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Border Control Question - Dual Citizenship

Border Control Question - Dual Citizenship

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Old Dec 6, 18, 1:09 pm
  #16  
 
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Please see the “rule of thumb” part in my original response, where I addressed the question of authorities.
A foreigner entered Schengen on a US passport. Now that foreigner needs to leave Schengen on the same passport. In future an Italian with the same name will start entering Schengen.
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Old Dec 6, 18, 1:27 pm
  #17  
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Originally Posted by VitaliU View Post
Please see the “rule of thumb” part in my original response, where I addressed the question of authorities.
A foreigner entered Schengen on a US passport. Now that foreigner needs to leave Schengen on the same passport. In future an Italian with the same name will start entering Schengen.
Why? The foreigner is now a national.
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Old Dec 6, 18, 4:42 pm
  #18  
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Originally Posted by KLouis View Post
a) The first statement is not true: as a EU citizen you can enter any EU country, Schengen or no Schengen, with your national ID card! Airlines flying within or to Europe always allow passengers to show an EU national identity card for identification at check-in or boarding, no passport required.
b) There are exceptions to the second statement about entering the USA, although you are correct in warning people to not try it: I know of a Greek colleague who entered the US holding an expired passport and blabla-ing the immigration officer until he was let in. Clearly, he must have blabla-ed the CI agents at ATH as well, unless he was really well connected. This was indeed a very rare case, and unless one is a master in the art of blabla-ing like that colleague of mine, one should not plan this method in order to enter the USA.
I know a good group of US-EU dual-citizens, some of whom have traveled to and even entered the US repeatedly using US VWP country passports (and ESTAs). Sometimes they show just an EU passport but at other times they show a valid EU passport and an expired US passport or do something else. No massive problems at US ports of entry because of that, even as they are to be processed as a US citizen. And no need to be a master of charisma or well-connected for that. The following works to get admitted into the US: claiming US citizenship status and showing a recently expired US passport at US airports of entry in the US. And it seems to have worked for the Greek colleague mentioned above.

Expired US passports are considered proof of US citizenship of the identified person. And US CBP is legally required to admit recognized US citizens into the US even when such US citizen is not in possession of a current US passport. It's been many decades since there was an applicable stipulated penalty for a recognized US citizen to re-enter the US at a regular port of entry without a currently valid US passport.
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Old Dec 6, 18, 7:35 pm
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Originally Posted by GUWonder View Post
I know a good group of US-EU dual-citizens, some of whom have traveled to and even entered the US repeatedly using US VWP country passports (and ESTAs). Sometimes they show just an EU passport but at other times they show a valid EU passport and an expired US passport or do something else. No massive problems at US ports of entry because of that, even as they are to be processed as a US citizen. And no need to be a master of charisma or well-connected for that. The following works to get admitted into the US: claiming US citizenship status and showing a recently expired US passport at US airports of entry in the US. And it seems to have worked for the Greek colleague mentioned above.

Expired US passports are considered proof of US citizenship of the identified person. And US CBP is legally required to admit recognized US citizens into the US even when such US citizen is not in possession of a current US passport. It's been many decades since there was an applicable stipulated penalty for a recognized US citizen to re-enter the US at a regular port of entry without a currently valid US passport.
All fine, only that the chap was not a dual citizen, which is why I wrote this!
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Old Dec 7, 18, 3:20 am
  #20  
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Originally Posted by KLouis View Post
All fine, only that the chap was not a dual citizen, which is why I wrote this!
Did he have a US permanent residency status, any affiliation with NATO military operations/projects or any potential prior or current claim to US citizenship? CBP doesn’t easily allow in non-US persons with no currently valid passport or passport-substituting paperwork.
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Old Dec 7, 18, 7:36 am
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No, he was (and still is) a permanent resident of Greece and he had a 10-year visa with a remaining validity of a couple of years or so stamped in his expired passport. This was before 9/11 (if I'm not mstaken it was in 1997 or 1998) but the most important thing was that he is a master of the art of blabla-ing! Which is why this is anecdotal and nobody should hope (s)he could duplicate it. At any rate, we got off the plane, he went straight and talked to a higher ranking officer "bypassing" the line and then disappeared in an office for about 10-15 minutes coming out with a huge smile on his face.
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Old Dec 7, 18, 7:43 am
  #22  
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Originally Posted by KLouis View Post
Sorry for coming back, but let me put it differently. OP is worried about Italian immigration (border police) giving him a hard time for the reasons he laid out and not a non valid visa at CI. He has no problems with the Italian authoriries because when leaving Italy for the UK he'll show his Italian ID card and the "problem" is solved. You don't address his problem but you think he worries about checking in and not having a visa. While checking in, though, he'll show his US passport to the airline agent (OP is a US citizen) and there is no way that any airline will deny him boarding with a valid US passport. Clear? As for my point b), it was just anecdotal and I wrote myself that this should not be considered by anybody being something to rely on.
Exactly
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