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India visa for UK citizen who's outspoken about Kashmir

India visa for UK citizen who's outspoken about Kashmir

Old Feb 17, 20, 12:47 pm
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Question India visa for UK citizen who's outspoken about Kashmir

Reading this story https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/art...try-India.html I'm worried I might not get a visa too. Anyone else had issues before?
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Old Feb 18, 20, 12:58 am
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i wouldn't be surprised with anything this government does....

having said that, i would think there is a huge difference between a public figure & a regular person applying for a visa....they may have their strange reasons to deny the visa for a public figure who is highly critical of their actions but if you start denying visas to everyone who is critical of the government then we are in very troubled times indeed....
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Old Feb 18, 20, 2:55 am
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Originally Posted by GodAtum View Post
Reading this story https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/art...try-India.html I'm worried I might not get a visa too. Anyone else had issues before?

My understanding is she had a visa, albeit an e-visa. I'm guessing that as a prominent person who has been unkind to government policy, she made it onto a list of personae non gratae, one which the evisa process does not (yet!) consult.

The border folk have perfect right to refuse entry, visa or not, for any reason they wish - but on this occasion they claim that the e-visa was an irregular procedure for an MP, who should have applied for a full visa or diplomatic visa through the High Commission in London.


The paper I read this morning claims the irregular visa route was likely a publicity stunt she set up to trap the hapless border force into refusing her. They also heap blame on the airline for accepting her for travel



But as a private individual expressing views privately in the UK, you shouldn't expect any repercussions applied to your travel.
Though be careful about voicing opinions once here: feelings run high regarding this and a couple of other hot topics.
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Old Feb 18, 20, 6:45 am
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I knew a few MP's while I was living in london.They all had diplomatic passports .

I know that evisa is not applicable to diplomatic passport holders. I wonder what passport she was travelling on.

I know that she says that she was on a personal visit but at the same time had an aide ???

Also she wanted a visa on arrival as her evisa was not valid.
Visa on arrival ( without application and ETA then granted prior to travel) is not available for british citizens .

I know that Japanese nationals can get it
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Old Feb 18, 20, 8:45 am
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Officials at Delhi airport told her that her e-visa, which had been issued last October and was valid until October 2020, had been rejected. The trip to India during parliamentary recess was to visit family and friends.

She said: “Along with everyone else, I presented myself at the immigration desk with my documents including my e-visa, had my photograph taken and then the official looked at his screen and started shaking his head. Then he told me my visa was rejected, took my passport, and disappeared for about 10 minutes.
“When he came back he was very rude and aggressive, shouting at me to ‘come with me’. I told him not to speak to me like that and was then taken to a cordoned-off area marked as a deportee cell. He then ordered me to sit down and I refused. I didn’t know what they might do or where else they may take me, so I wanted people to see me.”
https://www.theguardian.com/politics...ountry-kashmir

The eta is a permit/authorisation to travel to India, its not an 'e-visa'. The final decision to issue a visa is still at the border. The UK goes even further, a visa issued by the consulate is also only a permit to travel to the UK, the final decision to admit is with the officer at the border.
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Old Feb 18, 20, 10:38 am
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http://m.timesofindia.com/india/brit...w/74189397.cms

PS: unable to copy and paste the article here

Last edited by ukdoctor; Feb 18, 20 at 11:09 am
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Old Feb 20, 20, 8:29 am
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Originally Posted by IAN-UK View Post
My understanding is she had a visa, albeit an e-visa. I'm guessing that as a prominent person who has been unkind to government policy, she made it onto a list of personae non gratae, one which the evisa process does not (yet!) consult.

The border folk have perfect right to refuse entry, visa or not, for any reason they wish - but on this occasion they claim that the e-visa was an irregular procedure for an MP, who should have applied for a full visa or diplomatic visa through the High Commission in London.


The paper I read this morning claims the irregular visa route was likely a publicity stunt she set up to trap the hapless border force into refusing her. They also heap blame on the airline for accepting her for travel



But as a private individual expressing views privately in the UK, you shouldn't expect any repercussions applied to your travel.
Though be careful about voicing opinions once here: feelings run high regarding this and a couple of other hot topics.
Having a long history of being aware of how the Indian government has functioned over the years and functions now, I have no doubt that the current Indian government especially does use even critical comments made outside of India as a basis to frustrate the ability of some foreign citizens to visit India even for personal trips that have nothing to do with engaging in public criticism while in India. Even when it comes to people who aren’t public figures.

Even OCI status is now subject to revocation for making comments critical of the Indian government outside of India, and sometimes even if it’s done by only some relatives of the persons previously issued OCI status in full compliance of the laws applicable at the time of OCI approval.

Last edited by GUWonder; Feb 20, 20 at 8:36 am
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