect of tampering in a public restroom is far greater than a hotel room where the management has a record of the name, address, and credit card of the previous occupant.

Besides, it's not as if the single-use bottles are under lock and key. If anyone wanted to tamper with them, it would be as simple as slipping the bad one onto an unattended housekeeping cart. And the safety seal is nothing more than a sticker.

GUWonder Aug 28, 19 3:36 pm

When hotels have transitioned away from single-use/take-away toiletries and toward re-fill-able dispensers, here is the kind of thing I increasingly encountered: finding out that there is no hand-soap or shower gel in the bathrooms when those items are most urgently needed; body lotion in the soap or shampoo or conditioner dispensers; empty dispensers that can’t be filled up until a hotel employee/contractor on site is free to come to the room to deliver them or I can get them from the lobby. And for early morning departures or late night arrivals at hotels, these kind of mess-ups is a far bigger issue than it may otherwise be. And for stays at hotels involving young kids, the big toiletry bottles’ wall mounts (and/or the walls where they are mounted) seem way more likely to end up broken by hotel guests according to some hotel housekeepers. I’m sure Marriott and the other hotels going this way don’t care, as the move is about hotels saving money by using environmental concerns as the excuse — same with house-keeping cut-backs for multi-night staying guests and same with the “eco-friendly” bathroom fixtures that throttle the water flow in the showers and sometimes even sinks. Combine all this “eco-friendly”-cover for hotel cost-cutting initiatives, and the hotel guest experience is worse for some of us than it would otherwise be without these hotel cost-cutting drives.

I can check-in at some hotels under the name “Writ Er Guyfl” without the hotel asking me for ID and/or credit card and without the hotel having done any address validation. My last three hotel stays — none were Marriott hotels, but all had wall-mounted toiletries — had me checking in by just verbally giving the front desk staff the last name as per on the reservation; and I never showed any ID not presented any credit card even as at least two of these hotels were “cash-free” hotels. But I’m also not likely to be someone to adulterate a bathroom toiletry dispenser in hotel rooms or anywhere else for that matter.

I do know of some FTers who more than joked about milking out airline lounge toiletries’s “fixed” dispensers from the BA lounges. I suspect something like that will happen increasingly at hotels too, as I suspect it’s happened a bunch at some European hotels that use Rituals in the bathrooms.

Dgosche Aug 28, 19 3:52 pm


Originally Posted by writerguyfl (Post 31467484)
Do you carry your own soap with you whenever you use a public restroom? The prospect of tampering in a public restroom is far greater than a hotel room where the management has a record of the name, address, and credit card of the previous occupant.

Besides, it's not as if the single-use bottles are under lock and key. If anyone wanted to tamper with them, it would be as simple as slipping the bad one onto an unattended housekeeping cart. And the safety seal is nothing more than a sticker.

Actually yes, but for a different reason. I can't help but think that the soap dispenser is the last thing someone touched before washing their hands after they've done whatever it is that they did in the bathroom. I'm much less afraid of tampering there because of the time along factor. Usually people are in and out of airport bathrooms enough that the risk of getting caught is high.

JBord Aug 28, 19 4:05 pm


Originally Posted by bhrubin (Post 31466953)
Yet the end result is still very good for the environment. So what's the problem? If the cost savings are the only reason for this change, it still is very good for the environment.

People are so worried about the reasons that they are missing the forest through the trees: ignoring the actual and tangibly very positive environmental impact.

Yes, I don't dispute that some good comes of it. But anyone thinking it's more than coincidental is fooling themselves. As soon as an even cheaper way to provide soap comes along, Marriott will find a reason to switch to that, and may go backwards in terms of environmentally friendly results. This time it worked out so they could put a good spin on it.

I don't like the dispensers, personally. So good for the environment, bad for me I guess. And likely very very good for Marriott's income statement.

ryw Aug 28, 19 4:29 pm

As long as they can keep them filled correctly and cleanly. I was at a Holiday Inn once that had pumps for shower gel, shampoo, and conditioner, but the shampoo container was filled with shower gel...was not my favorite experience.

I'll admit that I'm someone who has amassed a bit of a personal stash (really useful for guests, trips where I'm not staying at a hotel, and so on). So part of me is sad to see them gone for those reasons. But I think the environmental outcomes are good (and good for Marriott's finances as well). Theoretically, I suppose there's isn't anything to stop someone from buying refillable 3 oz. containers and filling them up from the pumps though...

CPH-Flyer Aug 28, 19 4:30 pm

Maybe, as some people say, 4 small bottles equate the same amount of plastic as one big.

But if I have a series of 1 night stays (which happens) then after each night all 4 small bottles are discarded, despite me not using but a small portion of the content of them. The big bottles would barely show signs of my consumption. So after 5 single nights the miniature bottles would have equated enough plastic to 5 big bottles, yet the big bottles in those rooms are still fine for many guests to come. Leave aside the fact that on long term stays, housekeeping will often replace the small bottles before they are empty.

The environmental benefit is obvious. If Marriott benefits as well, so be it. I can live with an initiative having more than one benefit. I can even live with Marriott doing this purely for the money, and the environmental impact just being a positive side effect.

MSPeconomist Aug 28, 19 4:34 pm


Originally Posted by cmd320 (Post 31466566)
Completely disagree. Marriott couldn't care less about the environment, this is 100% a cost-cutting measure wrapped up in some environmental marketing hype to get people on board with it. A swath of 4 small bottles or 1 big bottle is still going to produce the same amount of plastic. If they were really concerned about the environment they would remove the plastic all together and use glass bottles.

I consider glass in lower end hotels to be scary. I don't want to step on glass shards in the shower.

MSPeconomist Aug 28, 19 4:38 pm


Originally Posted by zymm (Post 31467315)
When IHG switched they stated that there is a significant upfront cost involved in installing the larger dispensers, but that investment will be recouped in 1-3 years from the cost savings associated with the bulk toiletries. No mention of increased labor costs. Any additional labor would come from housekeeping, and I doubt Marriott is going to up their time quota for cleaning or increase their salary, so no additional costs there. Maybe start tipping or increase your tip for housekeeping?

Why should I tip more and increase my costs while Marriott/Bonvoy saves money? This is a matter between hotel management and housekeeping staff, not something where I should be responsible for covering any difference.

Ysitincoach Aug 28, 19 6:38 pm

This poses the question of the slippery slope of what’s next?

Major US hotel chains have eliminated frequency of shuttles, doorstep newspapers, delivered checkout folios all in the name of the environment and as we know cost cutting.

Now go single use plastic toiletries...what’s next? Linen service? Towels reduced? Bed sheets? No air conditioning at all?

More and more the Marriott and the overall American hotel experience is reduced to a glorified eco-tourist camping trip.

mahasamatman Aug 28, 19 6:54 pm

Good move, though it should have been done years ago.


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