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Applying for hong kong visit visa...

Applying for hong kong visit visa...

Old May 31, 20, 1:16 pm
  #1  
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Applying for hong kong visit visa...

Hi guys.... I am planning to visit hong kong after this pandemic is over but unfortunately my PAR is unsuccessful so i am planning to apply for visit visa ... I have checked the hk immigration official website for document requirements but currently I am unemployed ... I have completed by studies but I don't work... so Basically I am not paying any tax so I don't have any document related to that... Apart from my bank statement which document can I provide for my financial status to support my Visa application ? My parents have fixed deposit in bank with my name also in it .. Can this be used as financial status document ? If i fill unemployed in the visa form there be any problem in getting visa ?...
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Old Jun 2, 20, 3:47 am
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First, what passport will you be traveling on?

Hong Kong has many countries that are VISA free access. 85 countries have VISA free access 90 days, 25 countries have VISA free access 30 days status.
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Old Jun 2, 20, 3:56 am
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Originally Posted by Taiwaned View Post
First, what passport will you be traveling on?

Hong Kong has many countries that are VISA free access. 85 countries have VISA free access 90 days, 25 countries have VISA free access 30 days status.
I hold an Indian passport... As indians need PAR to visit hong kong visa free but my PAR is not successful so only way to visit hong kong is to get a visit visa from hong kong immigration directly....
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Old Jun 2, 20, 4:29 am
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The Hong Kong Immigration Department does tend to profile visitors, and after a spate of problems a few years ago with young visitors from India it put in place the PAR pre-clearance system for Indian travellers.

The OP's problem -- if he's a young male traveller from India without a good job in India -- is that he fits precisely the profile that led to introduction of the PAR system.
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Old Jun 2, 20, 4:45 am
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Originally Posted by 889 View Post
The Hong Kong Immigration Department does tend to profile visitors, and after a spate of problems a few years ago with young visitors from India it put in place the PAR pre-clearance system for Indian travellers.

The OP's problem -- if he's a young male traveller from India without a good job in India -- is that he fits precisely the profile that led to introduction of the PAR system.
​​​​​​I just want to know what more documents can be submitted to prove my financial status apart from my bank statement... I am not working but my parents are financially strong... As I don't work so I don't earn anything... I have some life insurance policies which I pay the installment yearly so can this be used as financial document ?
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Old Jun 2, 20, 5:47 am
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This is really a problem particular to travellers from India, young male travellers in particular, and you probably won't find anyone here who can give you reliable first-hand advice because nobody has first-hand experience with your particular situation.

But as a general principal, I suspect the Immigration Department is looking for strong reasons you'll return to India after your stay. Basically that means a good job and perhaps a family. Money in the bank, unless we're talking about the truly wealthy, probably doesn't count for that much if you're young and unemployed.

Keep in mind, too, that you don't want to build up a record of failed visa applications! Much better to wait until you've got that good job. Or visit somewhere else in the region more welcoming to Indian visitors.
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Old Jun 2, 20, 8:42 am
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Originally Posted by 889 View Post
This is really a problem particular to travellers from India, young male travellers in particular, and you probably won't find anyone here who can give you reliable first-hand advice because nobody has first-hand experience with your particular situation.

But as a general principal, I suspect the Immigration Department is looking for strong reasons you'll return to India after your stay. Basically that means a good job and perhaps a family. Money in the bank, unless we're talking about the truly wealthy, probably doesn't count for that much if you're young and unemployed.

Keep in mind, too, that you don't want to build up a record of failed visa applications! Much better to wait until you've got that good job. Or visit somewhere else in the region more welcoming to Indian visitors.
Ok thanks for your time and advice....
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Old Jun 3, 20, 11:38 pm
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Originally Posted by Akshayshah View Post
...but currently I am unemployed...
Unfortunately, this pretty much makes it the end of road.

Originally Posted by 889 View Post
But as a general principal, I suspect the Immigration Department is looking for strong reasons you'll return to India after your stay.
Not exactly but close.

The reason why Hong Kong restricts Indian nationals is many of them end up seeking asylum in Hong Kong.

Specifically, for some times, Hong Kong has been getting a rush of South Asian, as well as other places, claiming they intended to seek asylum. What interesting is Hong Kong does not give out asylum but instead, refer qualified persons to UNHCR. In the past, Hong Kong allowed these people to work. This encouraged a lot of people coming to Hong Kong for this practical no-obligation work visa.

Racist or not, unfortunately, many of them are Indians.

Also - not Indian-specific, many of these people have caused major public safety problems in Hong Kong.

That's why the Department uses PAR to block (not even screen) Indians from coming to Hong Kong.
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Old Jun 4, 20, 1:24 am
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Not exactly, but close.

UNHCR is no longer directly involved in Refugee Status Determinations ("RSD") in Hong Kong:

"Because Hong Kong is not a signatory to the 1951 Convention relating to the Status of Refugees, and has no legal framework governing the granting of asylum, UNHCR has traditionally been responsible for RSD and for providing assistance to asylum-seekers and refugees. Following a landmark court decision, the Hong Kong government introduced the Unified Screening Mechanism (USM) to screen non-refoulement, or protection, claims on 3 March 2014. Since then, UNHCR is no longer involved in direct RSD in the territory, playing instead an advisory and capacity building role."

https://www.unhcr.org/hk/en/about-us/hong-kong

As well, I'm trying hard to recall any time when refugees or asylum-seekers could work in Hong Kong. Indeed, nowadays they're permitted to live in the community, while decades ago the Vietnamese boat people were locked up at places like Whitehead.
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Old Jun 4, 20, 2:06 am
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Originally Posted by 889 View Post
UNHCR is no longer directly involved in Refugee Status Determinations ("RSD") in Hong Kong...
I believe you misunderstand what I have said. I mentioned:

Originally Posted by garykung View Post
What interesting is Hong Kong does not give out asylum but instead, refer qualified persons to UNHCR.
The qualified persons are the persons who have been undergone USM. Because Hong Kong does not give asylum, so even with a positive USM result, they won't stay in Hong Kong. Instead, UNHCR will still help those qualified for resettlement.

Originally Posted by 889 View Post
As well, I'm trying hard to recall any time when refugees or asylum-seekers could work in Hong Kong. Indeed, nowadays they're permitted to live in the community, while decades ago the Vietnamese boat people were locked up at places like Whitehead.
Not everyone was locked up.

AFAICT - during the boat people time, if the refugee status had been established, they would allowed to exit the camp for certain hours, and subject to a curfew. They would be able to work in Hong Kong while waiting for resettlement. Also - even nowadays, the Immigration Department will exercise discretion to those status have been established.

Seekers, on the other hand, are in different fates. Hong Kong never allowed seekers to work.
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Old Jun 4, 20, 10:24 pm
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Originally Posted by garykung View Post
I believe you misunderstand what I have said. I mentioned:



The qualified persons are the persons who have been undergone USM. Because Hong Kong does not give asylum, so even with a positive USM result, they won't stay in Hong Kong. Instead, UNHCR will still help those qualified for resettlement.



Not everyone was locked up.

AFAICT - during the boat people time, if the refugee status had been established, they would allowed to exit the camp for certain hours, and subject to a curfew. They would be able to work in Hong Kong while waiting for resettlement. Also - even nowadays, the Immigration Department will exercise discretion to those status have been established.

Seekers, on the other hand, are in different fates. Hong Kong never allowed seekers to work.
Agreed not everyone was locked up. I worked at the refugee camp at Kai Tak and a fair number were allowed out each day to work, but they had to return and check back in each night. I do not remember the exact criteria for who was allowed but definitely no recent arrivals nor anyone with a discipline history (very few of those).

I do not see HK allowing any additional societal pressure at this point in time. The government will not consider it in their interest to have any leniency towards asylum seekers and I expect policy interpretation will reflect this.
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