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Luxury -- is it space, style, decor?

Luxury -- is it space, style, decor?

Old Jul 13, 17, 12:51 pm
  #31  
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Originally Posted by KatW View Post
I hear you, bhrubin, on too much space. I prefer one-bedroom accommodations so frequently eschew larger suites/villas. Our upcoming stay at Las Ventanas in Cabo is booked into a one-bedroom villa with private pool.

Whenever possible, true luxury includes an outdoor space, be it patio, terrace, balcony, deck.
^^^

Major envy--I've always wanted to try out the Las Ventanas beachfront villa with private pool. I do hope you'll enjoy it immensely and then share with us the details and review of the experience!
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Old Jul 13, 17, 12:55 pm
  #32  
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Originally Posted by bhrubin View Post
^^^

Major envy--I've always wanted to try out the Las Ventanas beachfront villa with private pool. I do hope you'll enjoy it immensely and then share with us the details and review of the experience!
With little optimism (because I rarely win these sweepstakes), I booked oceanview and hope fervently for an oceanfront upgrade. Because ours is an August stay, my aspiration isn't altogether fatuous.
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Old Jul 13, 17, 1:08 pm
  #33  
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Originally Posted by KatW View Post
With little optimism (because I rarely win these sweepstakes), I booked oceanview and hope fervently for an oceanfront upgrade. Because ours is an August stay, my aspiration isn't altogether fatuous.
I had to look up fatuous. Thanks for adding to my vocabulary!

I concur with your assessment, too.
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Old Jul 13, 17, 7:20 pm
  #34  
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Flowers ! Yes, yes, yes.

And water changed. Le Bristol does this so exquisitely.
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Old Jul 14, 17, 12:07 am
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Luxury is mostly about service for me, as well as style. Style includes everything from excellent food and wine, comfortable and well appointed rooms and suites, which as a prerequisite must be adequately spacious. I have preferences when it comes to décor, but that is not my first consideration when choosing an hotel. I choose hotels and resorts based on location, service, and the overall quality of experience I expect to have. Décor often comes into play when I am choosing a specific room or suite within an hotel.

Service, F&B, and comfort are what I care about most. Excellent service and F&B can easily outweigh slightly dated rooms and suites, or other shortcomings. But the reverse is not true for me. A stylish, beautiful hard product and vast amounts of space still do not add up to luxury if the service and food are crap.
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Old Jul 14, 17, 1:07 am
  #36  
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Can't argue with you, mikefromtokyo. Service is important, to be sure.

It's most often an artificial exercise when we try to impose rank. Suffice it to say, The ideal for me is lots of space, high degree of comfort, superb service, appealing style and decor, and good ac. With great F&B, flowers in room, two toilets, stand-alone shower, an accessible-from-room outside area and a private pool.
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Old Jul 14, 17, 3:53 am
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This is a great thread. We're talking about the X factor, which is the essence of luxury for me.

My take on the topic is: space is important but it's also important that it is well conceived. As others have said, a suite can be too big, especially if it is poorly furnished or designed. I don't want to rattle around in my room! That said, a well-designed space does not have to be unusually large to be luxurious. But few smaller spaces in hotels are both really well-designed and luxurious IME. Often, to get the living space we want, we need to book a suite/villa/whatever with more bedrooms than we need.

Quality of fittings is essential. No nasty veneers or ill-fitting joinery. I don't need it to be like my home, but I don't want a lesser quality of finish.

Decor - should be of its place. I don't like cookie cutter and I don't like blindly trend-driven decor.

If there is a beautiful outlook, I want it. If there is a terrace or balcony, I will always choose that room option. I don't like to feel hemmed in.

I want natural light and privacy and I want it to be absolutely silent when I shut the door.

When I leave my room I want the hotel to have a residential feel if I am travelling for leisure and I want to feel like an individual, but that is straying into service....
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Old Jul 14, 17, 4:31 am
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Originally Posted by KatW View Post
Can't argue with you, mikefromtokyo. Service is important, to be sure.

It's most often an artificial exercise when we try to impose rank. Suffice it to say, The ideal for me is lots of space, high degree of comfort, superb service, appealing style and decor, and good ac. With great F&B, flowers in room, two toilets, stand-alone shower, an accessible-from-room outside area and a private pool.
And fortunately all of those things do actually coexist at more than a few places on earth, and that's where the magic is.

Aman Sveti Stefan, Amanpulo, Soneva Fushi, Gili Lankanfushi, Soneva Kiri and some that come to mind. But it's very subjective, what's perfect luxury for me may be less ideal for someone who needs very cold AC, or someone who does not like partially open air bathrooms etc...

Le Bristol is a perfect example of a city hotel that embodies "luxury"
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Old Jul 14, 17, 10:11 am
  #39  
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there are properties where there are no/few 1BR

good private pools often require unused bedrooms
great living rooms most likely in multi-BR houses/villas
also spacious (not cramped) guest bath in living area

unused BRs have no bearing on amazing living space
i think Baghoarder described it well >

Originally Posted by Baghoarder View Post
few smaller spaces in hotels are both really well-designed and luxurious IME. Often, to get the living space we want, we need to book a suite/villa/whatever with more bedrooms than we need.

I don't like to feel hemmed in.

I want natural light and privacy

residential feel
trips are often likely to be different, as noted
Originally Posted by SanDiego1K View Post
I like a hotel that positions its furniture and designs its windows and curtains so that I can enjoy the view.

I like comfortable furniture.
one of my enjoyable experiences with both of these things was in a single family home (in hotel inventory) at a resort. after my stay, they changed living room sofa to a more contemporary one that didnt look as comfortable, and angled sofa away from great mountain view. latest renovation also flipped outside furniture away from mountain view, and added several things that somewhat obstruct view.

Last edited by Kagehitokiri; Jul 14, 17 at 1:27 pm
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Old Jul 14, 17, 12:54 pm
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Originally Posted by Kagehitokiri View Post
there are properties where there are no/few 1BR

good private pools often require unused bedrooms
great living rooms most likely in multi-BR houses/villas
also spacious (not cramped) guest bath in living area
I don't mind having an unused bedroom or two. It's something that comes with most larger villas, which therefore as you note tend to have the best pools. And it can also be a perfect opportunity to invite friends or family to come along, if desired.
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Old Jul 14, 17, 2:03 pm
  #41  
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Originally Posted by MikeFromTokyo View Post

Le Bristol is a perfect example of a city hotel that embodies "luxury"
Definitely checks all the boxes ^
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Old Jul 15, 17, 9:39 am
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Great thread, Kat! Hmm, for me:

1. Well designed space. If it is a large space, I want to furniture placement to break up the space and maximize the views. If it is a smaller space (I don't mind) then there must be sufficient table space and footspace. Lots of light, easily accessible power jacks and maximization of a view. Outdoor space with seating (preferably a portion of it covered).

2. Design with a sense of history. If it's a new hotel, then I don't mind sparse, modern furniture. But in a 150 year old property, I want unpainted woodwork, period furnishings and old world elegance. (seeing plastic lamps in a old building makes my blood boil).

3. A comfortable couch with high sides. I am a corner sitter and I hate to not be able to snuggle into my nook. And ditto for a footstool. It's crazy how many hotels have uncomfortable couches (the vast majority).

4. Very comfortable bed (I like firm with a down and pillow cover) with both a choice of soft and more firm pillows, as well as high thread count linens.

5. Plenty of Thick towels and good toiletries that do NOT smell like a fruit basket. I love the toiletries at Chicago's Athletic Association hotel precisely because they are unique.

6. Bedside lighting that is variable (I have to have low lighting to read before bed)

7. Strong AC that is NOT motion activated (having motion activated AC in a bedroom is just beyond stupid to me).

8. Blackout curtains (particularly in the NE, when it's light at 4:45a in the summer).

9. Plush carpet or good wool rugs (I like to go barefoot whenever possible).

10. Lots of counter space in the bathroom, and a good sized tub. (I never take baths at home, and it's a form of relaxation for me). Movable shower heads and/or makeup mirrors (I hate when they install makeup mirrors 5'8" from the floor, not helpful at all to women of normal height...and a bit offensive)

11. A fridge. I hate the taste of coffee but can't live without the caffeine. I like a place to store my sparking water and mocha makings.

12. A good sound system.

13. A full sized pool (former swimmer) or near the beach.

14. Spa services that are on par, or exceed, what I can get in Boston (I hate going to a highly touted spa, only to be on the table thinking....my massage therapist in Boston is loads better than this person).

15. Both casual and formal dining options. I prefer the former, but like the latter once or twice on a trip. Room service with a wide menu variety.

It's funny, I never really thought about flowers adding a luxury touch...but then I remembered...If there is a small vase of flowers on a room service tray, I always transfer them to my bedside table...so I guess I do like flowers in my room!

Last edited by navi_jen; Jul 15, 17 at 9:55 am
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Old Jul 15, 17, 10:25 pm
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Well, here's a YouTube video: Youtube.com/watch?v=RKctlPtb64g. The G. Ramsay on a so-called 'luxury' hotel that doesn't look quite so luxurious to me. For once I'd agree with him. $800 for a hotel like that is ridiculous, especially when compared to suites available in the Asia-Pacific region, for example.

Similar to what others have said, for me a luxury hotel must have a combination of space, style, decor, service, amenities and facilities. Any decent hotel can have a comfortable bed, but the best hotels are designed in such a way that one could quite happily spend some time making use of the hotel when not sight-seeing and roaming the streets.

For one thing, big, deep pools for guests, not to mention big, deep baths and rain-showers in the bathroom are very much my cup of tea (coffee rather, since I don't drink tea).

Which reminds me: too many five-star hotels don't have decent shaving kits. One of the first things I do when entering a room for the first time is to explore every nook and corner, and find out what's on offer. I forgot to pack my shaving kit the other day when in Sydney, and so used the Radisson Blu-supplied shaving kit. Cheapest razor possible, and the shaving cream dried out my face. Understandably we all have different skin; perhaps others have a better experience with the same stuff.



Haven't yet used my old kit from the Grand Hotel Saigon, but it does at least feel a little more weighty in the hand, despite only having two blades (I'm a four or five bladed razor man when traveling and not using the electric thing).



In other words, luxury hotels and any other decent five-star joint should never skimp on their bathroom amenities!
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Old Jul 15, 17, 10:55 pm
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Originally Posted by Catweazle View Post
In other words, luxury hotels and any other decent five-star joint should never skimp on their bathroom amenities!
I have encountered my fair share of luxury hotels in Europe that constantly skimp on not just bathroom amenities. No coffee making facility or coffee machine in the room is a pet peeve of mine. Some don't even provide mineral water. Both comes standard in even 3star hotels in Asia.
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Old Jul 15, 17, 11:45 pm
  #45  
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Originally Posted by Catweazle View Post
Well, here's a YouTube video:

In other words, luxury hotels and any other decent five-star joint should never skimp on their bathroom amenities!
They shouldn't but this is one of the areas easiest to skimp on. MO HK will blow you away with their bathroom amenities.
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