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Annoying / Dishonest Hong Kong Taxi Drivers

Annoying / Dishonest Hong Kong Taxi Drivers

Old Apr 15, 19, 2:09 pm
  #61  
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Originally Posted by kaka View Post
$10k for repeat offenders would suffice.
The needed penalty is in fact the revocation of taxi endorsement on the license. This is the only way to deter drivers from violating the taxi law.

Originally Posted by kaka View Post
but no, the police wont even bother with fight AGAINST triads (in TST) or chinese women “working” in the Mong Kok area (or where not).
Prostitution is not illegal per se in Hong Kong. Controlling prostitution, on the other hand, is illegal.

The problem with the triads is many triads have gone legitimate on their businesses, such as minibus. So the police need incriminating evidence in order to get them.
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Old Apr 15, 19, 5:35 pm
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Originally Posted by wco81 View Post
from TST to the Air Express station and the fare was only about $3-4 USD. The driver was disappointed at the short fare but that's what I clearly indicated in the app.
IIRC, the Uber app the driver uses doesn't display your destination until the ride starts. This prevents them from ignoring the short trips.

She wanted to know if I wanted to go to the airport but I had a return ticket on the train.
Cabbies will do this as well, especially if there's more than one person. At two people, it's not much more for the cab, and for 3 people a cab is cheaper than the train.

Originally Posted by garykung View Post
The needed penalty is in fact the revocation of taxi endorsement on the license. This is the only way to deter drivers from violating the taxi law.
At the very least, a 30-day revocation upon first offence. If you make the suspension penalty only for repeat offenders, that gives every driver a "get of jail free" card for their first offence, considering that the typical fine is small in relation to what they make by cheating. That, combined with the low likelihood of getting caught and prosecuted, would mean that the status quo would continue, since most drivers never get a first conviction.


Prostitution is not illegal per se in Hong Kong.
The reference was to "chinese women “working” in the Mong Kok area." Prostitution may not be illegal, as long as the person doing it has the right to work in Hong Kong. But if they don't, then they're violating their condition of stay as an illegal worker even if they are otherwise legally present, and even if they're "self-employed" and no pimping is involved. I suspect that the above was not referring to Hong Kong Chinese.
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Old Apr 17, 19, 11:41 pm
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Originally Posted by Steve M View Post
I've also run into it at places like the JW Marriott, where several taxis, one after the other, drove off once the bellman told them my destination. I asked him if that wasn't improper, and he just shrugged. That's an interesting case, because I know that in some other cities, a taxi driver doing that at a nice hotel would be noted by the bellman and potentially find themselves unwelcome to come back.
I have this happen almost every single time at Conrad.
I really resent Conrad's attitude about this. Bellmen really don't put up any fight with the cab drivers to secure a ride for you. I've gone into the lobby to ask concierge for help a couple of times. They tell me they recognize it's a problem but they can't do anything about it. They acknowledge that what the cab drivers are doing is illegal but they say the hotel is not going to report taxi drivers because that just creates more problems. One time the concierge guy had the audacity to laugh in my face when I told him no one would take me to HK Station. He said arrogantly that there's no chance I'd find any taxi to take me there at that hour (~4pm) and completely dissed me when I was desperate with multiple suitcases and small kids in tow.
On the other hand, Intercontinental bellmen really seem to fight these cab drivers on your behalf.
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Old Apr 18, 19, 12:00 am
  #64  
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Originally Posted by evergrn View Post
I have this happen almost every single time at Conrad.
I really resent Conrad's attitude about this. Bellmen really don't put up any fight with the cab drivers to secure a ride for you. I've gone into the lobby to ask concierge for help a couple of times. They tell me they recognize it's a problem but they can't do anything about it. They acknowledge that what the cab drivers are doing is illegal but they say the hotel is not going to report taxi drivers because that just creates more problems. One time the concierge guy had the audacity to laugh in my face when I told him no one would take me to HK Station. He said arrogantly that there's no chance I'd find any taxi to take me there at that hour (~4pm) and completely dissed me when I was desperate with multiple suitcases and small kids in tow.
On the other hand, Intercontinental bellmen really seem to fight these cab drivers on your behalf.
I'm wondering what the fighting will achieve.
In cities like HCMC or Siem Reap, taxis outnumber customers so bellmen can discriminate.

What can you do in Hong Kong, where customers outnumber cabbies?
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Old Apr 18, 19, 1:32 am
  #65  
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Looks like HK will allow apps. which hail taxis, including one backed by Uber, but not the Uber app. itself.

Two new apps. launching there this month, including the eTaxi app supposedly backed by Uber?:

https://www.scmp.com/news/hong-kong/...-rivalries-set


The comments are interesting. Widespread hate for taxis and a reported 16% drop in ridership.

No wonder the govt. will do anything to protect them. HK is held up as the model of capitalism but it's obviously motivated by medallions to suppress competition.
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Old Apr 18, 19, 2:21 am
  #66  
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Originally Posted by wco81 View Post
Looks like HK will allow apps. which hail taxis, including one backed by Uber, but not the Uber app. itself.

Two new apps. launching there this month, including the eTaxi app supposedly backed by Uber?:

https://www.scmp.com/news/hong-kong/...-rivalries-set


The comments are interesting. Widespread hate for taxis and a reported 16% drop in ridership.

No wonder the govt. will do anything to protect them. HK is held up as the model of capitalism but it's obviously motivated by medallions to suppress competition.
Medallion owners https://webb-site.com/articles/roadcartels.asp. Basically licences became investment assets which owners are keen to protect.
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Old Apr 18, 19, 4:10 am
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Originally Posted by evergrn View Post
I have this happen almost every single time at Conrad.
I really resent Conrad's attitude about this. Bellmen really don't put up any fight with the cab drivers to secure a ride for you. I've gone into the lobby to ask concierge for help a couple of times. They tell me they recognize it's a problem but they can't do anything about it. They acknowledge that what the cab drivers are doing is illegal but they say the hotel is not going to report taxi drivers because that just creates more problems. One time the concierge guy had the audacity to laugh in my face when I told him no one would take me to HK Station. He said arrogantly that there's no chance I'd find any taxi to take me there at that hour (~4pm) and completely dissed me when I was desperate with multiple suitcases and small kids in tow.
On the other hand, Intercontinental bellmen really seem to fight these cab drivers on your behalf.
4pm... well 4:30pm. It's taxi-change-over time when the drivers go back to "base" for the next shift. I used to live by one of these change-over places; it was easy to get a taxi there (and to there at 4:30) but a pain otherwise.

The taxi "world" in Hong Kong is small. The drivers could easily boycott the hotel if it made too many complaints. It sucks, but at least you don't have to deal with it on a regular basis.
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Old Apr 18, 19, 5:52 am
  #68  
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People, AGAIN. Don't you or the bellboy say anything until you get in the cab. Shut the door. Tell the driver where you want to go. If he declines then punch 999 into your phone and ask him if he would like you to hit "Call".

And in 20 years here and, I guess, well over 2000 taxi rides I have had an issue and had to use this tactic maybe twice.

This week I (a big white, non-Cantonese-speaking guy) have taken 6 taxi rides. 3 of them were $24 minimum fare rides, 1 of them not much more (from LKF up to Robinson Road at about 00:30 - no issue). 2 were just shy of $100 (mid-levels to/from Sai Wan Ho). Absolutely no issues at all.

The VAST majority of HK taxi rides are fine, but in this internet age a few noisy complainers with a tiny dataset can create a grossly misleading impression.

The only issue I have with HK taxis is that at certain times and places there simply aren't enough of them.
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Old Apr 18, 19, 6:25 pm
  #69  
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The articles say complaints have grown every year. About 30 a day now.

Obviously a corrupt system and the bureaucrats and politicians don't care because they get driven around in chauffeured cars, according to some of the commenters in the SCMP articles.

Sure with 40,000 drivers and over 18,000 taxis, it's only takes 10% misbehaving drivers, maybe even less, to generate thousands of formal complaints a year and several times as many online complaints.

Clearly the HK govt. politics are anti-competitive. Working HKers express preference for the reliability, transparency and cleanliness of Uber but they're not legally allowed to use Uber. Or rather those Uber drivers are not allowed to operate.

Look at the eTaxi app. that they touted. One innovation is suppose to be being allowed to pay with Octopus cards, another antiquated, anti-competitive system? But presumably not credit cards or mobile wallets. Yes I know HK is not a credit card culture. But that's an excuse.

MTR alone can greatly increase the use of NFC payments in general but for whoever reason, they want to protect Octopus.

Still mobile wallets, led by Apple Pay, are growing in use in HK, even though HK lags behind China and Singapore in adoption:

Despite growing acceptance, mobile and electronic payments services adoption in Hong Kong remains timid when compared with the likes of China and Singapore. One of the main reasons, according to the South China Morning Post, is that the city’s seven million residents rely heavily on the city’s first payments option, the contactless Octopus card.

Launched in 1997, the Octopus card can be used to pay fares on the city’s transport network of buses, ferries and trams, as well as the Mass Transit Railway (MTR). It is also accepted at several merchants as payment for goods and services, including convenience stores and supermarkets. The card system claims to cover 99% of the city’s population.

“Despite the 20 years that Octopus has been used in Hong Kong, it took Apple Pay and its competitors to actually bring mobile payments into the mainstream in the city,” Paul Haswell told the South China Morning Post.

“The number of competing mobile payment platforms in Hong Kong, combined with a reluctance by some parts of society to adopt these systems, means we’re at least five to ten years away from being a cashless city.”
http://fintechnews.hk/8457/mobilepay...ng-kong-study/

Seems like too much inertia or resistance to change, some of which is owing to preserving certain protected business interests. Certainly doesn't accord with the perception of HK as being forged by meritocratic competition.
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Old Apr 18, 19, 8:28 pm
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Originally Posted by DragonSoul View Post
4pm... well 4:30pm. It's taxi-change-over time when the drivers go back to "base" for the next shift. I used to live by one of these change-over places; it was easy to get a taxi there (and to there at 4:30) but a pain otherwise.

The taxi "world" in Hong Kong is small. The drivers could easily boycott the hotel if it made too many complaints. It sucks, but at least you don't have to deal with it on a regular basis.
I realize that 4-5pm is the changeover time. So it's funny that they're still willing to take me if it's HKIA instead of HK Station.
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Old Apr 18, 19, 10:54 pm
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"MTR alone can greatly increase the use of NFC payments in general but for whoever reason, they want to protect Octopus."

"Whatever reason" is probably the fact that MTR/KCR own 79.5 percent of Octopus.

Corporate Structure - Octopus Hong Kong
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Old Apr 18, 19, 11:34 pm
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Oh so self-dealing is a legit reason to protect it from competition?

It’s a marvel that Hong Kong is as prosperous as it is with such granted monopolies.
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Old Apr 18, 19, 11:54 pm
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Octopus has a big bodyguard: the HK Government, which effectively controls it through the MTR/KCR. It's the heavy interest of the government in what should be a competitive commercial environment that is Hong Kong's real shame.
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Old Apr 19, 19, 1:06 am
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Originally Posted by 889 View Post
"MTR alone can greatly increase the use of NFC payments in general but for whoever reason, they want to protect Octopus."

"Whatever reason" is probably the fact that MTR/KCR own 79.5 percent of Octopus.

Corporate Structure - Octopus Hong Kong
But even if MTR has no skin in OCL, acceptance of Apple Pay/Google Pay/Paywave/Contactless will either mean all fares will rise, or pax using Contactless will have to be surcharged.
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Old Apr 19, 19, 1:15 am
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Don’t fares go up anyways?

and the taxi cartels are asking for 20-25% increase in fares?
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