Cpap for redeye on A321 Neo.

Old Jan 1, 20, 9:36 am
  #1  
Original Poster
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Posts: 78
Cpap for redeye on A321 Neo.

Hi all - Traveling back on the Redeye for Gye to Jfk. I've never flown overnight so I have concerns with my sleep apnea. It:s a 9:55 flight arriving at 5:12am. I'm in an EMS seat in row 17. Am I able to use my home cpap machine on the plane? Does anyone know if these seats have a power outlet? I'm looking for any other advice on how to deal with this including just toughening it out and trying to stay awake the whole flight.

Thanks..
Harmoncove is offline  
Old Jan 2, 20, 9:49 am
  #2  
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: NYC
Programs: DL KM, B6 Faux-saic, Bonvoy Gold, RHG Gold, Hilton Silver, Natl Exec, Avis PC, Greyhound Road Rwds
Posts: 6,987
The CPAP must have its own power source such as a battery. You cannot use the in-seat power outlet for your device. What if the outlet doesn't work? Here is a quote from their website:

Portable electronic personal ventilators, respirators, and continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) and BiPAP machines may be carried and used on board JetBlue, in accordance with specific FAA guidelines.

Please note some of our aircraft have in-seat electrical power, but it is not available for ventilators, respirators, BiPAP or CPAP machines.

Ventilators, respirators and CPAP machines are considered assistive devices. They must be stowed and used in the cabin consistent with applicable TSA, FAA and other regulations governing carry-on bags.


If you are using a POC, you cannot sit in a bulkhead or exit row, and you must be in a window seat. I imagine the requirement for a CPAP device is similar. You may want to call JetBlue for more specific information.

-J.
Often1 and RWPrincess like this.
GW McLintock is offline  
Old Jan 2, 20, 11:16 am
  #3  
A FlyerTalk Posting Legend
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: DCA
Programs: UA US CO AA DL FL
Posts: 48,124
The B6 rule is consistent with the policy on most carriers worldwide. Seat power is both unreliable and often insufficient. Thus, you will need battery pack(s) sufficient to cover the length of the flight.

If you figure that you will get about 4 hours of downtime on this flight, will your battery power the CPAP for that long? If not, you may need a second battery with you.
Often1 is offline  
Old Jan 2, 20, 1:20 pm
  #4  
 
Join Date: Nov 2018
Posts: 110
i think a portable cpap may be more reasonable, although I think they are usually out of pocket.

on a separate note, i hate these red-eyes from gye-jfk...

twice ive done gye-mia-jfk, and the gye-mia was a similar red eye...i dont understand these flights
michael1023 is offline  
Old Jan 5, 20, 3:29 pm
  #5  
 
Join Date: May 2017
Location: NYC
Programs: TrueBlue, Hyatt
Posts: 51
Originally Posted by michael1023 View Post
i think a portable cpap may be more reasonable, although I think they are usually out of pocket.

on a separate note, i hate these red-eyes from gye-jfk...

twice ive done gye-mia-jfk, and the gye-mia was a similar red eye...i dont understand these flights
Agreed, it really took the wind out of my sails when B6 finally added JFK-SJO direct flights and the SJO-JFK was a red-eye
Intheair2night is offline  
Old Jan 10, 20, 12:12 pm
  #6  
 
Join Date: Nov 2002
Location: New York, NY
Posts: 66
I'm a little late to the party, but I just used my portable CPAP on a early am flight from JFK to LAX, so I could get a few extra hours of sleep. Since it was only going to be for a couple of hours and I was in Mint, I tried the AC outlet first and it was fine, but if you can't do without the machine, I wouldn't chance it. I've found the AC outlets on all aircraft to be hit or miss, wherever you're seated. Half the time the ac cable won't even stay plugged in to the outlet securely. Although I have the Philips Dreamstation Go, there's much cheaper machine that works very well, the Human Design Z2. As someone else mentioned though, the travel CPAP machines are out of pocket expenses as far as insurance companies are concerned.
flyinggolfer is offline  
Old Jan 10, 20, 12:17 pm
  #7  
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: NYC
Programs: DL KM, B6 Faux-saic, Bonvoy Gold, RHG Gold, Hilton Silver, Natl Exec, Avis PC, Greyhound Road Rwds
Posts: 6,987
Originally Posted by flyinggolfer View Post
I'm a little late to the party, but I just used my portable CPAP on a early am flight from JFK to LAX, so I could get a few extra hours of sleep. Since it was only going to be for a couple of hours and I was in Mint, I tried the AC outlet first and it was fine, but if you can't do without the machine, I wouldn't chance it. I've found the AC outlets on all aircraft to be hit or miss, wherever you're seated. Half the time the ac cable won't even stay plugged in to the outlet securely. Although I have the Philips Dreamstation Go, there's much cheaper machine that works very well, the Human Design Z2. As someone else mentioned though, the travel CPAP machines are out of pocket expenses as far as insurance companies are concerned.
The outlets aren't designed to support such devices. By using the outlet, you risk it shorting out, or in the worst case producing sparks which could start a fire.

-J.
GW McLintock is offline  
Old Jan 10, 20, 3:01 pm
  #8  
 
Join Date: Nov 2002
Location: New York, NY
Posts: 66
Originally Posted by GW McLintock View Post
The outlets aren't designed to support such devices. By using the outlet, you risk it shorting out, or in the worst case producing sparks which could start a fire.

-J.
Thanks. Out of curiosity, do you know or have a rating on the outlets? I'd like to know because if the Dreamstation Go (pulls between 2.5 and 5.5 amps) is a risk, I should also avoid plugging in my mobile phone charger which draws 7 amps.
flyinggolfer is offline  
Old Jan 10, 20, 3:35 pm
  #9  
A FlyerTalk Posting Legend
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: DCA
Programs: UA US CO AA DL FL
Posts: 48,124
The simple fact is that B6 has made a determination that its onboard power is not suitable. In the wrong setting, this can turn ugly with the crew. The passenger convenience plugs are not on any aircraft's MEL and that puts the Captain in an awkward situation.

"While some of our aircraft have in-seat electrical power, it’s not suitable for medical devices."

The solution really is simple. Battery power.
GW McLintock likes this.
Often1 is offline  
Old Jan 12, 20, 9:33 am
  #10  
 
Join Date: Apr 2004
Location: BOS
Programs: Marriott Titanium / LTG, HHonors Gold, JetBlue Mosaic, Nat'l Exec
Posts: 3,401
Originally Posted by GW McLintock View Post
The outlets aren't designed to support such devices. By using the outlet, you risk it shorting out, or in the worst case producing sparks which could start a fire.
Frankly that’s nonsense. First, most current CPAP power supplies are literally indistinguishable from those used on laptops, with identical wattage and construction.

Second, the outlets are all designed to shut off at any hint of excess power draw.

I wouldn’t count on the outlets to be sufficient, or reliable, but the only danger in trying it out is disagreement with the crew.
dtremit is offline  

Thread Tools
Search this Thread
Search Engine: