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Why Would Hyatt Not Have A Towneplace Suites/Home2 Suites Rival

Why Would Hyatt Not Have A Towneplace Suites/Home2 Suites Rival

Old Jun 20, 18, 8:05 am
  #16  
 
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Originally Posted by s0ssos View Post
I thought HP were the junkiest things available. Horrible service, if you come to check-in at night cause they have one person working everything. At least at other non-full-service places the front desk clerk can focus on checking people in, not doing food as well.
Yes, and HH. I can't remember a time when I checked into a HP or HH after 9PM and check-in was quick. Once, I remember it took 20 minutes because of two customers needing to check in in front of me and the clerk was overwhelmed with phone calls and a couple people ordering food at the bar at the same time.
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Old Jul 17, 18, 5:05 pm
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Originally Posted by MarkOK View Post
Yes, and HH. I can't remember a time when I checked into a HP or HH after 9PM and check-in was quick. Once, I remember it took 20 minutes because of two customers needing to check in in front of me and the clerk was overwhelmed with phone calls and a couple people ordering food at the bar at the same time.
Whatever it was, I feel very sorry for you.
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Old Jul 18, 18, 10:23 pm
  #18  
 
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Originally Posted by s0ssos View Post
Apparently LQ went down-scale (I thought they were pretty nice years ago, but now they are pretty junky).
LQ still has some good options, but when they were single brand, they had a tendency to hold onto some properties they shouldn't, presumably in the name of maintaining footprint. I suspect that as part of the merger, some of their old and tired will get booted over to the Days Inn or Super 8 part of the portfolio where they belong, leaving the newer hotels as LQs and the ability to maintain better brand consistency with those.
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Old Jul 19, 18, 9:48 pm
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La Quinta is Spanish for, Bad Back

At any comparable price point there are better options than LQ
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Old Jul 20, 18, 10:28 pm
  #20  
 
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Originally Posted by Will Stonehocker View Post
Just to clarify, give me a reason why Hyatt is not trying to dip their toes into the mid-scale extended-stay market (you know, Towneplace Suites or Home2 Suites)...
Having stayed at a number of Townplace Suites and a few Hyatt Place properties, I would say Townplace= Hyatt Place. Hyatt House is more similar to Residence Inn and Embassy Suites.
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Old Aug 1, 18, 6:25 pm
  #21  
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Originally Posted by JIMCHI View Post
Having stayed at a number of Townplace Suites and a few Hyatt Place properties, I would say Townplace= Hyatt Place. Hyatt House is more similar to Residence Inn and Embassy Suites.
Hyatt House is more like Homewood and Residence. Hyatt Place is closer to Springhill, Courtyard, Fairfield, Hampton, Embassy, and Garden Inn. My dad should know, and so would I.
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Old Aug 2, 18, 9:41 am
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Originally Posted by Will Stonehocker View Post
That's more on the level of Homewood Suites, Residence Inn, and Staybridge Suites. I'm talking about on the level of a Towneplace Suites, Home2 Suites, Candlewood Suites, and Mainstay Suites. Even though Towneplace Suites is my least favorite Marriott, at least from my experience.
I've never understood why Hilton needs HW and H2 (not to mention ES, though I get that one). To me the HW mostly just seem dated so not sure why it would be considered higher tier than H2 anyway, but both HW and H2 offer studios and separate 1 bedroom options, correct?
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Old Aug 2, 18, 5:18 pm
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Originally Posted by bbriscoe34 View Post
I've never understood why Hilton needs HW and H2 (not to mention ES, though I get that one). To me the HW mostly just seem dated so not sure why it would be considered higher tier than H2 anyway, but both HW and H2 offer studios and separate 1 bedroom options, correct?
There are Homewoods that offer a two-bedroom (the Asheville location from when I was 16 does not, sadly). And Homewoods are getting rennovated (even the Greensboro location from when I was a child). Home2 came out 20 years later as a mid-level extended-stay brand. Embassy on the other hand is nothing like Homewood or Home2. My dad should know because he was exposed to Embassy since the day it was born. And I never did Home2, but I saw images online and they look nice.

Here's the logic:

Jack DeBoer birthed the extended-stay brands. Residence Inn in 1975 (adopted by Marriott 12 years later), and Candlewood Suites around 1995/1996 (bought by IHG around early 2004). Residence Inn was the start of high-end brands, Candlewood Suites was the start of mid-level. Homewood, Home2, Hyatt House, Staybridge, Mainstay, Hawthorn (depending on where you are), and Towneplace are just rivals.

Embassy Suites has no rivals of its own-other than Marriott Suites when it comes to the two-room suite. My dad should know because he did both (this includes my step brothers).


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Old Aug 2, 18, 6:45 pm
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Originally Posted by bbriscoe34 View Post
I've never understood why Hilton needs HW and H2 (not to mention ES, though I get that one). To me the HW mostly just seem dated so not sure why it would be considered higher tier than H2 anyway, but both HW and H2 offer studios and separate 1 bedroom options, correct?
In our family experiment with Hilton this year, a newer Homewood like the one in Moab, Utah can be quite nice with fresh and modern decor and a better than average breakfast included. (And with the price they charge in peak season, they better be) Home2 seems to be targeting the under 30s who want more space than Tru. They're nice for now, but I'm not sure how well they'll hold up and room size is a bit smaller. And the Home 2 breakfast is pretty much toast and some frozen stuff you can warm up in the microwave and pretty much the worst food in the whole Hilton family of brands. (Tru actually does a pretty good continental breakfast for a similar price band including Lavazza coffee)
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Old Aug 3, 18, 6:57 pm
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Originally Posted by beachmouse View Post
In our family experiment with Hilton this year, a newer Homewood like the one in Moab, Utah can be quite nice with fresh and modern decor and a better than average breakfast included. (And with the price they charge in peak season, they better be) Home2 seems to be targeting the under 30s who want more space than Tru. They're nice for now, but I'm not sure how well they'll hold up and room size is a bit smaller. And the Home 2 breakfast is pretty much toast and some frozen stuff you can warm up in the microwave and pretty much the worst food in the whole Hilton family of brands. (Tru actually does a pretty good continental breakfast for a similar price band including Lavazza coffee)
I bet the Home2 breakfast is what most would see in a Towneplace (I'm looking back from when I was 15), Mainstay, Candlewood (location depends) or Hawthorn Suites. I never stayed at Tru, but I've heard of them. And what the hell is Lavazza coffee?

Home2 is nearing a decade old-2019 is the 10th anniversary. Homewood is the father of the brand, as it will be turning 30 in 2019. Hampton and Embassy will be turning 35, Doubletree will be turning 50. As for Hilton Garden Inn, the Cresthil name debuted in 1988, so it's already 30 years old. The Garden Inn name turns 30 in 2020.
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Old Aug 3, 18, 8:44 pm
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Originally Posted by Will Stonehocker View Post
I bet the Home2 breakfast is what most would see in a Towneplace (I'm looking back from when I was 15), Mainstay, Candlewood (location depends) or Hawthorn Suites. I never stayed at Tru, but I've heard of them. And what the hell is Lavazza coffee?
.
Lavazza coffee is very, very roughly an Italian version of Starbucks with both standalone coffee shops and beans sold by the bag. Generally good, IMO, without getting into the more exotic coffees realm.

Tru's decent enough for what it's supposed to be, which is a budget-friendly hotel option for people who want a little more style and better food than you'd get in the Choice or Wyndham option. I wouldn't want to stay a week in one but I see it as perfectly acceptable when you need one for one or two nights near the airport and want to save some money there so you can spend more elsewhere on a trip. (I admittedly have a higher tolerance than most on FT for limited service hotels)

AFAIK, breakfast is not part of the Candlewood brand standard.
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Old Aug 4, 18, 5:34 pm
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Originally Posted by beachmouse View Post
Lavazza coffee is very, very roughly an Italian version of Starbucks with both standalone coffee shops and beans sold by the bag. Generally good, IMO, without getting into the more exotic coffees realm.

Tru's decent enough for what it's supposed to be, which is a budget-friendly hotel option for people who want a little more style and better food than you'd get in the Choice or Wyndham option. I wouldn't want to stay a week in one but I see it as perfectly acceptable when you need one for one or two nights near the airport and want to save some money there so you can spend more elsewhere on a trip. (I admittedly have a higher tolerance than most on FT for limited service hotels)

AFAIK, breakfast is not part of the Candlewood brand standard.
Interesting details about Lavazza Coffee. And we have Hampton Inn, so why is Tru a thing? Candlewood not having a breakfast means they are in some market that the average guest doesn't know about.
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Old Aug 4, 18, 6:19 pm
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Originally Posted by Will Stonehocker View Post
Interesting details about Lavazza Coffee. And we have Hampton Inn, so why is Tru a thing? Candlewood not having a breakfast means they are in some market that the average guest doesn't know about.
Hampton Inn is more expensive than most of the Wyndham/Choice family of brands, and Hilton with Tru (and IHG has Avid in the pipeline) seems to see those cheap and hip brands as a way to get under-30s who want to travel but still have student loans into their loyalty family and have them in place to move 'up the chains' as their financial situation improves.
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Old Aug 4, 18, 6:28 pm
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Originally Posted by beachmouse View Post
Hampton Inn is more expensive than most of the Wyndham/Choice family of brands, and Hilton with Tru (and IHG has Avid in the pipeline) seems to see those cheap and hip brands as a way to get under-30s who want to travel but still have student loans into their loyalty family and have them in place to move 'up the chains' as their financial situation improves.
That, and do Marriott and Hilton have anything like that? I bet Hyatt might.
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Old Aug 4, 18, 7:48 pm
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Originally Posted by Will Stonehocker View Post
That, and do Marriott and Hilton have anything like that? I bet Hyatt might.
Marriott probably has a concept in mind, but they're currently in the mid-merger, and a new brand introduced now would easily be lost in that shuffle. More than anything else, Tru reminds me of Accor's Ibis and Ibis Styles brands or the German-based Motel One- the rooms are small but well-designed and there's an emphasis on making the bed itself and sleep quality high once you figured out how the heck to wedge your suitcase in some wee corner.

One one hand, the goal room night price for Tru and avid is in the $80-$110 night in most markets, and that's a little low by Hyatt's standards. On the other hand, if you figure out the right formula to develop a following for the brand, it's a good price for spreading footprint (not a Hyatt strong point) far and wide into tertiary markets where the 'good' option is a Baymont.
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