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Coronavirus impact in Japan [consolidated]

Coronavirus impact in Japan [consolidated]

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This thread is for discussion of the coronavirus / COVID-19 pandemic as it relates to Japan. Non-Japan-related discussion should be taken either to the most relevant forum, the Coronavirus and Travel forum, or the OMNI forums.
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Old Jun 29, 20, 7:09 pm
  #2146  
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Originally Posted by JJarmuth07 View Post
I thought about going too, however I'm worried about 2 things:
(1) I don't have a "Permanent Resident" "Spouse" or "Long Term Resident" visa. Although I've lived in Japan since 2013, I have a work (Specialist - Humanities) visa and not a LTR visa...
(2) I'm not sure what documentation is necessary from the hospital. I'm sure I can get some documents from the physician (there was only one) but I'm not sure what documents they will accept from the hospital. There are bills but I don't think I'm not sure if I can take those.. maybe a copy?
Well, do you have a job / place to live / like are you basically "resident" in Japan? Do you pay taxes etc? Do you have a juminhyo? If you do, then I think that's a pretty reasonable equivalent of someone whose daily life is in Japan. Or do you come and go? Specialist - Humanities is language teacher I think, right? I'm assuming you either are attached to a school, or probably had to leave the school because of your trip back (or were in between jobs, but that's details) so you could just say that.

As far as proof, I would bring a physician's letter, and any certificates / notes you would have. For example, maybe the hospital could write something in support? (Not sure if this is permitted by privacy etc). I'm quite certain on the Japan side the specific documents aren't defined either, which creates a lot of grief on one side, but allows plenty of leeway on the other, and if your story is true (hey, don't take it the wrong way, this IS the internet after all, for all we know we're all dogs to begin with), and you have sufficient circumstantial evidence to support it (selfies with patient? remember they're date and location-stamped on most phones), then I would expect to be able to make a case on arrival.
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Old Jun 29, 20, 7:17 pm
  #2147  
 
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Originally Posted by Pseudo Nim View Post
Well, do you have a job / place to live / like are you basically "resident" in Japan? Do you pay taxes etc? Do you have a juminhyo? If you do, then I think that's a pretty reasonable equivalent of someone whose daily life is in Japan. Or do you come and go? Specialist - Humanities is language teacher I think, right? I'm assuming you either are attached to a school, or probably had to leave the school because of your trip back (or were in between jobs, but that's details) so you could just say that.

As far as proof, I would bring a physician's letter, and any certificates / notes you would have. For example, maybe the hospital could write something in support? (Not sure if this is permitted by privacy etc). I'm quite certain on the Japan side the specific documents aren't defined either, which creates a lot of grief on one side, but allows plenty of leeway on the other, and if your story is true (hey, don't take it the wrong way, this IS the internet after all, for all we know we're all dogs to begin with), and you have sufficient circumstantial evidence to support it (selfies with patient? remember they're date and location-stamped on most phones), then I would expect to be able to make a case on arrival.
Yes I've worked as a headhunter in Tokyo for 5+ years. I have my meishi with me as well, but no juminhyo or ryoshusho (tax documents) on me. They should be able to see my visa and admittances going back to 2013, so should be ok there.

Well noted about the proof. However, the thought that I'd have "selfies with patient" is disgusting and offends me deeply . I hope to never have to experience that again, nor you or anyone else.
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Old Jun 29, 20, 7:22 pm
  #2148  
 
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Originally Posted by Pseudo Nim View Post
Well, do you have a job / place to live / like are you basically "resident" in Japan? Do you pay taxes etc? Do you have a juminhyo? If you do, then I think that's a pretty reasonable equivalent of someone whose daily life is in Japan. Or do you come and go? Specialist - Humanities is language teacher I think, right? I'm assuming you either are attached to a school, or probably had to leave the school because of your trip back (or were in between jobs, but that's details) so you could just say that.

As far as proof, I would bring a physician's letter, and any certificates / notes you would have. For example, maybe the hospital could write something in support? (Not sure if this is permitted by privacy etc). I'm quite certain on the Japan side the specific documents aren't defined either, which creates a lot of grief on one side, but allows plenty of leeway on the other, and if your story is true (hey, don't take it the wrong way, this IS the internet after all, for all we know we're all dogs to begin with), and you have sufficient circumstantial evidence to support it (selfies with patient? remember they're date and location-stamped on most phones), then I would expect to be able to make a case on arrival.
" think that's a pretty reasonable equivalent of someone whose daily life is in Japan." ---> that's just your opinion and in no way how the Immigration officers will view it, or the reality of the situation in fact.... LTR visa is a very specific for people with Japanese, Sino-Japanese, or other familial connections with Japan... so again, irrelevant...

It's up to the Immigration officers at the airport on the day I land. Barring that red "special" Kanji stamp (which I don't have), I'll have to produce a ton of documents explaining my situation and even then it's not 100% certain. What is certain is that I don't have the correct visa they mention on the document everyone's been referencing. That's plain and simple.
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Old Jun 29, 20, 7:24 pm
  #2149  
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Originally Posted by JJarmuth07 View Post
Yes I've worked as a headhunter in Tokyo for 5+ years. I have my meishi with me as well, but no juminhyo or ryoshusho (tax documents) on me. They should be able to see my visa and admittances going back to 2013, so should be ok there.

Well noted about the proof. However, the thought that I'd have "selfies with patient" is disgusting and offends me deeply . I hope to never have to experience that again, nor you or anyone else.
No no, I'm not saying you need them or even assume you have them, I'm just brainstorming examples of stuff that could be relevant, insensitive as it admittedly is. These are extraordinary times, nothing is beyond imaginable anymore.

Well aware you wouldn't have your juminhyo with you as well, but my question was more along the lines of, "you have one in Japan, right", and if the answer is yes, you can also tell them look, I _have_ a juminhyo, I live here, this is my home now, but obviously when I left this whole thing wasn't an issue so I didn't bring one with me but I can have person XYZ help me fetch it if required (I'm assuming you have a friend you can call if needed locally if some paperwork needs to be collected). These steps may all be extraneous, but you want to show them you left before, prepared what documents you could, and can prove that you chose to stay and not return when borders were shutting down not because you wanted to visit the Grand Canyon and go to Miami Beach, but because you had legitimate reasons.
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Old Jun 29, 20, 7:29 pm
  #2150  
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Originally Posted by JJarmuth07 View Post
" think that's a pretty reasonable equivalent of someone whose daily life is in Japan." ---> that's just your opinion and in no way how the Immigration officers will view it, or the reality of the situation in fact.... LTR visa is a very specific for people with Japanese, Sino-Japanese, or other familial connections with Japan... so again, irrelevant...

It's up to the Immigration officers at the airport on the day I land. Barring that red "special" Kanji stamp (which I don't have), I'll have to produce a ton of documents explaining my situation and even then it's not 100% certain. What is certain is that I don't have the correct visa they mention on the document everyone's been referencing. That's plain and simple.
This is true. But once again, the immigration officers are not inhuman. My position would be to explain my story and reasons, and explain why I _need_ to be in Japan, and hope for the best. Though the documents may be insufficient and the red stamp may be missing.
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Old Jun 29, 20, 7:45 pm
  #2151  
 
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Originally Posted by JJarmuth07 View Post
I thought about going too, however I'm worried about 2 things:
(1) I don't have a "Permanent Resident" "Spouse" or "Long Term Resident" visa. Although I've lived in Japan since 2013, I have a work (Specialist - Humanities) visa and not a LTR visa...
(2) I'm not sure what documentation is necessary from the hospital. I'm sure I can get some documents from the physician (there was only one) but I'm not sure what documents they will accept from the hospital. There are bills but I don't think I'm not sure if I can take those.. maybe a copy?
I'm sorry about the predicament you find yourself in. IME Jpn's immigration bureaus are extremely unhelpful when you call/email them.
Have you tried contacting Jpn Consulate for your local area? Your situation does not seem like one that's a slam dunk for being admitted. Rather than speculate and do what you think is the best you can do, perhaps you may need to consider getting an attorney involved. Perhaps ask your employer in Jpn to find you one, if your employer cannot help you directly themselves.

As for documentation from the hospital, you would want discharge summary (assuming your relative's now out of the hospital). Your patient-relative or her healthcare proxy can request that from the hospital's medical record dept. How to prove your relationship to that person, though? I don't know. Maybe affidavit by that patient-relative of yours?
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Old Jun 29, 20, 7:52 pm
  #2152  
 
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Originally Posted by evergrn View Post
I'm sorry about the predicament you find yourself in. IME Jpn's immigration bureaus are extremely unhelpful when you call/email them.
Have you tried contacting Jpn Consulate for your local area? Your situation does not seem like one that's a slam dunk for being admitted. Rather than speculate and do what you think is the best you can do, perhaps you may need to consider getting an attorney involved. Perhaps ask your employer in Jpn to find you one, if your employer cannot help you directly themselves.

As for documentation from the hospital, you would want discharge summary (assuming your relative's now out of the hospital). Your patient-relative or her healthcare proxy can request that from the hospital's medical record dept. How to prove your relationship to that person, though? I don't know. Maybe affidavit by that patient-relative of yours?
As I mentioned in my previous posts, I contacted both the Japanese Embassy in DC and the US Embassy in Tokyo - both haven't been helpful as of yet.

Well noted about the documents. However I think even for Japan an affidavit for relationship of patient is unnecessary. Even in Japan, if you explained it in Japanese, most wouldn't know what it is I imagine. It'll take a while to get the discharge summary so I'll get on that ASAP! THanks!
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Old Jun 30, 20, 5:32 am
  #2153  
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FWIW, the Director of Immigration told the pax I witnessed being denied entry that he could ďreturn after corona was doneĒ. Exact words.

Iíd imagine that the formal paperwork upon denying entry was more clear in this regard to what that may mean, but Iím not certain as even I was told that with my special re-entry permit (which he also said he had), that final discretion would be with an immigration officer upon attempted return to Japan.

Just like in America (and I would imagine most countries), the immigration officer you happen to get has quite a bit of leeway and discretion on your entry and nothing is for certain, unless perhaps you are traveling as military or under special government visas.
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Old Jun 30, 20, 6:11 am
  #2154  
 
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Originally Posted by BRITINJAPAN4 View Post
Yep its the nonsensical way that Japan treats you based on where you were born, not where you have been, not only Japan of course.
Originally Posted by 5khours View Post
No. It's only Japan among the advanced countries.
A Washington Post journalist claims to have spoken with dozens of families who have immigrated to the US, who are suffering family separations like this -

Vihaan Baranidharan and his mom traveled from Dallas to India in late February to see Vihaan’s grandmother, who has stage-4 cancer. During their stay in India, U.S. consulates closed, preventing access to required visa stamps. Then, President Trump issued an executive order, suspending visas for huge categories of immigrants, allegedly to “protect American jobs.” As a result, even if consulates reopen, Vihaan will be blocked from getting the visa stamp needed to return to Dallas.

Denver-based software developer Kranthi Goud and his wife have valid visa stamps, but that they cannot get a visa for their 4-month-old daughter, who was born in India.

https://www.washingtonpost.com/opini...4c6_story.html

I realize that this and the Swiss story that I posted earlier are not exactly the same as the situation in Japan, but don't kid yourself that Japan is unique among advanced countries in riding roughshod over the rights of foreign born residents right now.

And again, for the avoidance of doubt, I think it absolutely stinks that foreign residents are discriminated against. I just want to disabuse you of the illusion that the world's smallest violin is playing a lament all for you.
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Old Jun 30, 20, 10:37 am
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Originally Posted by ainternational View Post
Just like in America (and I would imagine most countries), the immigration officer you happen to get has quite a bit of leeway and discretion on your entry and nothing is for certain, unless perhaps you are traveling as military or under special government visas.
I think visa application forms at the U.S. consulates use to state (possible that it still does) that having visa issued is not approval of a person's admittance into the U.S. Homeland Security officers at the port of entry to the U.S. has the final decision in regard to the admittance into the U.S.

Originally Posted by ainternational View Post
FWIW, the Director of Immigration told the pax I witnessed being denied entry that he could “return after corona was done”. Exact words.
That sounds harsh. Wonder if it is really the case, this guy supposedly has a wife in Japan cannot return to Japan until travel between Japan and the U.S. is back open? Given the current COVID-19 situation in the U.S. that can be long time to come. Wonder if this guy attempt to return to Japan again within next a month or two with all proper documentations, but will be denied entry again?

This is long time ago, but somebody at my mom's work was trying to get the U.S. visa for travel. On first attempt there was insufficient documents and denied visa. Got all proper documents and tried for second time but visa was denied again. Somebody this person knew fond somebody who could connect with the U.S. ambassador. Got appointment with somebody higher up at the U.S. embassy but was denied visa again.

At native country we never have to deal with immigration and visa to own country, so tend not to know how own country deal with immigration and visa issues. I have feeling many countries are similar and these kind of thing may not really unique to Japan.

Last edited by AlwaysAisle; Jun 30, 20 at 10:54 am
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Old Jun 30, 20, 1:32 pm
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Originally Posted by jib71 View Post
I realize that this and the Swiss story that I posted earlier are not exactly the same as the situation in Japan, but don't kid yourself that Japan is unique among advanced countries in riding roughshod over the rights of foreign born residents right now.
What about handling of permanent residents, though? I donít know about European countries but, at least compared to USA, in this COVID-era Jpnís travel/immigration policies seem to be treating its PR much like any other foreigners rather than like its citizens. Citizens vs non-citizens is where Jpn has chosen to draw a hard line. In USA, PR generally are treated more or less the same as citizens in vast majority of situations, and COVID has not appeared to have to have changed that.
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Old Jun 30, 20, 1:49 pm
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Originally Posted by evergrn View Post
What about handling of permanent residents, though? I don’t know about European countries but, at least compared to USA, in this COVID-era Jpn’s travel/immigration policies seem to be treating its PR much like any other foreigners rather than like its citizens. Citizens vs non-citizens is where Jpn has chosen to draw a hard line. In USA, PR generally are treated more or less the same as citizens in vast majority of situations, and COVID has not appeared to have to have changed that.
Yes. That's why I prefaced my comment with the disclaimer that the situations are not exactly the same. But treating the newborn child of two residents as a threat to American jobs is kind of dumb and cruel in a uniquely Trumpy sort of way, don'tcha think? I don't deny that each country's crappy rules are crappy in ways that are only conceivable in the countries that came up with them . My point is merely that brutal family separations and sloppy legislation exist, even in "advanced countries."
With the EU's new rules about people with principal residence in the US not being allowed to enter, you can expect a few more cases where people whose circumstances fall on the wrong side of the blunt measures that governments are hurriedly standing up.
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Last edited by jib71; Jun 30, 20 at 1:54 pm
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Old Jun 30, 20, 3:52 pm
  #2158  
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Originally Posted by jib71 View Post
Yes. That's why I prefaced my comment with the disclaimer that the situations are not exactly the same. But treating the newborn child of two residents as a threat to American jobs is kind of dumb and cruel in a uniquely Trumpy sort of way, don'tcha think? I don't deny that each country's crappy rules are crappy in ways that are only conceivable in the countries that came up with them . My point is merely that brutal family separations and sloppy legislation exist, even in "advanced countries."
With the EU's new rules about people with principal residence in the US not being allowed to enter, you can expect a few more cases where people whose circumstances fall on the wrong side of the blunt measures that governments are hurriedly standing up.
<Quick sidebar> Do you have a link for the wording of the EU's rules. From what you wrote I just grew noticeably in confidence about my European trip at the end of the year.
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Old Jun 30, 20, 6:20 pm
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Originally Posted by jib71 View Post
A Washington Post journalist claims to have spoken with dozens of families who have immigrated to the US, who are suffering family separations like this -

Vihaan Baranidharan and his mom traveled from Dallas to India in late February to see Vihaan’s grandmother, who has stage-4 cancer. During their stay in India, U.S. consulates closed, preventing access to required visa stamps. Then, President Trump issued an executive order, suspending visas for huge categories of immigrants, allegedly to “protect American jobs.” As a result, even if consulates reopen, Vihaan will be blocked from getting the visa stamp needed to return to Dallas.

Denver-based software developer Kranthi Goud and his wife have valid visa stamps, but that they cannot get a visa for their 4-month-old daughter, who was born in India.

https://www.washingtonpost.com/opini...4c6_story.html

I realize that this and the Swiss story that I posted earlier are not exactly the same as the situation in Japan, but don't kid yourself that Japan is unique among advanced countries in riding roughshod over the rights of foreign born residents right now.

And again, for the avoidance of doubt, I think it absolutely stinks that foreign residents are discriminated against. I just want to disabuse you of the illusion that the world's smallest violin is playing a lament all for you.
I'm no fan of U.S. immigration. Quite the opposite, but there is something fishy about both stories. Existing visa holders are are exempt from the most recent executive order, and children under 13 don't require an in person interview for a visa so the visa application process is unchanged from before. (I've been reading Rampell's stuff for over 20 years and I have always found it to be generally fact free .)

I'll say it again, AFAIK Japan is the only advanced country that is denying rights to permanent residents and family members. The stories you cite are very different.

Addendum - And for the record, Rampell is deliberately deceiving her readers by pretending like a visa stamp is different from a visa. If someone doesn't have a visa stamp it means they don't have a visa.

Last edited by 5khours; Jun 30, 20 at 6:38 pm
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Old Jun 30, 20, 6:38 pm
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Originally Posted by 5khours View Post
I'I've been reading Rampell's stuff for over 20 years and I have always found it to be generally fact free.
I'll try and find a better source. I'm impressed that she was sending you her stuff from junior high school.
(Wikipedia has her as being born: November 4, 1984 (age 35 years). Of course, that might be a lie too).
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