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Park Hyatt Beaver Creek, Colorado REVIEW - MASTER THREAD

Park Hyatt Beaver Creek, Colorado REVIEW - MASTER THREAD

Old Nov 11, 20, 7:54 pm
  #466  
 
Join Date: Nov 2015
Posts: 32
I'd argue it was built as a Hyatt Regency Resort... and that's probably still the most accurate description of it. It looks like a lot of the convention/meeting space was converted into what are now the "premium" (i.e. hospitality) suites on the ground floor when part of the hotel was converted to the residence club.

I did have a chat with a manager last year when I was there for Thanksgiving and with the new ownership there is a plan in place to renovate the rooms to bring it up to a luxury standard. This would probably mean a reduction in the number of them (to allow for bigger bathrooms) and a closure for the summer season. The new lobby design is a preview of their intentions.
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Old Nov 11, 20, 7:59 pm
  #467  
 
Join Date: Jul 2020
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Originally Posted by drnilescrane View Post
I'd argue it was built as a Hyatt Regency Resort... and that's probably still the most accurate description of it. It looks like a lot of the convention/meeting space was converted into what are now the "premium" (i.e. hospitality) suites on the ground floor when part of the hotel was converted to the residence club.

I did have a chat with a manager last year when I was there for Thanksgiving and with the new ownership there is a plan in place to renovate the rooms to bring it up to a luxury standard. This would probably mean a reduction in the number of them (to allow for bigger bathrooms) and a closure for the summer season. The new lobby design is a preview of their intentions.
The lobby update was beautifully done, it looks 5 star.
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Old Nov 11, 20, 8:08 pm
  #468  
 
Join Date: Sep 2019
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Originally Posted by drnilescrane View Post
I'd argue it was built as a Hyatt Regency Resort... and that's probably still the most accurate description of it. It looks like a lot of the convention/meeting space was converted into what are now the "premium" (i.e. hospitality) suites on the ground floor when part of the hotel was converted to the residence club.

I did have a chat with a manager last year when I was there for Thanksgiving and with the new ownership there is a plan in place to renovate the rooms to bring it up to a luxury standard. This would probably mean a reduction in the number of them (to allow for bigger bathrooms) and a closure for the summer season. The new lobby design is a preview of their intentions.
It looks and feels very similar to HC Park City have you ever stayed there? If so what’s your comparison?

As a side note the bathroom in our Suite was pretty good. We had a Bath, a shower (separate from one another), two sinks, a toilet and some pictures. Not massive, but not small by any means in comparison to other suite bathrooms we’ve had.

Originally Posted by Tonyr4 View Post
The lobby update was beautifully done, it looks 5 star.
The Lobby and Lounge area (the area directly behind the Lobby with couches, TV’s and Fireplaces looked very elegantly done. I’m hoping the rest of the hotel is done like that for future stays.
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Old Nov 11, 20, 8:59 pm
  #469  
 
Join Date: Nov 2015
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Originally Posted by Matt4200 View Post
It looks and feels very similar to HC Park City have you ever stayed there? If so what’s your comparison?
"Escala Lodges at Canyons Resort" was developed as a condo-hotel project. Hyatt were brought in to manage in 2010 after the recession, and it got pushed into Hyatt Centric to help launch that brand in 2016. It's a barely 100 room property, focused exclusively on leisure travel, and has the whole condo aspect - it doesn't really reflect the modern Hyatt Centric brand compared to a new build hotel.

"Hyatt Regency Beaver Creek" was built as a Hyatt Regency in 1992, and very much reflects the Hyatt Regency brand standards of the time - ~300+ rooms, standard Hyatt Regency room size and layout, standard number of food and beverage outlets, standard amount of meeting space (this is the big one), Hirsch Bedner interiors, etc. Compare it to something like Tamaya where you start noticing that the pieces are all the same even if the packaging is different. It became a Park in 2001 when they and tore out a whole lot of rooms to develop the timeshare and spa components (and thus needed a reason to increase the room rates).

Ultimately it's about which demographic the ownership wants to market the property to - it's why the new Vail property is a Grand Hyatt (place has a *lot* of meeting space) even though it really doesn't "feel" like a Grand Hyatt. Aviara is a Park Hyatt even though it's "too big" and "not modern enough" because it's was meant to be a Four Seasons and they want that customer.
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Old Nov 11, 20, 9:06 pm
  #470  
 
Join Date: Jul 2020
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Originally Posted by Matt4200 View Post
It looks and feels very similar to HC Park City have you ever stayed there? If so what’s your comparison?

As a side note the bathroom in our Suite was pretty good. We had a Bath, a shower (separate from one another), two sinks, a toilet and some pictures. Not massive, but not small by any means in comparison to other suite bathrooms we’ve had.



The Lobby and Lounge area (the area directly behind the Lobby with couches, TV’s and Fireplaces looked very elegantly done. I’m hoping the rest of the hotel is done like that for future stays.
It is, the whole entrance/lounge area is really nice. I will say that you guys are pretty tough here! The rooms are due for an update but they are not nearly as bad as what this forum makes them out to be.

As far as Hyatt owned ski hotels go I think it compares pretty similarly with the Lodge at Spruce Peak in Stowe. I've stayed at the Resort at Squaw Creek as well but it's not quite as nice as the other two. We have planned trips this year to the HC Park City as I mentioned earlier and the GH Vail, I'm looking forward to both.

Last edited by Tonyr4; Nov 11, 20 at 9:14 pm
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Old Nov 11, 20, 9:11 pm
  #471  
 
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Originally Posted by drnilescrane View Post
"Escala Lodges at Canyons Resort" was developed as a condo-hotel project. Hyatt were brought in to manage in 2010 after the recession, and it got pushed into Hyatt Centric to help launch that brand in 2016. It's a barely 100 room property, focused exclusively on leisure travel, and has the whole condo aspect - it doesn't really reflect the modern Hyatt Centric brand compared to a new build hotel.

"Hyatt Regency Beaver Creek" was built as a Hyatt Regency in 1992, and very much reflects the Hyatt Regency brand standards of the time - ~300+ rooms, standard Hyatt Regency room size and layout, standard number of food and beverage outlets, standard amount of meeting space (this is the big one), Hirsch Bedner interiors, etc. Compare it to something like Tamaya where you start noticing that the pieces are all the same even if the packaging is different. It became a Park in 2001 when they and tore out a whole lot of rooms to develop the timeshare and spa components (and thus needed a reason to increase the room rates).

Ultimately it's about which demographic the ownership wants to market the property to - it's why the new Vail property is a Grand Hyatt (place has a *lot* of meeting space) even though it really doesn't "feel" like a Grand Hyatt. Aviara is a Park Hyatt even though it's "too big" and "not modern enough" because it's was meant to be a Four Seasons and they want that customer.
So I take it you haven’t stayed at Hyatt Centric Park City (Formerly Escala Lodge)?

Whether it reflects other Hyatt Centric properties I feel the properties are very similar, being “in the center of the action” and mainly focused on leisure, especially with the new Exhale Spa.

Every guest there when we stayed was definitely there for leisure. Many were doing retreats and some even a marriage. I believe if people want a more business stay they’d stay at the Grand which historically has been a business oriented brand with meetings etc.

I definitely feel like they want to (or should want to) market to high end leisure travelers. Their guests feel like Hyatt Centric guests compared to guests you’d expect to see at Park Hyatt NYC IMHO.
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Old Nov 11, 20, 9:15 pm
  #472  
 
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Location: Los Angeles
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Originally Posted by Tonyr4 View Post
It is, the whole entrance/lounge area is really nice. I will say that you guys are pretty tough here! The rooms are due for an update but they are not nearly as bad as what this forum makes them out to be.
Agreed!

As far as the rooms they are enjoyable don’t get me wrong I’m just saying the Highlands Suite definitely isn’t worth 60k points a Night or $1,000+. It did feel a little dated, but it was still a great room, just not worth extra to us personally. The bathroom was nice for us as well. We liked it being a little more spacious. Most suites we’ve gotten have two smaller bathrooms (one in each room) rather than 1 Large one. We definitely prefer 1 Large than two small.
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Old Nov 11, 20, 9:36 pm
  #473  
 
Join Date: Nov 2015
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Originally Posted by Matt4200 View Post
So I take it you haven’t stayed at Hyatt Centric Park City (Formerly Escala Lodge)?

I definitely feel like they want to (or should want to) market to high end leisure travelers. Their guests feel like Hyatt Centric guests compared to guests you’d expect to see at Park Hyatt NYC IMHO.
I have, but that fact isn’t relevant (apart from the argument that they are similar... which they are not at all in my opinion).

The point is hotel branding is determined by market position and amenities, not brand statements. Hyatt Centric is an upper-upscale/compact full service brand. A spa and full set of amenities aren’t required.

Park Hyatt is a luxury brand. It guarantees a certain level of amenity, including a spa. Considering the $200 a night gap in ADR between the two hotels and their respective positions within their comp sets I think they’ve made the right choice. I also stand by the fact the place aesthetically feels like a cookie cutter 1990s Hyatt developed Regency.

Beaver Creek is too big to be a Centric (and successfully competes with the Ritz) and Escala is too small and too downscale to be a Park.
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Last edited by drnilescrane; Nov 11, 20 at 9:50 pm
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Old Nov 11, 20, 10:19 pm
  #474  
 
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Originally Posted by drnilescrane View Post
I have, but that fact isn’t relevant (apart from the argument that they are similar... which they are not at all in my opinion).

The point is hotel branding is determined by market position and amenities, not brand statements. Hyatt Centric is an upper-upscale/compact full service brand. A spa and full set of amenities aren’t required.

Park Hyatt is a luxury brand. It guarantees a certain level of amenity, including a spa. Considering the $200 a night gap in ADR between the two hotels and their respective positions within their comp sets I think they’ve made the right choice. I also stand by the fact the place aesthetically feels like a cookie cutter 1990s Hyatt developed Regency.

Beaver Creek is too big to be a Centric (and successfully competes with the Ritz) and Escala is too small and too downscale to be a Park.
How are they not similar??

They are both Ski Resorts
They both look very similar internally
They both cater to upper class clientele

As far as the “spa” it didn’t feel very elegant at all. It honestly felt like a spa at a Hyatt Centric. Definitely nowhere close to the Marilyn Monroe Spa at the Manchester Grand in San Diego and that’s not even a Park Hyatt!

As far as the “gap” in the ADR their prices seem almost identical from my checking off season and on season pricing from summer 2020-summer 2021.

It’s laughable for you to say it’s “too big” to be a Centric.

Hyatt Centric Waikiki Beach offers 230 contemporary rooms, including 30 modern suites”

“Each of the 419 guestrooms at
Hyatt CentricMagnificent Mile is spacious, sophisticated, and stylishly appointed.”

So 300 rooms isn’t out of line for the Centric Brand at all just saying.

As far as it being a “luxury brand with luxury amenities” it definitely didn’t deliver that at all. If that was the goal they severely missed the mark. I definitely wouldn’t categorize it as being worth the same or delivering the same level treatment and amenities as PH NYC. My personal evaluation is it’s worth $200-$300 a night at most and that’s in line with Hyatt Centric branding rather than Park Hyatt.
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Old Nov 11, 20, 10:54 pm
  #475  
 
Join Date: Jul 2014
Location: NYC
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Anyone stay in the somewhat recently renovated fireside suites? Are those closer to what one would normally expect from a PH? Trying to manage expectations here...
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Old Nov 11, 20, 11:19 pm
  #476  
 
Join Date: Nov 2015
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Originally Posted by Matt4200 View Post
They both look very similar internally
They really, really don't.

Originally Posted by Matt4200 View Post
They both cater to upper class clientele
They don't target the same customer at all. One is a lifestyle hotel. The other is a luxury full service hotel. Because anecdotally - during the middle of the pandemic - you feel the clientele is similar doesn't seem to be backed by the data. The place is owned by a REIT, it's all available from the SEC.

Beaver Creek competes with the Ritz Bachelor Gulch. It's the only slope side full service hotel in the village. It sold recently for about $750,000 a key - the market values it as a luxury property.

Hyatt Centric Park City isn't even in the top 5 of a market which includes a St Regis, a Waldorf Astoria and a Montage.

Hyatt Centric is designed to be an oddball brand that lets owners skip features or cheap out on room fit out to allow oddball developments - hence the wild outliers in room count that are possible.

I would have agreed with you the place is nothing special (until I stayed at that awful Grand Hyatt in Vail) and doesn't deliver on the brand promise, but it checks all the boxes.

I am never, ever going to agree with you the place is positioned as a lifestyle hotel, would be successful as a lifestyle hotel, tries to attract that customer, or even "feels" like one.
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Old Nov 11, 20, 11:41 pm
  #477  
 
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Originally Posted by drnilescrane View Post
They really, really don't.



They don't target the same customer at all. One is a lifestyle hotel. The other is a luxury full service hotel. Because anecdotally - during the middle of the pandemic - you feel the clientele is similar doesn't seem to be backed by the data. The place is owned by a REIT, it's all available from the SEC.

Beaver Creek competes with the Ritz Bachelor Gulch. It's the only slope side full service hotel in the village. It sold recently for about $750,000 a key - the market values it as a luxury property.

Hyatt Centric Park City isn't even in the top 5 of a market which includes a St Regis, a Waldorf Astoria and a Montage.

Hyatt Centric is designed to be an oddball brand that lets owners skip features or cheap out on room fit out to allow oddball developments - hence the wild outliers in room count that are possible.

I would have agreed with you the place is nothing special (until I stayed at that awful Grand Hyatt in Vail) and doesn't deliver on the brand promise, but it checks all the boxes.

I am never, ever going to agree with you the place is positioned as a lifestyle hotel, would be successful as a lifestyle hotel, tries to attract that customer, or even "feels" like one.

To each their own, many people have disagreed that this property was branded a Park Hyatt as it isn’t luxurious at all. Also, I don’t believe it even competes with the nearby Ritz. Everyone here and elsewhere has said the Ritz is the clear winner in terms or the rooms/suites, dining and the overall property. With a lot being closed we found ourselves frequently going to Avon, Edwards and Vail throughout our stay for food/activities. So even the location factor for us went out the window for PH BC.

The Hyatt Centric name speaks to two things: being “in the middle of the action” and “in the know.” It’s about being in the heart of the action with the locals, having the inside-scoop on the best places to go and always feeling like a welcome visitor, not a tourist.”

If you believe it doesn’t fit this statement to a tee, which it absolutely does, there’s nothing more to be said.
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Old Nov 12, 20, 6:42 am
  #478  
 
Join Date: Jul 2020
Posts: 70
Originally Posted by drnilescrane View Post
They really, really don't.



They don't target the same customer at all. One is a lifestyle hotel. The other is a luxury full service hotel. Because anecdotally - during the middle of the pandemic - you feel the clientele is similar doesn't seem to be backed by the data. The place is owned by a REIT, it's all available from the SEC.

Beaver Creek competes with the Ritz Bachelor Gulch. It's the only slope side full service hotel in the village. It sold recently for about $750,000 a key - the market values it as a luxury property.

Hyatt Centric Park City isn't even in the top 5 of a market which includes a St Regis, a Waldorf Astoria and a Montage.

Hyatt Centric is designed to be an oddball brand that lets owners skip features or cheap out on room fit out to allow oddball developments - hence the wild outliers in room count that are possible.

I would have agreed with you the place is nothing special (until I stayed at that awful Grand Hyatt in Vail) and doesn't deliver on the brand promise, but it checks all the boxes.

I am never, ever going to agree with you the place is positioned as a lifestyle hotel, would be successful as a lifestyle hotel, tries to attract that customer, or even "feels" like one.
That all makes sense.........On another note, what makes the GH in Vail so bad? We have a trip planned there later this year.
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Old Nov 12, 20, 8:12 am
  #479  
 
Join Date: Aug 2019
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The Hyatt Centric name speaks to two things: being “in the middle of the action” and “in the know.” It’s about being in the heart of the action with the locals, having the inside-scoop on the best places to go and always feeling like a welcome visitor, not a tourist.”

If you believe it doesn’t fit this statement to a tee, which it absolutely does, there’s nothing more to be said.
I suppose this would hold true for Beaver Creek, but it's another metric in which the Escala Lodge in Park City doesn't feel like a Centric...it's quite distant from the "middle of the action" in downtown Park City. That's especially true in the non-ski season.
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Old Nov 12, 20, 9:54 am
  #480  
 
Join Date: Nov 2015
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Originally Posted by Matt4200 View Post
The Hyatt Centric name speaks to two things: being “in the middle of the action” and “in the know.” It’s about being in the heart of the action with the locals, having the inside-scoop on the best places to go and always feeling like a welcome visitor, not a tourist.”

If you believe it doesn’t fit this statement to a tee, which it absolutely does, there’s nothing more to be said.
I stand by the fact I've explained thoroughly that it does not - it's not a lifestyle oriented compact hotel, it's a lumbering 1990s Hyatt Regency resort that has a fractional ownership wing (that took a lot of the good suites with it). Hyatt Centric is a brand that allows owners with urban properties they want to redevelop to join the Hyatt system for less cost than having to provide the full suite of amenities that a Regency, Grand or Park demands - which would require development from scratch as a full service hotel. Hyatt Centric Park City is a Hyatt Centric because it's actually a condo building pretending to be a hotel.

“in the middle of the action” and “in the know” means "we'll let you have less amenities because you can just tell the guest to leave the property and find something in the neighborhood" and "we'll let you run with a much smaller front office because Millennials do everything themselves or on the app".
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