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-   -   Marriott to Eliminate Single-use Toiletry Bottles (https://www.flyertalk.com/forum/marriott-marriott-bonvoy/1984883-marriott-eliminate-single-use-toiletry-bottles.html)

Badenoch Sep 8, 19 9:00 am


Originally Posted by RoxyMountain (Post 31503420)
Let us know how that works out for you. :rolleyes:

As I have said, for years I saw those little bottles as wasteful and inefficient. My view had nothing to do with "virtue-signaling" (whatever that is), Celebrities, Royalty, Marriott marketing department, or private jets. Just the simple fact that there are more efficient, less wasteful, ways to deliver shampoo.

We agree. There are more efficient, less wasteful ways of delivering shampoo. But if that were all it was about then Marriott would have done it without fanfare or patting themselves on the back. Instead they issued a glowing press release about how wonderful they are and trotted out their CEO to be adored in fawning media interviews.

And they'll save a few bucks in the process. It's a social and financial win for them.

RoxyMountain Sep 8, 19 9:08 am


Originally Posted by Badenoch (Post 31503453)
We agree. There are more efficient, less wasteful ways of delivering shampoo. But if that were all it was about then Marriott would have done it without fanfare or patting themselves on the back. Instead they issued a glowing press release about how wonderful they are and trotted out their CEO to be adored in fawning media interviews.

And they'll save a few bucks in the process. It's a social and financial win for them.

A press release and some interviews. Seems like a small effort to explain a change to a decades old policy. It also did not have much pickup, I did not hear anything about it until I stumbled on this thread over a week after it happened. If this was a key part of some vast plot involving the royal family, private jets, and brain washing it seems to be a bit of a failure.

cmd320 Sep 8, 19 9:18 am


Originally Posted by RoxyMountain (Post 31502143)
Marriott estimates that, when the transition is complete, it will prevent around 500 million small bottles, or 1.7 million pounds of plastic, from entering landfills every year. ^ That is hardly a drop in the bucket.

IHG and Hilton have started similar initiatives. This trend is not going away.

And how many large bottles will be replacing the small ones in landfills each year?

RoxyMountain Sep 8, 19 9:34 am


Originally Posted by cmd320 (Post 31503515)
And how many large bottles will be replacing the small ones in landfills each year?

Not landfills, the larger bottles are easier to recycle as they can be rinsed out.
https://www.nbcnews.com/business/bus...-2020-n1047116


Naguib said most Marriott hotels will eliminate small bottles by July 1, 2020. Luxury brands will get rid of them by the end of 2020. Lower-priced brands will have dispensers or bottles that are tethered to the shower wall. Luxury brands will have untethered bottles. The bottles hold the equivalent of 10 to 12 small bottles, and all are tamper resistant.

The larger bottles will still be plastic, and Marriott still plans to replace them ó not just refill them ó when they run low. But Naguib said the larger bottles are easier to recycle than smaller ones.

​​​​​​​"Human nature is what it is and we resist change," he said. "But people understand that this is so much better."

cmd320 Sep 8, 19 10:56 am


Originally Posted by RoxyMountain (Post 31503567)
Not landfills, the larger bottles are easier to recycle as they can be rinsed out.
https://www.nbcnews.com/business/bus...-2020-n1047116

This assumes housekeeping staff are going to take the time to actually do this which I feel is going to be highly unlikely in the majority of cases. They're going to get tossed in the trash bag on the side of the housekeeping cart along with everything else and end up right in the same spot which would otherwise be occupied by a dozen small bottles.

Antarius Sep 8, 19 11:39 am


Originally Posted by Badenoch (Post 31503453)
We agree. There are more efficient, less wasteful ways of delivering shampoo. But if that were all it was about then Marriott would have done it without fanfare or patting themselves on the back. Instead they issued a glowing press release about how wonderful they are and trotted out their CEO to be adored in fawning media interviews.

And they'll save a few bucks in the process. It's a social and financial win for them.

So what? Why cant they get some credit for making a good decision? This is a win-win.

RoxyMountain Sep 8, 19 12:03 pm


Originally Posted by cmd320 (Post 31503802)
This assumes housekeeping staff are going to take the time to actually do this which I feel is going to be highly unlikely in the majority of cases. They're going to get tossed in the trash bag on the side of the housekeeping cart along with everything else and end up right in the same spot which would otherwise be occupied by a dozen small bottles.

Your post is an assumption. The more likely outcome is the policy outlined by Marriott will be followed, the bottles will be recycled, and there will be a reduction in waste.

cmd320 Sep 8, 19 12:18 pm


Originally Posted by RoxyMountain (Post 31503990)
Your post is an assumption. The more likely outcome is the policy outlined by Marriott will be followed, the bottles will be recycled, and there will be a reduction in waste.

It's no more an assumption than assuming already overworked and underpaid staff are actually going to take the time to do this. What is outlined in Marriott policy and what actually happens at each individual hotel property are often very different things.

RoxyMountain Sep 8, 19 12:30 pm


Originally Posted by cmd320 (Post 31504031)
It's no more an assumption than assuming already overworked and underpaid staff are actually going to take the time to do this. What is outlined in Marriott policy and what actually happens at each individual hotel property are often very different things.

They are placing an empty bottle in the right receptacle, not curing cancer.

If you find anything to support your theory of significant amounts going to landfill let us know. Should be simple, a weekend of dumpster diving at your local Springhill Suits should do it.

cmd320 Sep 8, 19 12:36 pm


Originally Posted by RoxyMountain (Post 31504066)
They are placing an empty bottle in the right receptacle, not curing cancer.

If you find anything to support your theory of significant amounts going to landfill let us know. Should be simple, a weekend of dumpster diving at your local Springhill Suits should do it.

I honestly don't care one way or another. All I'm saying is that if they can't get the front desk staff to manage simple things like room upgrades or 4pm check out, I kind of doubt the housekeeping staff is going to take the time to sort through the refuse and clean it out before recycling.

Badenoch Sep 8, 19 1:18 pm


Originally Posted by Antarius (Post 31503925)
So what? Why cant they get some credit for making a good decision? This is a win-win.

Nothing wrong with it at all. It's altruism with a payoff. If it didn't help the bottom line however they'd probably still be putting little bottles in their rooms. If making the change cost them more it wouldn't happen regardless of the demands from the eco-glitterati.

GUWonder Sep 8, 19 1:55 pm


Originally Posted by cmd320 (Post 31504031)
It's no more an assumption than assuming already overworked and underpaid staff are actually going to take the time to do this. What is outlined in Marriott policy and what actually happens at each individual hotel property are often very different things.

From having had lots of experience having hired staff/contractors to clean my residences, I can say that most paid cleaning staff seem way less comprehensive and accurate in recycling/sorting than when I would do it myself. And Iíve definitely noted a correlation between the recycling ending up in the general/burn waste and the socio-economic/demographic background of cleaning staff/contractors.

RoxyMountain Sep 8, 19 2:36 pm


Originally Posted by GUWonder (Post 31504282)
From having had lots of experience having hired staff/contractors to clean my residences, I can say that most paid cleaning staff seem way less comprehensive and accurate in recycling/sorting than when I would do it myself. And Iíve definitely noted a correlation between the recycling ending up in the general/burn waste and the socio-economic/demographic background of cleaning staff/contractors.

It appears you are complaining that the poor people you hired to clean your homes are bad at putting stuff in the right can. I have had great success with the poor people I hire to clean my houses. Perhaps it is an upper management issue rather than a poor people issue?

TravelinSperry Oct 6, 19 10:01 am

Guess I've got to buy bar soap and carry it with me from now on. Not sure how bar soap is worse than large plastic bottles. Seems to me they can use small bar soap that is wrapped in recycled paper. And then it'd be the best solution for all (tamper evident) and no plastic large or small.

cmcc Oct 6, 19 6:31 pm

For anyone who is worried about landfills, etc., you can get yourselves up to speed with this:

https://www.nytimes.com/1996/06/30/m...s-garbage.html


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