Interessting article in Sueddeutsche Zeitung: Faule Tricks zum Billigtarif

Old Oct 16, 03, 1:22 pm
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Interessting article in Sueddeutsche Zeitung: Faule Tricks zum Billigtarif

Sorry, in german only

http://www.sueddeutsche.de/sz/reisen/red-artikel2091/
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Old Oct 16, 03, 1:54 pm
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I am not saying they should not do this at all, but I think their primary focus should be to improve their service and train their staff in order to prevent incidents of bad attitude instead of "hunting" people.

What is next, will they start "hunting" people who have a foreign address in their profile and thereby might have a lower threshold to reach SEN than if they used their also existing German address?

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Old Oct 16, 03, 3:03 pm
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LHs Carl Hanratty is Stefan Versemann. He tries to catch types like Frank Abignale Jr. if he can.
 
Old Oct 16, 03, 3:51 pm
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<font face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif" size="2">Originally posted by attorney28:
I am not saying they should not do this at all, but I think their primary focus should be to improve their service and train their staff in order to prevent incidents of bad attitude instead of "hunting" people.
</font>
You are right in saying that improving service and training your staff is important, but I my opinion those people who plain right steal have no right to be protected.

[This message has been edited by DLSTR (edited 10-16-2003).]
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Old Oct 17, 03, 3:18 am
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for the benefit of English speakers, a loose, abbreviated translation...


"Crookedness to Get Cheap Flights"

Counterfeit tickets and other tricks: what LH's task force is doing about crooked customers.

Reimbursement of 60 000 Euros for five years of using student tariffs is being required of a long-graduation 31-year-old. It's payments like these that really payoff for LH investigator Stefan Versemann. Together with four collegues, this investigator has, for the last four years, sought out ticket fraud. Says Versemann, the airline loses triple-digit millions each year, through fraudulent tickets, improper rebookings or credit card fraud.

In many of the cases, the criminals had the help of travel agencies, who either disregard rules or even falsified passport data in the computers.

And to the detriment of LH itself, who has to invest in preventive measures: in the coming year, every Lufthansa-Ticket will, at check in, be verified as to its authenticity. Currently, LH, along with airlines such as SAS and Cathay Pacific, uses 'stickers' for rebookings. During a test in 2000, for 48 hours, LH investigators at the Frankfurt Airport tracked 30,000 flight documents, coming to the conclusion that almost half of the stickers - 47 percent - were falsified. Many travels used the sticker system to claim themselves First-Class-Customers, although they only paid for Economy.

To further reduce losses from fraud, LH has to work closer with other airlines, says Versemann. In particular, credit card fraud in Africa present particular challenges: tickets are often book telephonically with stolen credit card numbers, then picked up without proper identification, resulting in improper charges toward a third party.

A newer problem for investigators is the Internet sales of unused flight coupons to others. Those sales, in themselves, are not illegal. But, the only person who can fly is the one with his name on the ticket. Since name checks at the gates is nearly 100% now, these purchasers go on to manipulate the ticket -- and make themselves a prime case for the Task Force.

HELGE SOBIK
(translated from the original in German)

[This message has been edited by Grog (edited 10-17-2003).]
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Old Oct 17, 03, 3:41 am
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What they are talking about are real frauds, no tricks. I totally agree that the have to haunt people falsify tickets.

<font face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif" size="2">What is next, will they start "hunting" people who have a foreign address in their profile and thereby might have a lower threshold to reach SEN than if they used their also existing German address?</font>
Thats what I understand as a trick. The big difference is that this is legal as long as you did not have given them a faked address.

[This message has been edited by Tazmania (edited 10-17-2003).]
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Old Oct 17, 03, 7:25 am
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But why should they care about a valuable super loyal customer.It does not really matter, if he flies 110k or 155k, right ?

IMO, a completely different story than the one about people stealing credit cards to book F flights with them...

Seriously doubt the one with the faked student ID, though.
Nobody is stupid enough to risk this amount, if he can sign in at any given UNI in D for about 100 Euros fees per semester, right ?
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Old Oct 17, 03, 8:11 am
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Threy, its not that easy with student fairs. Terms of most airlines only allow to book this fairs up to age of 29.
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Old Oct 17, 03, 11:54 am
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I'm saying they should do this cause it's not the airline that asks to be cheated...it's two per cent of the travellers that do this.

Bye
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