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OCI card holder , one way ticket to India - Is it allowed ?

OCI card holder , one way ticket to India - Is it allowed ?

Old Sep 23, 19, 11:58 am
  #1  
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Question OCI card holder , one way ticket to India - Is it allowed ?

My Wife ( Indian citizen , Canadian permanent resident) will be traveling to India on AI next month from YYZ.

My three month old daughter ( Canadian citizen, with OCI card) will be traveling as well.

Does my daughter require a return ticket ? Will AI let her check in at YYZ with only a one way ticket to India ?

Thanks
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Old Sep 24, 19, 2:47 am
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Originally Posted by Toronto1 View Post
My Wife ( Indian citizen , Canadian permanent resident) will be traveling to India on AI next month from YYZ.

My three month old daughter ( Canadian citizen, with OCI card) will be traveling as well.

Does my daughter require a return ticket ? Will AI let her check in at YYZ with only a one way ticket to India ?

Thanks
One-way ticket is fine for passengers with recognized OCI status having the applicable government-issued travel documents. Most OCIs in my extended family have a history of traveling on one-way tickets to India and have had no problems doing so. OCI holders generally have a right for indefinite stay lengths in India, so the airline shouldn't give a validly-documented OCI any more issue with one-way travel to India than they would give to an Indian citizen traveling to India.

In other words, the Indian governmental authorities don't have a problem with such travel. You should consider whether or not your wife should be traveling with an authorization letter from you that permits the child to fly alone with your wife and what that letter should state.
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Old Sep 24, 19, 3:23 am
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Earlier this year we all (me, wife and 2 kids, all with OCI) travelled to India on a AI one way ticket from VIE. No questions asked anywhere. This month I travelled to DEL from MUC on Lufthansa on a one way ticket. Also no questions asked.
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Old Sep 24, 19, 6:34 am
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Originally Posted by GUWonder View Post
You should consider whether or not your wife should be traveling with an authorization letter from you that permits the child to fly alone with your wife and what that letter should state.
is this really required????i've traveled a few times with my son & no one has asked for an authorization letter from my wife....also, my sister & her daughter (both have oci) travel to india 2-3 times a year & she has never been asked for an authorization letter from her husband as well....
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Old Sep 24, 19, 6:52 am
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Oh yes, abduction of minors is very very common in divorce cases and the authorities in the US watch this like a hawk:

https://de.usembassy.gov/visas/trave...egal-guardian/
Children Traveling With One Parent Or With Someone Who Is Not A Parent Or Legal Guardian

If a child (under the age of 18) is traveling with only one parent or with someone who is not a parent or legal guardian, U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) strongly recommends that the accompanying adult have a note from the non-traveling parent (or, in the case of a child traveling with neither parent, a note signed by both parents) stating “I acknowledge that my wife/husband/etc. is traveling out of the country with my son/daughter/group. He/She/They has/have my/our permission to do so.”

CBP suggests that this note be notarized. If there is no second parent with legal custody of the child (e..g., the second parent is deceased, one parent has sole custody, etc.), relevant paperwork such as a court decision, birth certificate naming only one parent, death certificate, etc., would be useful as well.

While CBP may not ask to see this documentation when the child enters the U.S., the U.S. is very sensitive to the possibility of child abduction and trafficking, and the child and accompanying adult could be detained if questions arise about the situation. While the U.S. does not require this documentation, many other countries do, and onward travel could be impeded without a notarized permission letter and/or other documentation. (Canada, for example, has very strict requirements in this regard).

This advice applies to U.S. citizens and non-citizens alike.
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Old Sep 24, 19, 1:18 pm
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Forgot to mention that I will be traveling along with my wife and daughter.
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Old Sep 24, 19, 3:43 pm
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Originally Posted by oliver2002 View Post
Oh yes, abduction of minors is very very common in divorce cases and the authorities in the US watch this like a hawk:

https://de.usembassy.gov/visas/trave...egal-guardian/
The USG doesn’t really watch this (traveling with one parent thing) like a hawk, at least nowhere near as much as Canada does. My relatives traveling from the USA to India via non-stop US-India, US-EMEA-India and US-East Asia-India routes almost never carry such letters when flying alone with their own minor children and they have never been required by the USG to have such a letter. If going via Canada, then it’s more of a different story.

The last time my relatives faced a fuss made by authorities over one parent traveling alone with their own child(ren), it was a fuss from German passport control (as part of a training exercise for a relative newbie employee) and then with an old LH gate agent right thereafter who hadn’t even yet been given the boarding passes/passports. The CBP may often ask, but their is no mandatory legal requirement to have such a letter for US citizen kids departing and/or returning to the US. Much the same for Germany as for the US.
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Old Sep 24, 19, 9:06 pm
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As mentioned in that note from the CBP itself, it is Canada that is generally far more diligent about checking and requiring such documentation, so it would be wise to have it on hand if planning travel with minors and just one parent to/from or transiting through Canada. In the US I have only heard of rare cases of the CBP aksing a few additional questions in some cases on entry to the US. There are no exit checks by the CBP, although presumably airline staff could also ask similar questions, but I have not heard of anyone being denied travel out of the US because of this. Any pointers to actual incidents of this kind would be very useful to judge how much of a concern this really is.

As for India (since that's the focus of this forum), I don't think the Indian authorities care very much at all. It is an extremely common case for Indian families to plan their vacation travel to India with one parent (often the mother) staying longer in India and returning separately with the children. Never heard of a problem in such cases.

It's a different matter if there is litigation involved (divorce/custody cases) as court orders against travel by the minors can be enforced by immigration authorities.

To answer the original question, there is absolutely no problem with flying to India with a one-way ticket and an OCI.
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