"No Locals" policy

Old Nov 11, 21, 11:22 am
  #46  
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Originally Posted by marconess View Post
Are the hotels being tested on these reasons though? I can't imagine calling a front desk and explaining the situation (house extermination for example) that they wouldn't waive this with appropirate ID?
1. Is that any business of the hotel?
2. If you say extermination, won't the hotel worry that you'll bring some of your home bugs into the hotel in your luggage? Think bedbugs, which can be an expensive problem for a hotel and its reputation.
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Old Nov 11, 21, 4:14 pm
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Originally Posted by MSPeconomist View Post
1. Is that any business of the hotel?
2. If you say extermination, won't the hotel worry that you'll bring some of your home bugs into the hotel in your luggage? Think bedbugs, which can be an expensive problem for a hotel and its reputation.
Agreed on point #2 the same as another poster mentioned calling and admitting that you had COVID. I've had people call and mentioned COVID or bed bugs and that's gets a definitive no to each on staying.
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Old Nov 11, 21, 4:23 pm
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Originally Posted by smmrfld View Post
No, it's not. Those properties that have chosen to implement such a policy have obviously determined that the risks posed by locals (and likely past bad experiences) outweigh local revenue.
Exactly. An LSOP like this is only put in place because of multiple bad past experiences, not because of some rogue new manager trying to flex their muscles.

While I get why people looking from the outside in would think it's BS, when you're on the other side of the desk dealing with drugs, gangs, prostitution, locals looking for a party/hangout spot - there are only so many times you can call the cops, comp other guests or clean up destroyed rooms until you decide to take action. Does that mean that locals who wouldn't engage in this type of behavior get unfairly wrapped up in this? Maybe, but not all money is good money and sometimes it's just not worth the potential aggravation to the staff or other guests.
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Old Nov 12, 21, 2:52 am
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Originally Posted by The Road Goes On Forever View Post
While I get why people looking from the outside in would think it's BS
Erm, yes.

Originally Posted by The Road Goes On Forever View Post
... there are only so many times you can call the cops, comp other guests or clean up destroyed rooms until you decide to take action.
Having to call the cops is a nuisance but, after all, that's what they're there for. Comping other guests and cleaning up damage is a genuine cost, an avoidable one which a good manager would naturally want to minimise. If it happens so often as you suggest, however, the bean-counters should be able to think of a cost-effective solution, without discriminating against a particular subset of citizens. How about something really outside the box, like hiring a security guard?
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Old Nov 12, 21, 3:03 am
  #50  
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It is much cheaper to discriminate against all local residents. Fortunately for hotels that must resort to such measures, doing so is completely legal.
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Old Nov 12, 21, 3:53 am
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Originally Posted by KRUXED View Post
Just encountered a sign at the checkin desk of a Doubletree In the Orlando area. Not accepting reservations from locals within a 50 mile radius at this time
"A Florida hotel..."
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Old Nov 12, 21, 3:58 am
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Originally Posted by The Road Goes On Forever View Post
Exactly. An LSOP like this is only put in place because of multiple bad past experiences, not because of some rogue new manager trying to flex their muscles.

While I get why people looking from the outside in would think it's BS, when you're on the other side of the desk dealing with drugs, gangs, prostitution, locals looking for a party/hangout spot - there are only so many times you can call the cops, comp other guests or clean up destroyed rooms until you decide to take action. Does that mean that locals who wouldn't engage in this type of behavior get unfairly wrapped up in this? Maybe, but not all money is good money and sometimes it's just not worth the potential aggravation to the staff or other guests.
Somehow, requiring a high deposit / pre-authorization for locals as well as banning the actual perpetrators didn't make your (or their) list.

Originally Posted by smmrfld View Post
Good for the properties that are doing this...makes smart business sense. And re the comment above during a disaster...many restrictions are invariably removed or relaxed at the request of local agencies. Not a factor...but even if the bad behavior policy was still in place, so what?
I struggle to figure out how it makes good business sense to refuse service to someone already documented in your system as a frequent stayer with a proven track record of being a non-threat to both your establishment and to the chain at large.

Sounds like one of the stupidest broad-brush decisions anyone could make. But, of course, it can be rationalized to no end.

Last edited by Grog; Nov 12, 21 at 4:35 am
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Old Nov 12, 21, 4:25 am
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Originally Posted by Grog View Post
Somehow, the simple measures of requiring a high deposit/pre-authorization for locals, as well as banning actual perpetrators after-the-fact didn't make your (or their) list.
High deposits might work, but they are more of a problem to genuine guests who aren't frequent travelers than the FT bubble might appreciate. You also have to deal either with attempted chargebacks or stolen cards. I can see why it wouldn't be worth it.

Banning perpetrators after the fact won't work - the room will be registered in someone else's name. If the manager is lucky, that person will actually be staying there. The odds of identifying people who cause disruption but who are not registered, and not arrested after the fact, are slim - and that's before you look into the logistics of maintaining a large list of banned names rather than a minimal one (especially with regard to duplicate names).

That said, Hamptons have a built-in exception via the Honors program. Drugs and prostitution at hotels are unlikely to be compatible with continued membership of the program and if someone is staying in hotels for months of the year, that is a good sign that, despite a local address, they are less likely to cause trouble than an average guest.
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Old Nov 12, 21, 4:58 am
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Originally Posted by Cymro View Post
High deposits might work, but they are more of a problem to genuine guests who aren't frequent travelers than the FT bubble might appreciate. You also have to deal either with attempted chargebacks or stolen cards. I can see why it wouldn't be worth it.

Banning perpetrators after the fact won't work - the room will be registered in someone else's name. If the manager is lucky, that person will actually be staying there. The odds of identifying people who cause disruption but who are not registered, and not arrested after the fact, are slim - and that's before you look into the logistics of maintaining a large list of banned names rather than a minimal one (especially with regard to duplicate names).

That said, Hamptons have a built-in exception via the Honors program. Drugs and prostitution at hotels are unlikely to be compatible with continued membership of the program and if someone is staying in hotels for months of the year, that is a good sign that, despite a local address, they are less likely to cause trouble than an average guest.
If high deposits are a problem to local but genuine guests, imagine the problem that same guest has when they can't even stay at all. It's not a show of mercy to forbid the guest altogether.

Your second paragraph describes the models upon which most major corporations now run. It's easy (especially in the U.S.) to do exactly what you're describing. Heck, it's even being done to us right now as I type this and you read this in terms of tracking/ID. Or one credit check, for Pete's sake.

I get it. Certain managers/executives/owners are too lazy / wealthy / ignorant / you name it to actually look hard at an issue and manage it in the least discriminatory manner possible.
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Old Nov 12, 21, 3:59 pm
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Originally Posted by Grog View Post
Somehow, requiring a high deposit / pre-authorization for locals as well as banning the actual perpetrators didn't make your (or their) list.
Banning of guests definitely happens.

Here's your problem with that: You can ban person X who the room was registered to but the next time they come they just send in person Y or Z or A who took part in the unwanted activities in the past yet because their name wasn't on the room you have no idea. One person comes to check in the room and then ten people enter through a side/back entrance which you can't see (please don't start with the fantasy that hotels have tons of cameras because most don't and if they do a lot of times it's for show - meaning they don't record) and then the problem restarts when they check in with a different person who has no clue about what transpired prior.
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Last edited by The Road Goes On Forever; Nov 12, 21 at 4:26 pm
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Old Nov 12, 21, 4:16 pm
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Originally Posted by henry999 View Post
Having to call the cops is a nuisance but, after all, that's what they're there for. Comping other guests and cleaning up damage is a genuine cost, an avoidable one which a good manager would naturally want to minimise. If it happens so often as you suggest, however, the bean-counters should be able to think of a cost-effective solution, without discriminating against a particular subset of citizens. How about something really outside the box, like hiring a security guard?
The idea of hiring a security guard is by no means an outside box solution but getting your owner/management company to agree to the expense is.
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Old Nov 12, 21, 4:17 pm
  #57  
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Originally Posted by The Road Goes On Forever View Post
Banning of guests definitely happens.

Here's your problem with that: You can ban person X who the room was registered to but the next time they come they just send in person Y or Z or A who took part in the unwanted activities in the past yet because they're name wasn't on the room you have no idea. One person comes to check in the room and then ten people enter through a side/back entrance which you can't see (please don't start with the fantasy that hotels have tons of cameras because most don't and if they do a lot of times it's for show - meaning they don't record) and then the problem restarts when they check in with a different person who has no clue about what transpired a few months prior.
There are jerks everywhere. Same thing applies to folks who trash common spaces like parks and restrooms. Some people just don't care and make it worse for everyone unfortunately.

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Old Nov 12, 21, 4:19 pm
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Originally Posted by Grog View Post
If high deposits are a problem to local but genuine guests, imagine the problem that same guest has when they can't even stay at all. It's not a show of mercy to forbid the guest altogether.

Your second paragraph describes the models upon which most major corporations now run. It's easy (especially in the U.S.) to do exactly what you're describing. Heck, it's even being done to us right now as I type this and you read this in terms of tracking/ID. Or one credit check, for Pete's sake.

I get it. Certain managers/executives/owners are too lazy / wealthy / ignorant / you name it to actually look hard at an issue and manage it in the least discriminatory manner possible.
Sorry but that posters second paragraph is if nothing 100% the truth.
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Old Nov 12, 21, 4:22 pm
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Originally Posted by Cymro View Post
Banning perpetrators after the fact won't work - the room will be registered in someone else's name. If the manager is lucky, that person will actually be staying there. The odds of identifying people who cause disruption but who are not registered, and not arrested after the fact, are slim - and that's before you look into the logistics of maintaining a large list of banned names rather than a minimal one (especially with regard to duplicate names).
Exactly.
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Old Nov 13, 21, 4:48 am
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Originally Posted by The Road Goes On Forever View Post
The idea of hiring a security guard is by no means an outside box solution ...
Sorry ... I guess I forgot the /sarc/ tag. heh heh
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