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Cinque Terre: Fines for tourists wearing inappropriate footwear

Cinque Terre: Fines for tourists wearing inappropriate footwear

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Old Mar 16, 19, 6:45 pm
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Cinque Terre: Fines for tourists wearing inappropriate footwear

https://www.italymagazine.com/news/t...1f3d768-259761

Personally, I would double the fines for those tourists caught wearing socks with their sandals
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Old Mar 16, 19, 8:16 pm
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Old Mar 17, 19, 12:30 am
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news we can use, visiting in 3 months. Hopefully keen open hiking shoes are ok and not considered "flip flops"
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Old Mar 18, 19, 3:56 am
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Is bare feet considered inappropriate footwear?

Personally, I despise government regulation of attire of the general public in public places. If someone wants to climb mountain trails in bare feet, fine (pun intended) by me.
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Old Mar 18, 19, 9:12 pm
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It's not a matter of attire. They want to reduce the cost of having to retrieve tourists with broken bones and even more serious injuries every single day! The advantage of bare feet is that most of the people who would choose that would not cost much in terms of rescue: they would give up a few hundred metres after starting.
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Old Mar 19, 19, 3:07 am
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Originally Posted by KLouis View Post
It's not a matter of attire. They want to reduce the cost of having to retrieve tourists with broken bones and even more serious injuries every single day! The advantage of bare feet is that most of the people who would choose that would not cost much in terms of rescue: they would give up a few hundred metres after starting.
Couldn't that be done without charging fines for attire behavior? Even prominent signs at ports of entry/landing and elsewhere along the routes can help to reduce those costs ways. Aren't the costs of rescue and emergency health care chargeable to the person receiving the service and/or to the health insurance provider for the individual injured and rescued? While I don't downplay the hassles of collecting on medical debts across borders, cross-border medical debt collection hassles are not unique to just tourists wearing flip-flops where they may be less suitable for terrain crossing than sneakers or perhaps ever bare feet.

Will the fines apply to going in stilettos?
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Old Mar 19, 19, 4:35 am
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This seems to be the last resort they have! Signs at all Italian ports of entry would be sort of a joke; can you imagine all airports at immigration, road crossings, harbours having signs warning people not to wear "inappropriate" shoes when hiking across the Cinque terre. As for the cost, yes and no. It is chargeable, meaning that, to a large extent, Governments (i.e. citizens' taxes) would pay for the stupidity of people. Finally, as for the different kinds of shoes you mention, I have see myself a young lady having crossed the gorge of Samaria on Crete wearing these very high heel "cloggy" shoes in the early 70s. I guess the lady eventually (years later) must have broken her feet/ankles/legs and wrists several times if she continued doing that. Now to your final question: the answer is simple but I won't give it, I would be suspended by FT!
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Old Mar 19, 19, 8:52 am
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Originally Posted by KLouis View Post
This seems to be the last resort they have! Signs at all Italian ports of entry would be sort of a joke; can you imagine all airports at immigration, road crossings, harbours having signs warning people not to wear "inappropriate" shoes when hiking across the Cinque terre. As for the cost, yes and no. It is chargeable, meaning that, to a large extent, Governments (i.e. citizens' taxes) would pay for the stupidity of people. Finally, as for the different kinds of shoes you mention, I have see myself a young lady having crossed the gorge of Samaria on Crete wearing these very high heel "cloggy" shoes in the early 70s. I guess the lady eventually (years later) must have broken her feet/ankles/legs and wrists several times if she continued doing that. Now to your final question: the answer is simple but I won't give it, I would be suspended by FT!
We pay for the stupidity of others routinely, one way or another. I don't see why this would be the exception and mandate any more governmental attire intervention than a whole bunch of questionable things people do and which cost me one way or another.

You won't give it a stab, about the stilettos? "Go break a leg" used to be a phrase of encouragement, right?
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Old Mar 20, 19, 10:04 am
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Oh, I have something to contribute here

As part of a dare, some friends and I (all men) attempted to go hiking in stilettos 10 or so years ago. The results were 1) the heels kept getting stuck in soil/mud and 2) being cheap generic shoes they mostly broke apart after 15-20 minutes and we abandoned the idea (though I have no idea whether expensive shoes would have fared any better).
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Old Mar 20, 19, 11:02 am
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Originally Posted by KLouis View Post
This seems to be the last resort they have! Signs at all Italian ports of entry would be sort of a joke; can you imagine all airports at immigration, road crossings, harbours having signs warning people not to wear "inappropriate" shoes when hiking across the Cinque terre.
So, it sounds as though that's exactly what they intend to do. From the article:
Originally Posted by Italy Magazine
In an attempt to prevent these episodes from re-occurring, the Cinque Terre Park will run an information campaign prior to the beginning of this year’s high season. Signs will be posted along the routes, flyers and posters will be distributed, and information brochures will be provided when visitors buy a Cinque Terre card (a visitor card that provides access to park buses, trains and paths).

This seems like a very reasonable action to take. What I can't understand is why they didn't try this first before resorting to fines? Given the cost of enforcing fines, you'd think that they would exhaust all other means first ... unless they're only planning to threaten fines.
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Old Mar 22, 19, 2:33 pm
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Originally Posted by iapetus View Post
So, it sounds as though that's exactly what they intend to do. From the article:
This seems like a very reasonable action to take. What I can't understand is why they didn't try this first before resorting to fines? Given the cost of enforcing fines, you'd think that they would exhaust all other means first ... unless they're only planning to threaten fines.
Governments often think of fines as revenue sources to boost government finances. And taxing tourists even fining tourists over attire in a way by way of more fine revenue could be part and parcel of that.
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Old Mar 22, 19, 2:42 pm
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If the threat of fines somehow reduces day trips to CT - even a little - it's a win.
If it reduces s+r costs - even a little - it's a double win.
I see no value in mollycoddling a bunch of people who think taking a hike in the country is the same as a deck promenade.
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