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Marriott to Eliminate Single-use Toiletry Bottles

Marriott to Eliminate Single-use Toiletry Bottles

Old Sep 2, 19, 9:53 am
  #211  
 
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Originally Posted by christianj View Post
I’m not generally opposed to the wall mounted dispenser BUT housekeeping needs to be taught to put the right liquid in the dispensers! I was just at the Moxy FRA and both of the dispensers in the shower contained conditioner and there was no shampoo/shower gel. Washing your hair and cleaning your body just doesn’t work with just conditioner! Totally annoying!
Sometimes housekeeping stocks the room with correct amount of those single use bottles ... all of them are conditioners as well
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Old Sep 2, 19, 10:00 am
  #212  
 
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Certainly the driver behind this it cost savings that just happens to align with environmental PR. Same was true when they tried to get guests to reuse towels.

Soap dispensers on the wall give it a feel like a public restroom which is not great for high end properties. If I’m staying at an aloft that is already the case, and understandable but I can’t see top properties doing that. I noticed the St Regis bottles are bigger even now so maybe they will stay. The bottles also help to market and sell the better products - I remember taking the leftover bliss from a W hotel and then we liked it enough to order it online.

if they do this for the lower end properties like courtyard, Fairfield, etc. then that would be the majority of the cost and environment savings. If people are paying north of $500 for a room, they probably don’t want a common use dispenser or bottle.
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Old Sep 2, 19, 10:08 am
  #213  
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Originally Posted by bhrubin View Post
I love you.

Hysteria and FlyerTalk go hand in hand for far too many. It tends to come from those who also are terrified of travel to Mexico, are upset the lounge isn't open 24/7, believe they are entitled to the Presidential Suite upgrade as a Gold elite, think the hotel owes them compensation after the power goes out because of a storm, are furious that they can't get Coca-Cola products, etc.
If I drunk Coke I would probably be a bit unhappy about the Pepsi thing tbh, but I otherwise wholly endorse this post.
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Old Sep 2, 19, 10:28 am
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I remain skeptical that there will be any cost savings as the increase in labor cost will offset any savings from the bottles.

As a practical matter, a lot of environmental initiatives make our lives more difficult

1. For those who are concerned about climate change, one way of reducing energy usage is to limit flexibility in setting temperature in rooms. Many LEED buildings don't permit people to change temperatures.
2. Try to get a fast flow of water in California or Arizona
3. Many places are banning water bottles

SPG was the industry leader in all these areas with a focus on using less energy and getting rid of plastic. As for the plastic, its good to see Marriott adopting SPG policies.
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Old Sep 2, 19, 3:25 pm
  #215  
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Originally Posted by kaizen7 View Post
Sometimes housekeeping stocks the room with correct amount of those single use bottles ... all of them are conditioners as well
But they tend to be labeled properly more so than the wall-mounted dispensers with multiple toiletry types.
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Old Sep 2, 19, 3:32 pm
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I am in favour of this to reduce the plastic footprint, but staff do need to monitor those bottles. I am finding them empty way too often, even at high end Residence Inns, even if they have see through on the side. I even tried to develop a messaging signal (does one exist, like with towels?) to signal the bottle is empty but removing the dispenser thing and leaving it on the side. Nothing. Bottle still empty. I always travel with a tiny spare one in my bag so not a big deal, but it should not happen.
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Old Sep 2, 19, 3:42 pm
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Originally Posted by C17PSGR View Post
I remain skeptical that there will be any cost savings as the increase in labor cost will offset any savings from the bottles.

As a practical matter, a lot of environmental initiatives make our lives more difficult

1. For those who are concerned about climate change, one way of reducing energy usage is to limit flexibility in setting temperature in rooms. Many LEED buildings don't permit people to change temperatures.
2. Try to get a fast flow of water in California or Arizona
3. Many places are banning water bottles

SPG was the industry leader in all these areas with a focus on using less energy and getting rid of plastic. As for the plastic, its good to see Marriott adopting SPG policies.
How will this take more labor? I cannot see this adding any material time to housekeeping.
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Old Sep 2, 19, 4:03 pm
  #218  
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Originally Posted by Antarius View Post
How will this take more labor? I cannot see this adding any material time to housekeeping.
It will take less labor on average, and that will be part and parcel of an increased likelihood of hotel guests encountering empty or broken wall-mounted toiletry dispensers.

Neither Marriott nor Starwood have been industry leaders in being “environmentally-friendly” when it comes to cutting plastics or anything else — except in them being larger mess makers and thus having more to cut and more money to save. The real “leaders” in this kind of hotel cost-cutting under cover of “save the world”? Hotels in Scandinavia. Last night for me, this meant having a Scandinavian hotel room stuck at 27.5C-29C while the outside temp was far more pleasant and under 72F. But having windows that open is apparently bad for the environment, violated area building code/permit, and/or was ruled out by hotel developers for some other reasons. And adjusting the AC was capped at max +/- 2.5C. The nearby AirBNB listings are looking more favorable.
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Old Sep 2, 19, 4:53 pm
  #219  
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Originally Posted by GUWonder View Post


It will take less labor on average, and that will be part and parcel of an increased likelihood of hotel guests encountering empty or broken wall-mounted toiletry dispensers.

Neither Marriott nor Starwood have been industry leaders in being “environmentally-friendly” when it comes to cutting plastics or anything else — except in them being larger mess makers and thus having more to cut and more money to save. The real “leaders” in this kind of hotel cost-cutting under cover of “save the world”? Hotels in Scandinavia. Last night for me, this meant having a Scandinavian hotel room stuck at 27.5C-29C while the outside temp was far more pleasant and under 72F. But having windows that open is apparently bad for the environment, violated area building code/permit, and/or was ruled out by hotel developers for some other reasons. And adjusting the AC was capped at max +/- 2.5C. The nearby AirBNB listings are looking more favorable.
Proper aircon is still not a standard thing in hotels in Scandinavia, nor anywhere else for that matter. I don't necessarily think that is/was driven by environmental concerns. More driven by a "we don't need it more than a few days a year, so we will just suffer through those" thinking. The AirBNB will have windows that open, but very likely no aircon whatsoever.
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Old Sep 2, 19, 5:32 pm
  #220  
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Originally Posted by CPH-Flyer View Post
Proper aircon is still not a standard thing in hotels in Scandinavia, nor anywhere else for that matter. I don't necessarily think that is/was driven by environmental concerns. More driven by a "we don't need it more than a few days a year, so we will just suffer through those" thinking. The AirBNB will have windows that open, but very likely no aircon whatsoever.
AC is not a standard thing for hotels anywhere? That is news to me.

I am very familiar with Scandinavia, with residential properties in Scandinavia, and with Scandinavian hotels and with most such hotels and homes in the region not having any AC; but most such hotels and homes have room windows that open, while the hotels that don’t have any open-able room windows do have AC of sorts. I have stayed at over 100 major brand hotels in the Scandinavia region and have had thousands of nights in the area, so I know what to expect — including with regard to the short-comings of hotel housekeeping when hotels go from single-use toiletries to wall-mounted dispenser toiletries in the hotel rooms.

The nearby AirBNB listings are looking more favorable from a room temperature perspective and also from the perspective of having no wall-mounted toiletry dispensers.

Last edited by GUWonder; Sep 2, 19 at 5:40 pm
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Old Sep 2, 19, 6:15 pm
  #221  
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Originally Posted by GUWonder View Post


AC is not a standard thing for hotels anywhere? That is news to me.

I am very familiar with Scandinavia, with residential properties in Scandinavia, and with Scandinavian hotels and with most such hotels and homes in the region not having any AC; but most such hotels and homes have room windows that open, while the hotels that don’t have any open-able room windows do have AC of sorts. I have stayed at over 100 major brand hotels in the Scandinavia region and have had thousands of nights in the area, so I know what to expect — including with regard to the short-comings of hotel housekeeping when hotels go from single-use toiletries to wall-mounted dispenser toiletries in the hotel rooms.

The nearby AirBNB listings are looking more favorable from a room temperature perspective and also from the perspective of having no wall-mounted toiletry dispensers.
hehe slight lack of clarity in my typing. Meant to say "nor anywhere else in Scandinavia" But hey ho, sometimes the fingers are not following the thinking.

Most hotels do have aircon of sorts indeed, but not a proper one that let's you freely adjust temperatures. As I said, mostly on the argument that it is never hot enough in Scandinavia to matter. Well, surprise it is hot enough to matter, and getting so more frequently it could seem. Or Scandinavians are just getting more sensitive to heat.
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Old Sep 2, 19, 6:54 pm
  #222  
 
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Originally Posted by jrich7970 View Post
But you don't have to use these products. As a 100+ nights a year person as well...if I had an issue with these dispensers, I would just bring my own. And I might start. A little bottle of shampoo lasts me more than the 5 days I'm there. So, filling one up and tossing it in my bag before I leave isn't exactly a big deal.

Just my opinion. Others may differ.
I do have a problem with the dispensers and I do generally bring my own.

If more travelers begin to bring their own, Marriott saves even more than just eliminating the small bottles. Now they will be using less product overall
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Old Sep 2, 19, 10:56 pm
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Originally Posted by GUWonder View Post


It will take less labor on average, and that will be part and parcel of an increased likelihood of hotel guests encountering empty or broken wall-mounted toiletry dispensers.

Neither Marriott nor Starwood have been industry leaders in being “environmentally-friendly” when it comes to cutting plastics or anything else — except in them being larger mess makers and thus having more to cut and more money to save. The real “leaders” in this kind of hotel cost-cutting under cover of “save the world”? Hotels in Scandinavia. Last night for me, this meant having a Scandinavian hotel room stuck at 27.5C-29C while the outside temp was far more pleasant and under 72F. But having windows that open is apparently bad for the environment, violated area building code/permit, and/or was ruled out by hotel developers for some other reasons. And adjusting the AC was capped at max +/- 2.5C. The nearby AirBNB listings are looking more favorable.
How? Just like I am unclear on how this adds more labor, I also do not understand how this results in empty or broken dispensers. Broken, I can see occasionally, but empty - how is this any more difficult than any other task housekeeping does?

I do agree that Marriott has done a piss poor job on eliminating plastics and their "redesigned" room service is environmentally horrendous. But one wrong does not mean they need to do more. I'd hope that they fix the waste issue next.
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Old Sep 2, 19, 10:57 pm
  #224  
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Originally Posted by Antarius View Post
How? Just like I am unclear on how this adds more labor, I also do not understand how this results in empty or broken dispensers. Broken, I can see occasionally, but empty - how is this any more difficult than any other task housekeeping does?

I do agree that Marriott has done a piss poor job on eliminating plastics and their "redesigned" room service is environmentally horrendous. But one wrong does not mean they need to do more. I'd hope that they fix the waste issue next.
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How it happens (i.e. the cause) matters less to customers than that it happens — as the failure is not the customers’ as much as it’s the hotels’.

The hotels’ failure of all toiletry provisioning in the hotel rooms happens to hit more frequently and a lot harder after the switch to only wall-mounted toiletry dispensers than before such switch. If you deal a lot with process engineering labor-intensive activities, you would not be as surprised by the outcome and maybe you would blame the lack of QA checks. But the QA checks being more needed or needing to be more complex (than before) is generally an indicator that failure outcomes are not going to be less likely on average (nor less extreme on average) than before this Marriott move.

Originally Posted by freeflyin View Post
I do have a problem with the dispensers and I do generally bring my own.

If more travelers begin to bring their own, Marriott saves even more than just eliminating the small bottles. Now they will be using less product overall
That is a possibility. Along with that is the following possibility: that hotel guests use the hotel toiletry dispensers to create their own toiletries to take away in whole or in part. That this takes place is why there are sometimes signs placed next to such hotel room dispensers stating that guests are able to buy bottles of the toiletries from the front desk or online or something else like that.

If people really care to see a lot less toiletry and other plastic waste, then way more people should be hostile to the TSA (and its European counterparts) for the size-based restrictions on liquids/gels/aerosols as part of cabin baggage.

Last edited by GUWonder; Sep 3, 19 at 1:38 am
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Old Sep 3, 19, 6:25 am
  #225  
 
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Originally Posted by C17PSGR View Post
I remain skeptical that there will be any cost savings as the increase in labor cost will offset any savings from the bottles.
How do you figure? Replacing liquid in dispensers takes significantly longer time than placing new bottles? Or are you factoring in all the calls to housekeeping for broken, empty, or moldy/disgusting dispensers?

If, in either case, it resulted in more labor time, I'd argue that it's just opportunity cost and not a true expense for the hotels. I can't imagine anyone is going to hire additional staff or allow additional overtime just because of the dispensers. In fact, if that were the case, I'm pretty sure corporate would have heard it from owners. It's a telling sign that we aren't hearing owners fight the change -- validates the argument that they're saving money.
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