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Visiting Venice will require a reservation and entrance fee

Visiting Venice will require a reservation and entrance fee

Old Feb 7, 19, 2:41 pm
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Visiting Venice will require a reservation and entrance fee

This was announced on Monday. Most people know that the amount of tourism to Venice, perhaps the most beautiful city in the world, is destroying it. The population is fleeing because the streets in the center of the city are packed. In many streets every 20-40 yards or so you have to cross a bridge over a canal. The bridges are impassable because they are packed with tourists taking selfies.

The city has about 600 cruise ships docking there per year, discharging up to 6,000 people each. On many days there are 140 tourists for every single Venetian. Projects in the works to save the city include banning large cruise ships, but that's not until they build a new port, probably around 2022. Putting turnstiles around San Marco Plaza to limit the number of people who can get in there at any time. And they have a tassa di soggiorno (travelers fee), meaning you pay 3 euros per night when staying at a hotel, to help carry out the trash people generate, maintain the canals, etc.

Cruise ship visitors don't pay the tax because they stay on the ship. They spend almost nothing, because they also eat on the ship. They tend to only buy trinkets, but do stop to buy fast food and sit on bridges, church steps, and generally leave a lot of trash, spending minimal money. They get away with not paying the Tassa di Soggiorno. Tourists who stay at AirBnb (very unpopular to residents) also don't pay a 3 euro per night fee to support the city.

Venice has passed a bill to require people to pay a fee to enter it, this way the cruise shippers, other day trippers, and AirBnb'rs don't get to trash the city and leave the residents to pay for it. It's supposed to start May 1st this year. Then they will phase in a requirement that you have to make a reservation to get into the city.

The entry fee will start at 3 euros per person. Then it will convert to 3 euros in low season, 6 euros most of the year, 8 euros in high season, and 10 euros during periods of exceptional crowding. This is called Tassa di sbarco, or landing fee. By 2022 they will require people to make a reservation to get into the city. This was announced on Monday.

The Mayor said that no one without a reservation will be denied access, they will just make it more difficult and more expensive for people who don't have a reservation, because it's the only way to manage the hyper-tourism.

In 2020 they are supposed to start providing some exemptions, such as reduced rates for people who are staying overnight in a hotel and pay the tasse di soggiorno, those with a Venezia Unica Card, children under 7, students, those with disabilities, those who used to live in Venice, those who work in Venice, people with relatives in Venice, members of the armed forces of Italy. If you get in without paying, and they will check, the fine is between 100-450 euros per person.

Source: https://www.veneziatoday.it/attualit...ona-costo.html
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Old Feb 7, 19, 7:05 pm
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I know there is still a lot to be known about the specifics of this plan... But if I am planning to visit Venice (arriving on a train) in May 2019, should I expect to pay >3 euros per person upon arriving at Santa Lucia, even if I am staying the night in a hotel?

Also, slightly related, is early-mid May considered "high season" for Venice?
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Old Feb 8, 19, 12:47 am
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Italy is always crazy with laws, especially Venice. This is a recent event, so things can change. They are trying to get day-trippers arriving by train to contribute to the economy, to keeping Venice clean and safe, as well as the tour ship crowds. The tax will only be 3 euros this year, then next year they will charge by season. May is high season.

That said, this tax is really designed to target people who don't stay in Venice. Day trippers who come to the city and "morde e fugge," or take a bite out of the city then flee, after making the life of locals intolerable. There is no intention to make people who stay in a hotel pay this tax because hotels already charge the Tasse di soggiorno, or travelers tax, and that is 3 euros per room, and you don't have to pay it after 5 days.

Since you are staying in a hotel, you will be OK.
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Old Feb 8, 19, 6:47 am
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What are the regulations applicable to boats when it comes to small private boats landing on non-commerical piers in Venice?
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Old Feb 8, 19, 9:13 am
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I see this article with the statement "The charge is expected to be added to the cost of arriving in the city by either train, cruise ship, bus or plane." I'm not sure if that refers to those starting in 2020. I'm first reading it as meaning the charge will be added to the train fare, etc., and will the hotel stay tax be reduced by that amount? Then there are several logistical questions, such as: if this is part of the train fare when booking on Trenitalia, how do residents, etc., show that they're exempt? By plane, many people arriving at VCE airport may not be going into Venice; maybe the charge will be added to transportation into the island city from the airport.
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Old Feb 8, 19, 9:26 am
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Originally Posted by GUWonder View Post
What are the regulations applicable to boats when it comes to small private boats landing on non-commerical piers in Venice?
Originally Posted by rove312 View Post
I see this article with the statement "The charge is expected to be added to the cost of arriving in the city by either train, cruise ship, bus or plane." I'm not sure if that refers to those starting in 2020. I'm first reading it as meaning the charge will be added to the train fare, etc., and will the hotel stay tax be reduced by that amount? Then there are several logistical questions, such as: if this is part of the train fare when booking on Trenitalia, how do residents, etc., show that they're exempt? By plane, many people arriving at VCE airport may not be going into Venice; maybe the charge will be added to transportation into the island city from the airport.
They haven't explained the details very much. It's hard to imagine them adding to the price of a train ticket because Trenitalia is based in Rome, so they'd never get the money back. The their is Italo train. It would be difficult. They just haven't said very much about the details.
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