Experience with long stay at a hotel (HI Express)

Old Sep 4, 2020, 2:00 pm
  #1  
Original Poster
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: PNW
Programs: FreeAgent; DL Silver; IHG Diamond/ Ambassador
Posts: 773
Experience with long stay at a hotel (HI Express)

Has anyone have any experience doing a long-stay at an IGH property?

I am thinking of going back to "school" from mid-2021 until mid-2022. I don't know yet where I will be training at, but my shortlist includes Phoenix, Dallas, Washington DC and Cleveland. I can always rent an apartment wherever I end up at, but I would also have to worry about utilities and parking. I do wonder if staying at an IHG property (e.g. HIExpress) would be more cost efficient and hassle-free. It is only going to be a year. Not sure if being Spire would get me a further discount (or at least an upgraded room).

Any experience staying long-term at any IHG property? Any general advise regarding the above? Thanks!
hikouki is offline  
Old Sep 4, 2020, 2:11 pm
  #2  
A FlyerTalk Posting Legend
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: Minneapolis: DL DM charter 2.3MM
Programs: A3*Gold, SPG Plat, HyattDiamond, MarriottPP, LHW exAccess, ICI, Raffles Amb, NW PE MM, TWA Gold MM
Posts: 100,472
1, Call to negotiate a rate
2. Check the local rules regarding getting an exemption from state and local taxes, usually after 30 days in the same room or on the same reservation.
MSPeconomist is offline  
Old Sep 4, 2020, 3:51 pm
  #3  
Suspended
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: DCA
Programs: UA US CO AA DL FL
Posts: 50,262
Definitely negotiate a contract for the year.

However, consider that all of those cities have long-term stay places which can be a whole lot more pleasant and a whole lot less expensive. Finally, don't presume that a one-year lease on a rental apartment will come with additional costs. Many places have all-in deals including parking and utilities.

Those are all places where location really matters. I would be much happier paying 3-4 extraneous bills each month then living in a lousy location.
Often1 is offline  
Old Sep 4, 2020, 8:50 pm
  #4  
 
Join Date: May 2010
Posts: 320
Ive done a few months at a time for work. Hotels are fine if your company is footing the bill. If not, Id try pick an apartment or airbnb type of place. Way more comfortable and cheaper. Im Spire and you might get a 1 bedroom at a Staybridge Suites as an upgrade. Nothing to strive for, although nice on a long term stay.

there are pros and cons like hassle free, housekeeping, breakfast, social hours, etc, but if paying personally, Id rather keep the money in my wallet.
Often1 likes this.
db1234db1234 is offline  
Old Sep 5, 2020, 11:06 am
  #5  
Original Poster
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: PNW
Programs: FreeAgent; DL Silver; IHG Diamond/ Ambassador
Posts: 773
Originally Posted by db1234db1234
Ive done a few months at a time for work. Hotels are fine if your company is footing the bill. If not, Id try pick an apartment or airbnb type of place. Way more comfortable and cheaper. Im Spire and you might get a 1 bedroom at a Staybridge Suites as an upgrade. Nothing to strive for, although nice on a long term stay.

there are pros and cons like hassle free, housekeeping, breakfast, social hours, etc, but if paying personally, Id rather keep the money in my wallet.
My employer is providing a stipend, provided I sign a contract stating I would be re-employed by them when I finish. I actually would rather not spend that stipend, and return it in case I get a better job offer when I finish.

Great suggestion about Airbnb - I won't be taking any furniture with me when I 'move.' I would rather not, that's why I thought of the hotel.

Would I be able to receive personal mail at the hotel if I decide to stay there instead of an apartment? Would I need to re-register my vehicle to the new state?
hikouki is offline  
Old Sep 5, 2020, 12:40 pm
  #6  
FlyerTalk Evangelist
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: Brighton. UK
Programs: BA Gold / VS /IHG Diamond & Ambassador
Posts: 14,263
Friend of mine planned and did something similar. He lasted a couple of weeks before he started looking to rent an apartment / Airbnb.

It was the simple practicalities of how many clothes and personal posessions he could have with him and where to do laundry and always having to eat out that made him change his mind.
UKtravelbear is online now  
Old Sep 5, 2020, 1:43 pm
  #7  
Suspended
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: DCA
Programs: UA US CO AA DL FL
Posts: 50,262
All four of those cities will have furnished apartments where a one-year lease is almost certainly doable. Furnished might also include a TV, WiFi, dishes, towels and the like. Some places have housekeeping a couple of times a week. Will get you the benefits of easy living without being stuck in a hotel environment.

A good chance that you can have a nice place in a decent location for a whole lot less than what you are considering.
Often1 is offline  
Old Sep 5, 2020, 2:28 pm
  #8  
 
Join Date: Mar 2013
Programs: IHG Spire
Posts: 163
Originally Posted by hikouki
Would I need to re-register my vehicle to the new state?
This is sometimes an issue and smart to think about in advance.

I know that in MT, if you travel here for work you must register your vehicle (personal or company) immediately upon arrival at destination or work county. "Students" are exempted

I spent 1 day shy of 6 months in CT for work last year and would've been required to register my personal truck in CT had I stayed one more day

Edit to add that I'd spent almost 6 months in CT at a couple different Hawthorne Suites by Wyndham and left there to spend two months at a Candlewood Suites by IHG in KS

Last edited by Cyberian; Sep 5, 2020 at 2:34 pm
Cyberian is offline  
Old Sep 5, 2020, 2:29 pm
  #9  
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: san jose,calif
Programs: AA explat,Adm Club,Priority Club, and all nonsense in my comic book mind.
Posts: 751
if you prefer to stay in the IHG family...a Flertalk member used a Staybridge Suite property for that exact purpose... he had the kitchenette, a sort of living room/dining room, and since he was sharing the place with someone, 2 actual bedrooms. a light breakfast was included; they had kind of a happy hour light offering in the evening as well: I dont know if they still do that. Laundry facilities were onsite, and he had free parking,barbeque facilities and swimming pool etc. I am sure he contracted the rate.
bchandler02 likes this.
retirementdreams is offline  
Old Sep 5, 2020, 2:34 pm
  #10  
A FlyerTalk Posting Legend
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: Minneapolis: DL DM charter 2.3MM
Programs: A3*Gold, SPG Plat, HyattDiamond, MarriottPP, LHW exAccess, ICI, Raffles Amb, NW PE MM, TWA Gold MM
Posts: 100,472
Originally Posted by retirementdreams
if you prefer to stay in the IHG family...a Flertalk member used a Staybridge Suite property for that exact purpose... he had the kitchenette, a sort of living room/dining room, and since he was sharing the place with someone, 2 actual bedrooms. a light breakfast was included; they had kind of a happy hour light offering in the evening as well: I dont know if they still do that. Laundry facilities were onsite, and he had free parking,barbeque facilities and swimming pool etc. I am sure he contracted the rate.
That's a genuine extended stay property. HI Express is not.
MSPeconomist is offline  
Old Sep 5, 2020, 5:16 pm
  #11  
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Fort Lauderdale, FL
Posts: 3,360
As someone who used to work in hotels, I think it's worth mentioning that not all hotels are interested in long-term stays. A full-time resident requires a different level of guest service that many hotels are simply not interested in managing. Mail is a good example. It would be unusual for a limited service hotel like a Holiday Inn Express to have a procedure to accept, track, store, and distribute guest mail and packages. Some hotels won't want to start doing new things like that.

Additionally, full-time residents are not always viewed at positively by regular transient guests.

There's nothing wrong in asking. Just don't be surprised if you get a polite "no thank you" when you mention you want to stay for a year.

Finally, never sign a contract unless you've actually stayed at a property on both weekday and weekend nights. Most frequent travelers have probably checked into a multi-night stay at a hotel that looks great online only to discover it has some glaring flaw. Breaking a signed contract at that point might be a huge hassle. (Of course, that scenario can happen with a rental apartment but I'd guess it's more likely at a hotel.)
writerguyfl is offline  
Old Sep 5, 2020, 11:13 pm
  #12  
 
Join Date: May 2004
Location: SIN (LEJ once a year)
Programs: SQ, LH, BA, IHG Diamond AMB, HH Gold, SLH Indulged, Accor Gold, Hyatt Discoverist
Posts: 7,825
I have stayed at a hotel (admittedly an IC in Europe, not a HIX) for about 8-9 months for a project a few years back and our arrangement was just to book 28-30 day stays at our negotiated rate and then we checked out for a weekend (or at least 1 night) and repeated it. The hotel stored our luggage etc.

This way we got to earn points on the stays as well (IIRC IHG has a rule about stays exceeding 30 days not earning) and got loyalty benefits granted and all that. As others said, each hotel will be different whether they are keen on it or not.

Of course, checking in and out is not practical for OP so I second to also explore short term rental or if you got the budget serviced housing / apartments.
bchandler02 likes this.
demue is offline  
Old Sep 6, 2020, 12:18 pm
  #13  
Original Poster
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: PNW
Programs: FreeAgent; DL Silver; IHG Diamond/ Ambassador
Posts: 773
Los Angeles just got added to my shortlist.

Originally Posted by UKtravelbear
Friend of mine planned and did something similar. He lasted a couple of weeks before he started looking to rent an apartment / Airbnb.

It was the simple practicalities of how many clothes and personal posessions he could have with him and where to do laundry and always having to eat out that made him change his mind.
I have nice furniture in my home in the Pacific Northwest. I can't imagine them being transported out of state and back, risking damage each time. Plus my employer is not paying any movers. I told one of my friends that if I end up at an apartment, I will probably just buy a cheap walmart mattress to lay on the floor, and a cheap high school desk for study. And only bring two or three suitcases of clothes. LOL

Laundry scares me though. I'm not sure I want to share the same machine with random people.

Originally Posted by retirementdreams
if you prefer to stay in the IHG family...a Flertalk member used a Staybridge Suite property for that exact purpose... he had the kitchenette, a sort of living room/dining room, and since he was sharing the place with someone, 2 actual bedrooms. a light breakfast was included; they had kind of a happy hour light offering in the evening as well: I dont know if they still do that. Laundry facilities were onsite, and he had free parking,barbeque facilities and swimming pool etc. I am sure he contracted the rate.
Will have to look into Staybridge. I only thought of HI Express because I thought it might be the cheapest option within IHG. Do they allow mailbox services?

Originally Posted by Cyberian
This is sometimes an issue and smart to think about in advance.

I know that in MT, if you travel here for work you must register your vehicle (personal or company) immediately upon arrival at destination or work county. "Students" are exempted

I spent 1 day shy of 6 months in CT for work last year and would've been required to register my personal truck in CT had I stayed one more day

Edit to add that I'd spent almost 6 months in CT at a couple different Hawthorne Suites by Wyndham and left there to spend two months at a Candlewood Suites by IHG in KS
I thought that by staying at a hotel, one can avoid having to re-register the vehicle. Then again, it seems that most DMVs in the USA are requiring out of state vehicles less than a month to get registered in the state.
hikouki is offline  
Old Sep 6, 2020, 6:04 pm
  #14  
A FlyerTalk Posting Legend
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: Minneapolis: DL DM charter 2.3MM
Programs: A3*Gold, SPG Plat, HyattDiamond, MarriottPP, LHW exAccess, ICI, Raffles Amb, NW PE MM, TWA Gold MM
Posts: 100,472
tIn some states, there are different DMV rules for temporary relocations. If you plan to return home after a year (or slightly less), you might be able to avoid changing car registration, etc., although sometimes the new temporary place can have much cheaper insurance rates. BTW, changing the registration, driver's license, and insurance can be linked, with a requirement to do all of them.
MSPeconomist is offline  
Old Sep 6, 2020, 7:02 pm
  #15  
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Fort Lauderdale, FL
Posts: 3,360
Originally Posted by hikouki
I have nice furniture in my home in the Pacific Northwest. I can't imagine them being transported out of state and back, risking damage each time. Plus my employer is not paying any movers. I told one of my friends that if I end up at an apartment, I will probably just buy a cheap walmart mattress to lay on the floor, and a cheap high school desk for study. And only bring two or three suitcases of clothes. LOL
Personally, I can't imagine living like a broke college student in that manner for an entire year.

Should you end up with an unfurnished apartment, you could easily buy an entire room at whatever mass market furniture retailer is in the area. You could even do it all online these days. Everything gets delivered together, often times the next day.

At the end of your year, find a local charity that sells/donates used furniture. With one call, you can arrange for them to come by and take the items. They will undoubtedly love an entire matching set of slightly used items.

Originally Posted by hikouki
Laundry scares me though. I'm not sure I want to share the same machine with random people.
The only way around this fear is to get an apartment.

Originally Posted by hikouki
Will have to look into Staybridge. I only thought of HI Express because I thought it might be the cheapest option within IHG. Do they allow mailbox services?
In terms of mailbox services, you'll need to contact each individual hotel. As far as I know, mail services are not a brand standard with the Staybridge Suites brand.
writerguyfl is offline  

Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Manage Preferences Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service -

This site is owned, operated, and maintained by MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. Copyright © 2024 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Designated trademarks are the property of their respective owners.