Reasons Not To Stay At A Candlewood Suites

Old Mar 20, 2021, 12:07 pm
  #16  
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Originally Posted by rbAA
Probably, but there were many reasons to stay at Candlewood, at least for me:
1. Low rates/low award night points required and they were frequently on the Pointsavers deals;
2. Full kitchen so I can make my own breakfast and don't have to eat the swill the others places are making;
3. Often more convenient locations, away from the city, though Jacksonville had one closer in and one further out, both of which were reasonable;
4. I frequently got a suite UPG at the north Jacksonville one, and the wifi was great; and
5. Convenient to do laundry.
This is where I'll give IHG credit, at least they can try their hardest. Thanks to the lack of a full breakfast at Candlewood, a kitchen will help matters.
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Old Mar 20, 2021, 12:08 pm
  #17  
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Originally Posted by deltheking
If using ihg rewards - if there is a Staybridge nearby then there is no reason to be staying at a candlewood. Staybridge is superior in every possible way. Nicer more upscale rooms, free breakfast & evening social, pool (some candlewoods have no pool) , the seating den area etc etc...
You're right.
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Old Mar 20, 2021, 7:29 pm
  #18  
 
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Originally Posted by Will Stonehocker
This is where I'll give IHG credit, at least they can try their hardest. Thanks to the lack of a full breakfast at Candlewood, a kitchen will help matters.
Actually, I prefer to make my own breakfast, as it usually involves getting more healthy foods versus the high-carb offerings the hotels have. Especially the (rubber) pancake machine places. And it's usually factored into the price, so I'm not paying for something I shouldn't be eating anyway. While not as good and fresh as my Thai GF makes at home, whenever I stayed at the north Jacksonville Candlewood, I'd shop at the Publix store across the street and could usually find something suitable to make or warm up.
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Old Mar 20, 2021, 8:02 pm
  #19  
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Originally Posted by rbAA
Actually, I prefer to make my own breakfast, as it usually involves getting more healthy foods versus the high-carb offerings the hotels have. Especially the (rubber) pancake machine places. And it's usually factored into the price, so I'm not paying for something I shouldn't be eating anyway. While not as good and fresh as my Thai GF makes at home, whenever I stayed at the north Jacksonville Candlewood, I'd shop at the Publix store across the street and could usually find something suitable to make or warm up.
Good move. And I love to cook my own breakfast too, so we have a lot in common, XD!
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Old Mar 21, 2021, 4:10 am
  #20  
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Originally Posted by rbAA
Actually, I prefer to make my own breakfast, as it usually involves getting more healthy foods versus the high-carb offerings the hotels have. Especially the (rubber) pancake machine places. And it's usually factored into the price, so I'm not paying for something I shouldn't be eating anyway. While not as good and fresh as my Thai GF makes at home, whenever I stayed at the north Jacksonville Candlewood, I'd shop at the Publix store across the street and could usually find something suitable to make or warm up.
I think that nowadays people book an Airbnb instead of a hotel, when they want their own kitchen, laundry, etc. But YMMV.

Although this thread does reflect what happens when large hotel chains allow their franchisees to let standards slip. Stay at a couple of nasty Candlewood or TownePlace Suites and the whole brand is ruined permanently for that customer.
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Old Mar 21, 2021, 7:10 am
  #21  
 
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Originally Posted by craigthemif
I think that nowadays people book an Airbnb instead of a hotel, when they want their own kitchen, laundry, etc. But YMMV.

Although this thread does reflect what happens when large hotel chains allow their franchisees to let standards slip. Stay at a couple of nasty Candlewood or TownePlace Suites and the whole brand is ruined permanently for that customer.
Too many horror stories about Airbnb's especially in out of the way places, and the booking and cleaning fees on a one-night stand can really screw the budget up. Plus, how do you book an Airbnb with IHG points? I've had great luck with the Candlewood properties (as well as TownPlace Suites even in Greensboro, NC aka the pig capital of the US, just driving through on a FL drive-out deal in May a couple years ago now.) Granted, a small sample size, but a cross section of a variety of locations, most of the stays were in Jacksonville, FL though. Many HIX also have laundry facilities for guest use, and I used one at the HI in Boca Raton, so they a little more prevalent than expected.

I do agree with you that a couple bad stays at these types of properties can really ruin your taste for staying at the other brands, but I dealt with that in my Wyndham stays, asking for a full refund (and getting it,) whenever the property didn't meet the standards (even the low standards of some of the lowest level Wyndhams.) But, I've found some Microtels and Baymonts that I'd return to, and have. Not if they are priced near the other, better, chains properties. Same with hotels.com on some Thai countryside stays, a couple where we checked in and checked out within an hour, documenting the problems, as well as discussing them with the manager.
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Old Mar 21, 2021, 10:42 am
  #22  
 
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Another aspect of the decision making process is how much time you have and tolerance for dealing with adverse situations. If you don't mind dealing with bad properties including potentially finding new accommodations real time after you have arrived in a location, then rolling the dice on inconsistent brands to save money may work well for you. On the other hand, if you neither have the time nor the inclination to deal with it, then generally not booking those brands make sense. Granted all brands have occasional bad apples. It becomes a question of the overall dependability of the brand.

Most of my stays are business stays. On business trips I have neither the time nor the inclination to deal with hotel issues. Every so often, I get forced to but fortunately that is a rare exception. Furthermore on business stays (and most leisure stays too), I just want a quick breakfast. Even the typical Holiday Inn Express/Fairfield Inn/Hampton Inn, etc. breakfast (at least pre-Covid), has at least cereal/oatmeal and yogurt available. E.g. you can still have a reasonably healthy breakfast and the convenience factor is great. Many but not all also have at least one fresh fruit offering as well. While I enjoy cooking, I don't have the time nor the inclination to do it while I am on the road for work. Business trips are all about maximizing the time with customers to get the most work done during the trip. Any socializing is usually entertaining customers and prospects. E.g. maximize the productivity of each trip so I can spend less time on the road and more time at home with my family. So lack of even a basic breakfast offering at a property is a big negative for me. In any case, everyone has different travel criteria. That's one of the reasons why there are so many different hotel brands so that they can be targeted for different market segments. Candlewood as a brand fails the dependability criteria for me and for business it also fails the breakfast criteria. Each to their own....

--Jon
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Old Mar 21, 2021, 11:00 am
  #23  
 
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Originally Posted by craigthemif
I think that nowadays people book an Airbnb instead of a hotel, when they want their own kitchen, laundry, etc. But YMMV.

Although this thread does reflect what happens when large hotel chains allow their franchisees to let standards slip. Stay at a couple of nasty Candlewood or TownePlace Suites and the whole brand is ruined permanently for that customer.
The same can be said for ANY business. A bad experience at an Airbnb might swear someone off forever. No matter how irrelevant it is. Consumers can be very fickle.

As with anything, there are pros and cons to each choice. Some people choose Airbnb or Hotel just because. I do think the Airbnb is a tad overrated. Once all of the fees are factored in, it rarely becomes the most affordable choice. I believe your Staybridges of the world are severely underrated. Some of the ones I have stayed at have been absolutely fantastic when you look at price and amenities. For $100-$150 a night to get a nice-sized room, with "kitchenette", pool, included breakfast, alcohol and snacks on weekedays, etc, again, underrated imo. Where Airbnb really shines is choice and location. Sometimes you can get something you can't get with a hotel. Staybridge-type rooms are rarely in the the most prime of locations. That is their downfall.

Candlewood though, yuck.
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Old Mar 21, 2021, 3:47 pm
  #24  
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It's almost a moot question in some areas, where Sonesta grabbed a bunch of Candlewood Suites and rebranded them as Sonesta Simply Suites. But since they're not in the IHG Rewards program, I'll never stay there again now that they've been rebranded, even if nothing else has changed.

And because this grab was much bigger in some regions, in some regions where it happened the number of Candlewood Suites remaining has greatly dropped.

For more about the Sonesta grab, in case you're not familiar with it, see here:

https://www.flyertalk.com/forum/inte...30-2020-a.html
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Old Mar 25, 2021, 6:24 pm
  #25  
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Originally Posted by sdsearch
It's almost a moot question in some areas, where Sonesta grabbed a bunch of Candlewood Suites and rebranded them as Sonesta Simply Suites. But since they're not in the IHG Rewards program, I'll never stay there again now that they've been rebranded, even if nothing else has changed.

And because this grab was much bigger in some regions, in some regions where it happened the number of Candlewood Suites remaining has greatly dropped.

For more about the Sonesta grab, in case you're not familiar with it, see here:

https://www.flyertalk.com/forum/inte...30-2020-a.html
Sonesta also took over a bunch of Staybridges.
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Old Mar 29, 2021, 8:46 pm
  #26  
 
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It really depends on the property. I've stayed at some new Candlewoods that were really nice. I was very happy with them. OTOH I've stayed at a couple of old Candlewoods that were unbelievably dumpy. I was amazed IHG had allowed them to go so long without a remodel. (On that point, I have a tidbit of info. I am currently in a Staybridge that is well beyond the 10 years since the last remodel. The manager told me that the holdup on the remodel is that because of the clampdown they are unable to procure the required new furniture that comes from, you guessed it, mainland China.)

I have no use for a hotel breakfast anyway, as they are only slightly less unhealthy than drinking hemlock.

As for the Sonesta transfer, most of the Candlewoods/Staybridges that went to Sonesta were old ones that I wouldn't stay at anyway. Unless Sonesta pays for massive renovations.
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Old Mar 30, 2021, 8:33 am
  #27  
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Originally Posted by jn in ca
It really depends on the property. I've stayed at some new Candlewoods that were really nice. I was very happy with them. OTOH I've stayed at a couple of old Candlewoods that were unbelievably dumpy. I was amazed IHG had allowed them to go so long without a remodel. (On that point, I have a tidbit of info. I am currently in a Staybridge that is well beyond the 10 years since the last remodel. The manager told me that the holdup on the remodel is that because of the clampdown they are unable to procure the required new furniture that comes from, you guessed it, mainland China.)

I have no use for a hotel breakfast anyway, as they are only slightly less unhealthy than drinking hemlock.

As for the Sonesta transfer, most of the Candlewoods/Staybridges that went to Sonesta were old ones that I wouldn't stay at anyway. Unless Sonesta pays for massive renovations.
A Staybridge that hasn't been remodeled in ten years because of the furniture...what could possibly go wrong?
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Old Apr 4, 2021, 2:53 pm
  #28  
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Originally Posted by Will Stonehocker
A Staybridge that hasn't been remodeled in ten years because of the furniture...what could possibly go wrong?
I've stayed a many places that have been either built in recent years or updated in recent years where "furniture" includes something that includes a place to mount a flatscreen TV (not on the wall, but on something in front of the wall).

Furniture for mounting flatscreen TVs in hotel rooms didn't exist 10+ years ago. In fact, some hotel rooms that have not updated in that long might have furniture designed for a tube TV instead!
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Old Apr 14, 2021, 5:42 pm
  #29  
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Originally Posted by sdsearch
I've stayed a many places that have been either built in recent years or updated in recent years where "furniture" includes something that includes a place to mount a flatscreen TV (not on the wall, but on something in front of the wall).

Furniture for mounting flatscreen TVs in hotel rooms didn't exist 10+ years ago. In fact, some hotel rooms that have not updated in that long might have furniture designed for a tube TV instead!
That's crazy.
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Old Mar 7, 2022, 2:51 pm
  #30  
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To know if your Candlewood experience will be any good, PLEASE READ THE REVIEWS! Really grinds my gears when people don't bother doing so!
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