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Venice: Lorenzo Quinn's installation for Biennale 2019

Venice: Lorenzo Quinn's installation for Biennale 2019

Old May 15, 19, 12:16 pm
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Venice: Lorenzo Quinn's installation for Biennale 2019

Lorenzo Quinn just had a stunning exhibition opened last week in Venice, several pairs of hands clasped over water symbolizing building bridges. I believe it is close to the Arsenal. This was done for this year's Biennale. We will be in Venice this summer. When we come from the airport to the Grand Canal, will we pass by this? When we eat at Al Covo, are we close enough to walk to this? What is the best way to get to this to enjoy it?

https://www.designboom.com/art/loren...le-05-09-2019/

https://www.urdesignmag.com/art/2019...lorenzo-quinn/
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Old May 15, 19, 2:38 pm
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Old May 17, 19, 8:01 pm
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The water taxi from airport will typically not pass by Arsenale. Perhaps you could negotiate with the driver a price which would include a detour. The walk from A Covo to Arsenale is long, as opposed to the exhibitions in the garden pavilions. Easy walk there from A Covo. I recall vaporetto to Arsenale from gardens.
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Old May 17, 19, 9:45 pm
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Originally Posted by obscure2k View Post
The water taxi from airport will typically not pass by Arsenale. Perhaps you could negotiate with the driver a price which would include a detour. The walk from A Covo to Arsenale is long, as opposed to the exhibitions in the garden pavilions. Easy walk there from A Covo. I recall vaporetto to Arsenale from gardens.
depends on oneís mobility. Thereís a Venetian saying, and Iíll mess it up because I donít remember it exactly, but I know how to translate it exactly. ďsi riesci a camminare come un veneziano, puoi andare dovunque a piedi in 15 minuti.Ē It means that if you can walk like a Venetian (Venetians walk quickly), you can get anywhere in the city within 15 minutes.. Iíve stunned people who take a 40 minute vaporetto ride from Piazza San Marco to the Rialto Bridge, paying 7.5 euros each way on the vaporetto and ride for 30 minutes, when itís only a 7-8 minute walk if you know the way. Arsenale and biennale is an easy walk if you stay along the water, and follow the signs.

Keep in mind tha Biennale exhibits are concentrated in one area of Castello, but ďbigĒ major works are also spread out around the city. Since I havenít seen this one yet and it doesnít seem as if I can get back for a few more weeks, I donít know where it is, but a long walk in Venice is very subjective, since itís not much bigger than NYCís Central Park, and thousands of people run around the entire Park (about 5 miles) before they go to work. So, near and far is a very subjective thing
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Old May 17, 19, 11:56 pm
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Originally Posted by Perche View Post
...{snip}...I’ve stunned people who take a 40 minute vaporetto ride from Piazza San Marco to the Rialto Bridge, paying 7.5 euros each way on the vaporetto and ride for 30 minutes, when it’s only a 7-8 minute walk if you know the way...{snip}...
I guess some of them are people who need the "thrill" of having been on a boat ride on the Canalasso. Cheaper than a gondola or a taxi.
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Old May 18, 19, 7:37 am
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Mobility issues are very real and although many are able to walk all over Venice without ever relying on public transportation, there are those who do not have that ability. I would hate to see people miss out on seeing Venice because they are shamed for not walking everywhere. My husband and I have been to Venice every year for decades and have walked the length and breadth of our beloved city. Earlier this year he had hip replacement following a fall. We are coming in November, but will be relying much more on public and private transportation.
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Old May 19, 19, 11:53 am
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Originally Posted by Perche View Post
Thereís a Venetian saying, and Iíll mess it up because I donít remember it exactly, but I know how to translate it exactly. ďsi riesci a camminare come un veneziano, puoi andare dovunque a piedi in 15 minuti.Ē
So what's the secret, particularly for those of us who don't know Venezia? Is it just planning ahead? Is it the ability to properly read a map? Or should I just resolve myself to being lost all week?

I'm also curious to know if this exhibit (and any others?) will still be on display in late June/early July.
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Old May 19, 19, 12:12 pm
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Originally Posted by iapetus View Post
I'm also curious to know if this exhibit (and any others?) will still be on display in late June/early July.
Biennale runs until 24 November 2019. Was it two years ago that Quinn did the stunning installation of the hands holding up the building on the Grand Canal? That installation got so much attention that it was held on for several months.

I know nothing about the Biennale, though it occurs every two years. I stumbled on this quote just now:

The Venice Biennale is often referred to as the art-world Olympics. Countries from around the world descend on the Italian city to show off the best contemporary art their country has to offer—and to compete to win the coveted Golden Lion for best national pavilion. Around 90 countries participated this year, a record high.
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Old May 20, 19, 1:13 pm
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Originally Posted by iapetus View Post
So what's the secret, particularly for those of us who don't know Venezia? Is it just planning ahead? Is it the ability to properly read a map? Or should I just resolve myself to being lost all week?

I'm also curious to know if this exhibit (and any others?) will still be on display in late June/early July.
There is no secret, except for living in Venice for a long time. Even Venetians can't give you directions to anything beyond two blocks away. They have one stock answer: "Sempre diritto." That means, "straight ahead." Straight ahead in Venice will always lead you to a dead end, or walking into a canal. There are only two straight streets that I know of in Venice; Garibaldi, and Strada Nova, otherwise you'll walk into a canal. You will be lost all week. Resign yourself to it. From the pictures, it seems to be near Arsenale. I go to Venice to kayak the back canals 3-4 times per year, because the parts of Venice that actually have streets were built for servants and slaves. That is why the Main Street along the water near San Marco is called Riva Degli Schiavone, which means "way of the slaves." The actual Venetians were super rich, and didn't use the places with sidewalks; they got around on boats. So the best of Venice is not visible from the streets, only in the back streets with no sidewalks, only accessible by boat. That's why I kayak my way around. It seems to me that this particular piece of art is at Arsenale, where most, but not all of the art is concentrated. That's easy to find. Just follow the "route of the slaves," and you will hit Arsenale. Biennale will be a few blocks away, and there will be signs.
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Old May 20, 19, 2:07 pm
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Originally Posted by Perche View Post
It seems to me that this particular piece of art is at Arsenale, where most, but not all of the art is concentrated. That's easy to find. Just follow the "route of the slaves," and ...
Ah, I'll just head sempre diritto then.
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Old May 20, 19, 2:39 pm
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Originally Posted by iapetus View Post
So what's the secret, particularly for those of us who don't know Venezia? Is it just planning ahead? Is it the ability to properly read a map? Or should I just resolve myself to being lost all week?

I'm also curious to know if this exhibit (and any others?) will still be on display in late June/early July.
Venice can be confusing even to those who know it well. I have difficulty reading maps. If I am unsure of the route, I ask concierge to write out the directions. This is particularly helpful when trying to find restaurant Antiche Carampane. I think this will be next to impossible to find looking at a map.However, if you have written directions, it is easy to find. You will look for little landmarks (e.g. small fountain), or big clock on hotel to right. This is the method which always works for me.....Directions to other places also might include turning right under first archway (sottoportego), and when you see big candy store on corner across of a bar, continue straight ahead. Well, I'm sure you get the idea. If one has a general idea of the direction, signs are ubiquitous with arrows directing you to the area of San Marco, Rialto, Accademia, etc. I have also found local shopkeepers to be helpful when I get off the beaten path. Only once has someone refused to help with directions unless I purchased something.
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