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Why do some Marriott hotels store guests' passport numbers?

Why do some Marriott hotels store guests' passport numbers?

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Old Jan 23, 19, 12:46 am
  #46  
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Originally Posted by UA-NYC View Post
Awesome leadership at the top as usual from this guy
He couldn't lead a Scout troop through a shopping mall. Completely useless - after his wailing, crying and falling on the floor in anguish after the nonsense with China, he lost any shred of credibility as far as I'm concerned. This new nonsense is just whipped cream on the sundae of failure.

Get rid of him, quick.
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Old Jan 23, 19, 5:02 am
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Originally Posted by MePlatPremier View Post
That is the reason why most hotels, in most countries, ask for IDs in the first placeóto report the identities of their guests to law enforcement agencies and/or immigration services.
No, itís not. A small (tiny) minority of governments in generally quite authoritarian states do. Generally hotels ask for ID because they want to know who is staying in their hotel.
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Old Jan 23, 19, 5:33 am
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Originally Posted by EuropeanPete View Post


No, itís not. A small (tiny) minority of governments in generally quite authoritarian states do. Generally hotels ask for ID because they want to know who is staying in their hotel.
Quite to the contraryóvery democratic, even European, states demand to know, on a daily basis, the identity of all hotel guests or, at least, of foreign hotel guests.Even in the U.S., before City of Los Angeles v Patel, it was not uncommon for local governments to require hotels to collect guestsí identity details and keep them available for inspection by law enforcement upon request. And Patel did not change that, just insisted on more procedural guarantees.
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Last edited by MePlatPremier; Jan 23, 19 at 5:42 am
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Old Jan 23, 19, 6:53 am
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I'm an American and it also scares me that Marriott takes this. However, if you check into a hotel in China you have no choice. Everywhere else I refuse to give my passport and just show my license.
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Old Jan 23, 19, 7:23 am
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Originally Posted by Temedar View Post
Because that's hardly the reason to store the data in a centralized database. Assume a hotel in China is required by law to record guests' passport information. Why should it be shared it with Marriott?
The systems that most hotels use, while having local databases for the specific hotel, run off a main database. Thus when you make a booking directly with hotel, the hotel is really making a booking in the centralized system. The local database just allows the hotel to still function if it gets disconnected from the main system.
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Old Jan 23, 19, 7:32 am
  #51  
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Originally Posted by escape4 View Post
So let's say I visit country XYZ, upon check-in I hand over my driver's license and when they insist I must show my passport, I answer that I left it at a friend's house several hundred miles away in that same country. Can they refuse me a room just because I do not have my passport? I understand hotels and immigration might prefer to have my passport as ID, but I have never heard that it is an absolute necessity otherwise I cannot stay in the hotel. But I have never tested this - maybe I should.
Originally Posted by margarita girl View Post
I'm pretty sure Chinese hotels won't/can't let you check in without a passport. I was on a group tour (my one and only time) years ago, and a family had a shoulder bag stolen with their passports and a load of cash (which they were taking to an orphanage where they had adopted their daughter from). The tour guides were trying to figure out how they were going to even be able to get them a hotel room until they got replacement passports.
It varies on the country. Some require it simply to rent a room. Some require it because they're required to register you with the police. Those that do it for the first, no way around generally. Those that do it for the latter, there's usually a time limit they have to register you. Thus they could at least check you in for the 1st night and than insist on it the following day. I believe Chinese hotels have 24-48 hours to register guests. (Note this can vary region to region in China) However since most do it electronically, at time of arrival, I would guess they may not have procedure to allow even one night stay without. Those that actually goto the local police station would be the more likely to wait till next day.
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Old Jan 23, 19, 7:56 am
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But I do think being briefed after one of the largest and most serious data breaches in history is a key CEO responsibility. Otherwise, what's he good for?
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Old Jan 23, 19, 10:43 am
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Originally Posted by flyerCO View Post
The systems that most hotels use, while having local databases for the specific hotel, run off a main database. Thus when you make a booking directly with hotel, the hotel is really making a booking in the centralized system. The local database just allows the hotel to still function if it gets disconnected from the main system.
You're correct, however, this doesn't fully answer my question. I understand that all information about the room reservation (name, price, hotel and/or FF #, etc.) goes into the main DB. The hotel may also have some notes on the guest (like "regular visitor" or "prefers a quiet room") that may or may not be shared with the global database. What I don't understand is the reason for sharing sensitive information that's not really useful for your other stays - the next Chinese hotel would make another copy of your passport instead of using the one in the main database.
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Old Jan 23, 19, 12:06 pm
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Originally Posted by C17PSGR View Post
Several countries are required to keep passport information for guests. It's been that way for years.

Not sure why this is even an interesting discussion.
Agreed. Some of the comments here are from people that clearly do not travel often enough to varied countries.

I can think of over a dozen countries I have been to where a passport scan and name 'correction' to match the passport has been an obsession, normally to confirm to national police reporting requirements. While China is a big one, there are many others in South America, the Middle East and Africa.
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Old Jan 23, 19, 3:10 pm
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Originally Posted by EuropeanPete View Post


That does seem inconceivable. If youíve stayed in hundreds of Italian hotels you must have been staying in hotels in Italy for what, 20 years straight?

Iíve lived in Italy for 4 years and since then worked in both Rome and Milan for about a year involving much less than hundreds but certainly tens of hotel stays, including a high proportion of the Marriott group hotels and have been asked for a passport every single time. If youíve really never been asked for ID you must surely either be the Pope or have something beyond bizarre going on.
No you misread my post. I said not once in 20 years have they NOT asked me for a passport or an ID.
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Old Jan 23, 19, 3:16 pm
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Originally Posted by MePlatPremier View Post
As a rule of thumb, a driver license is not a form of identification outside the country of issuance (and the ocasional neighbouring or otherwise friendly country). In fact, in some countries it is not valid identification document even in the country of issuance (drivers are required to carry both the license and a national ID card). In Europe you may not board a plane or cross a land border (even within the Schengen Area) with a driver license (except for Nordic Council and Common Travel Area nationals). In most Asian countries you wonít be able to buy even a SIM card with a driverís license.
PRECISELY my point. But hey, if some of you can get away with diver's licenses (not even a DRIVER'S license) then all the power to you.
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Old Jan 23, 19, 5:56 pm
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Originally Posted by SouthernTide View Post
I'm an American and it also scares me that Marriott takes this. However, if you check into a hotel in China you have no choice. Everywhere else I refuse to give my passport and just show my license.
I imagine if I pull an American courage in China and demanded they respect my privacy and accept my driver license without making any copies, I'll probably be treated similarly to the ex-Canadian diplomat and Canadian business man, arrested and being mental torture for a few months, have no help from the embassy before needing to write a confession letter apologize publicly on state-run TV. Might makes right.

Starwood hotels of Hong Kong, Taiwan, Japan, Thailand, and Singapore all require my passport (or local ID equivalent). Amurica is ok with my driver license but among all places Big Apple New York asked for my employment proof to qualify for the slightly lower nightly rate (meaning hotel must have gotten defrauded in the past and now less trusting)
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Old Jan 23, 19, 6:11 pm
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Originally Posted by bostontraveler View Post
PRECISELY my point. But hey, if some of you can get away with diver's licenses (not even a DRIVER'S license) then all the power to you.
+1. Any in some countries, you'll pay a large tax unless you can prove you are not a citizen by providing your passport.

Originally Posted by flyerCO View Post
The systems that most hotels use, while having local databases for the specific hotel, run off a main database. Thus when you make a booking directly with hotel, the hotel is really making a booking in the centralized system. The local database just allows the hotel to still function if it gets disconnected from the main system.
Originally Posted by Temedar View Post
Because that's hardly the reason to store the data in a centralized database. Assume a hotel in China is required by law to record guests' passport information. Why should it be shared it with Marriott?
So ... are you suggesting you would like to have 800 different Marriott hotels with their private database of passport and other information? Don't you think that would be a security nightmare?

Dealing with a state actor that is intent on harvesting data is a huge problem but .... local hotels lack the expertise to deal with criminals.

Again, I find this whole topic odd -- how about a title: "Why do certain countries require Marriott to store passport information?"

And the reality is that as a general rule, the countries who require Marriott to store passport information keep all that same information in their own database. Those databases have almost certainly been compromised but just don't get any press.
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Old Jan 23, 19, 6:23 pm
  #59  
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Originally Posted by SouthernTide View Post
I'm an American and it also scares me that Marriott takes this.
How so? What about it frightens you?
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Old Jan 23, 19, 6:48 pm
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Originally Posted by C17PSGR View Post
Any in some countries, you'll pay a large tax unless you can prove you are not a citizen by providing your passport.
It's impossible to prove you're not a citizen of a country. I know many people with two or three citizenships.
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