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The Idiots who Design Marriott Rooms

The Idiots who Design Marriott Rooms

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Old Aug 15, 18, 1:49 pm
  #421  
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Originally Posted by EuropeanPete View Post
If I understand the JW Marriott branding correctly, it generally aims at being a 4*/ 5* business-friendly property.
In the US, many JWs barely qualify as 4* IMO. I'd put SF, LA Live, and MSP in this grouping for sure (with SF actually being best of those three).
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Old Jan 4, 19, 10:37 am
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Ugh.

It looks like Marriott is once again experimenting with eliminating or downsizing the in-room desk. Here's what an executive said:

Guests no longer need large desks to put their machines on but require, instead, several more outlets in more locations so that they can have flexibility in how they work and use the room.

https://www.forbes.com/sites/lauraan.../#89b79e73d336
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Old Jan 4, 19, 6:38 pm
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I read there is another redesign underway that further eliminates tub/shower combos in favor of shower only. It is a cost effective way of stylishly upgrading the bathroom but not long term smart for hotels. Bath people and little kids need the tub. The tub/shower combos in Europe are the right way to do it because they use deep tubs. A good deep tub soak is a luxury even shower people appreciate for a treat during a hotel stay. The typical American hotel tub/shower tub is not deep enough. Do the bath makeover right and give us a better tub/shower combo instead of just a shower.
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Old Jan 4, 19, 6:46 pm
  #424  
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Originally Posted by Tizzette View Post
I read there is another redesign underway that further eliminates tub/shower combos in favor of shower only. It is a cost effective way of stylishly upgrading the bathroom but not long term smart for hotels. Bath people and little kids need the tub. The tub/shower combos in Europe are the right way to do it because they use deep tubs. A good deep tub soak is a luxury even shower people appreciate for a treat during a hotel stay. The typical American hotel tub/shower tub is not deep enough. Do the bath makeover right and give us a better tub/shower combo instead of just a shower.
With apologies, that is a change I can applaud. Certainly, a hotel that is family friendly will need a sufficient pool of rooms with tubs. But for higher category rooms or suites, perhaps, that the more elite and business-friendly customers are more likely to want, a tub can often be wasted space for many.

i never take a bath. My husband loves a bath but rarely takes one. The tubs in our many rooms/suites have been wasted on us, certainly.

I would assume certain brands that are more family friendly will have higher proportions of rooms and suites with tubs than those that are more business-friendly.
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Old Jan 4, 19, 6:59 pm
  #425  
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Bathtubs aren't just for families with small kids. There's nothing like a good deep bathtub to use during a leisure/romantic stay. In fact, even for business trips, it's nice to relax in a good bath after a tough travel day, a long/hard work day, or before an evening (business) event.

You seem to suggest that rooms with bathtubs should become separate (sub)categories, able to be confirmed at the time of reservation.

IMO the elimination of bathtubs is nothing but a costcutting and spacesaving measure.

BTW, I expect a good suite to have a good bathtub and a separate shower, although I realize that there are locational/cultural variations.
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Old Jan 4, 19, 7:24 pm
  #426  
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Originally Posted by MSPeconomist View Post
Bathtubs aren't just for families with small kids. There's nothing like a good deep bathtub to use during a leisure/romantic stay. In fact, even for business trips, it's nice to relax in a good bath after a tough travel day, a long/hard work day, or before an evening (business) event.

You seem to suggest that rooms with bathtubs should become separate (sub)categories, able to be confirmed at the time of reservation.

I only suggest that not everyone will miss tubs in some rooms. I leave it to the hotels to figure out how to best execute that for their own markets and needs.

IMO the elimination of bathtubs is nothing but a costcutting and spacesaving measure.
That may be, or it may not actually be as cost cutting as everyone imagines. Either way, if it suits some customers and also saves money, I call that a win win.

BTW, I expect a good suite to have a good bathtub and a separate shower, although I realize that there are locational/cultural variations.
I know this is true at luxury hotels. I donít think that is as true at other segments.

Almost any luxury customer will assume that any good luxury hotel room bathroom will have double vanities, a shower, and a tub. Whether that applies to suites at all hotel segments is another question. I personally donít believe a suite at a Sheraton must have a bath tub.
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Old Jan 5, 19, 7:38 am
  #427  
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Originally Posted by Tizzette View Post
I read there is another redesign underway that further eliminates tub/shower combos in favor of shower only. It is a cost effective way of stylishly upgrading the bathroom but not long term smart for hotels. Bath people and little kids need the tub. The tub/shower combos in Europe are the right way to do it because they use deep tubs. A good deep tub soak is a luxury even shower people appreciate for a treat during a hotel stay. The typical American hotel tub/shower tub is not deep enough. Do the bath makeover right and give us a better tub/shower combo instead of just a shower.
For new-build properties, I think much of it will still come down to the owner, who has to build the hotel to Marriott's minimum specs and standards. They can exceed minimums, but that's an added cost -- especially if you're using a cookie-cutter design. Anything extra will require additional design expenses.

As for renovated properties, I suspect the cost of removing the bathtubs is expensive and most owners will avoid, unless they're gutting the building.

It is kind of amazing that not even a century ago a good hotel boasted of en suite bathtubs and toilets. Now, a bathtub is an inconvenience. At this rate, the toilets will soon be an inconvenience and we'll see the return of chamber pots, albeit fancy, hipster-designed chamber pots for the millennials and whatever the generation that comes after them is called. I mean, who has the time to sit down on the toilet anymore in this always connected, 24/7/365 world we live in?
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Old Jan 5, 19, 7:41 am
  #428  
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Originally Posted by bhrubin View Post
i never take a bath. My husband loves a bath but rarely takes one. The tubs in our many rooms/suites have been wasted on us, certainly.
Originally Posted by MSPeconomist View Post
Bathtubs aren't just for families with small kids. There's nothing like a good deep bathtub to use during a leisure/romantic stay. In fact, even for business trips, it's nice to relax in a good bath after a tough travel day, a long/hard work day, or before an evening (business) event.
The problem is often the bathtubs aren't clean. I can't tell you how many times there is visible body or pubic hair in the tubs. I travel with flip-flops for the shower because of this exact reason. I also travel with the anti-bacterial wipes to clean the toilet seat.
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Old Jan 10, 19, 10:23 am
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I can totally understand why some people want a bathtub, but for hotels that are marketed towards business travelers I see a shower as a positive as a replacement for the small bathtubs that I've never, ever used except to shower in. If I'm on a romantic getaway or something then yeah, a big soaker bathtub is a positive. But when I'm traveling for work having a walk in shower is nice and way less slippery compared to the type of bathtub they are replacing.
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Old Jan 10, 19, 1:27 pm
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Originally Posted by Zeeb View Post
I can totally understand why some people want a bathtub, but for hotels that are marketed towards business travelers I see a shower as a positive as a replacement for the small bathtubs that I've never, ever used except to shower in. If I'm on a romantic getaway or something then yeah, a big soaker bathtub is a positive. But when I'm traveling for work having a walk in shower is nice and way less slippery compared to the type of bathtub they are replacing.
This. I like a deep soaker tub (we renovated our bathrooms at home to include one) but most hotels with tubs only have the cheap, shallow builder tubs that aren't comfortable to lay in and can't hold enough water to actually soak. So if you can't give me a good tub, at least give me a good shower. I applaud Marriott and their brands for upgrading many of the hotels with nice, large showers. I can relax after a long day or a hard workout with a long, steamy shower just as well as a bathtub soak (assuming we're not in a drought).

That said, if I'm in a resort or getaway location, I expect a deep soaking tub AND a shower.
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Old Jan 24, 19, 5:57 am
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The Renaissance that I stay at in Dallas has just rennovated their rooms. They used to have rooms with two queen beds with a bathtub/shower combo with two counters and sinks, one outside the bathroom.
It was great, espcially if you had several people in a room. They have taken out the bathtubs, one of the counters and sink and put in a large shower. I agree a large soaking bathtub and shower combination would be so much better.
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Old Feb 16, 19, 3:15 pm
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who designs these new properties?

I stayed at a Towneplace that is new, was in construction just a few months ago. The wall mounted AC unit is right next to your bed so you get to feel the air blowing over you. Now, if you were at a junky motel that might be expected, but really?

And now I'm staying at a Residence Inn, which is pretty new, and half the one-bedroom suites are next to the street. You can hear the cars (meaning they didn't bother to change the windows).

They are both beautiful properties from the outside, and from the inside initially. Until you start staying there.
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Old Feb 16, 19, 3:44 pm
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Originally Posted by s0ssos View Post
I stayed at a Towneplace that is new, was in construction just a few months ago. The wall mounted AC unit is right next to your bed so you get to feel the air blowing over you. Now, if you were at a junky motel that might be expected, but really?

And now I'm staying at a Residence Inn, which is pretty new, and half the one-bedroom suites are next to the street. You can hear the cars (meaning they didn't bother to change the windows).

They are both beautiful properties from the outside, and from the inside initially. Until you start staying there.
My question as well. My view is that folk that design these are not regular hotel users. From my point of view, I want functionality & pleasant experience. At many properties, the lighting is atrocious, desk is not functional, bathroom have no space to put toiletries. The list goes on and on from my view.

And to make matters worse, they use the same footprint from hotel to hotel. You would think somebody would at least give it a test run and improve on the next iteration.
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Old Feb 16, 19, 3:47 pm
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Originally Posted by cre95 View Post
My question as well. My view is that folk that design these are not regular hotel users. From my point of view, I want functionality & pleasant experience. At many properties, the lighting is atrocious, desk is not functional, bathroom have no space to put toiletries. The list goes on and on from my view.

And to make matters worse, they use the same footprint from hotel to hotel. You would think somebody would at least give it a test run and improve on the next iteration.
That's exactly how the manager responded when I complained about being next to the room. She noted the designers should stay here, and realize that one-bedrooms (the "upgraded room") should be away from the street, not next to it.
Here an "upgrade" is a mixed bag.
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Old Feb 16, 19, 3:56 pm
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Placement of Air / Heat unit in the SHS / Courtyard level properties is a major pet peeve of mine. Worst is when it is directly in front of the desk. Just what I want when trying to get some work done....

My hack is to drape a towel over the ironing board, and place it directly in front of the unit. Effective to block the air from blowing directly on me while still providing heat / cool air.
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