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Most horrible experience HAMPTON - compensation?

Most horrible experience HAMPTON - compensation?

Old Aug 7, 19, 8:56 pm
  #76  
 
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Originally Posted by indufan View Post
No HOTEL door is supposed to close halfway. Any debating whether a hotel door is designed to shut and lock is freaking pointless. It is designed to do that and it is obvious.
I really don't understand this argument. Lots of doors are able to be opened all the way, part of the way, and closed.
​​​​indeed, if doors slammed all the way shut any time they were opened, someone would inevitably be posting here asking for compensation for the loud sound of doors shutting or the door slamming all the way shut and locking them out when they just opened it a little bit to put out their room service tray
We're either fundamentally misunderstanding each other or you guys are trolling, as I don't understand how you can say no door is designed to stay open.
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Old Aug 8, 19, 1:16 am
  #77  
 
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Originally Posted by ujean View Post

I have no doubt that everybody here without exception would assume that the door was shut correctly because of
  1. The door closes with a lot of force and a loud bam sound the end. There is no gap between the door and the frame and the door and frame are on the same level, there is no "height" difference
  2. The hotel is brand new and a reputable brand
  3. The doors have the newest iteration of locks which can be opened by a digital key on your Hilton app.
.
I want to clarify here, if you latch the deadbolt, the digital key will not work to open the door. It will red light/orange light or simply not respond.

And of course if you do the physical latch and not deadbold, the digital key will open the door but they won't get in very easily due to the physical latch stopping the door from opening more than a few centimeters...
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Old Aug 8, 19, 1:22 am
  #78  
 
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Originally Posted by strickerj View Post


With all due respect, this is exactly the sort of attitude that leads newbies not to come back here. There’s really no need to be so condescending about it. Yes, of course the OP will check now, but that doesn’t change the fact that one should reasonably expect a door latch to work properly, and the hotel absolutely should have comped the night without hesitation rather than taking such a cavalier ("we'll get back to you on that") attitude about it, considering the potential consequences here.

Really, I was pretty shocked to see 3 of the first 5 or so replies siding with the hotel and blaming the OP entirely, although I suppose I shouldn’t be.
Sometimes when I mess up, I become angry with myself. And that is exactly my reaction in the situation I described above not noticing the door not closing properly.

Rather than pass the buck and blame the hotel, I checked on the door and saw that it did not automatically shut all the way, and accepted responsibility for my error. The door is a physical object; these get stuck or fail over time (doesn't matter how new or old the hotel is) for one reason or another. I didn't know it as an inexperienced business traveler but a couple years of 90% travel and you learn many lessons of the road and I suppose it was better to lose one suitcase early in my travel years it is to have this error at age 40 and lose your suitcase, your wife's suitcase, and whatever stuff you brought for your kids.

So yes I am a little bit curious here with OP playing the victim card and not accepting responsibility for not noticing the issue. Also arguing about when to use the deadbolt in the future. Seriously after this incident that should not even be brought up- always use it period no ifs ans or buts.
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Old Aug 8, 19, 3:44 am
  #79  
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Originally Posted by ujean View Post
Thanks everybody for your comments, I think everything that could have been said was said and gives me some perspective. The topic seems to be divisive.

Small update with additional Infos:

I work in Consulting and in the last 7 years I stayed 50% of the time in hotels. So I have a benchmark of what I can and cannot expect.

I have no doubt that everybody here without exception would assume that the door was shut correctly because of
  1. The door closes with a lot of force and a loud bam sound the end. There is no gap between the door and the frame and the door and frame are on the same level, there is no "height" difference
  2. The hotel is brand new and a reputable brand
  3. The doors have the newest iteration of locks which can be opened by a digital key on your Hilton app.
​​Management acknowledged after ​​​ the incident that the door was faulty. They didn't know before. I don't want to name the property as they assured me that the problem will be rectified and I don't want to damage their reputation until they get back to me with a possible resolution. The hotel and staff are actually nice and despite what happenned I would still recommend it.

Again thanks everybody, I will post an update as to what they will offer to rectify the situation.
Thanks for posting this update. From your description of the door, it sounds like the frame was warped which will prevent the door from fully latching. Management's acknowledgement of the fault is a position step forward. Please let us know how you get on from here.
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Old Aug 8, 19, 4:31 am
  #80  
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The bare bones version:

A near-naked drunk enters the OP's room in the early hours. Even with the clumsiness of a drunk he manages to find the bed in the dark and climbs into it without disturbing the OP.

When the OP finally wakes up, he challenges the (still) inebriated invader, but leaves him alone in his room and goes down to reception to complain.

All a bit odd, but there we are: odd things happen.



Investigation shows he door doesn't close securely without manual intervention.



The next action we are aware of is the OP opening a FT account, using it to ask how much compensation he should ask for.

FT contributors then react as we usually do , by largely ignoring the request (the quantum compensation issue). Concentrating on the steps the OP should have taken to secure his room, and which party was at fault.

=======================

The fault:

A Holiday Inn they told me that self-securing doors were an IHG standard requirement. I don't know if that is the case there, or at Hilton, but it rings true.

If it is the case with Hilton, then it is correct to say the door was not operating correctly: meaning a guest should expect the door to fully close behind him/her. This doesn't absolve the guest from checking, and I reckon most of us do that - not obsessively perhaps, but as a matter of course.

The degree of nonchalance exhibited by the OP with regard to security is a red herring: the hotel seems to have failed in its responsibility to secure rooms.

The compensation:

But no harm was done, the OP feels no ill-will towards the drunk or the hotel, and indeed would recommend the place to us (though, sadly, refuses to reveal its name).

So refunding whatever was paid for the stay seems fair compensation. Goodwill towards a Diamond member might dictate a generous handful of ex gratia points
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Old Aug 8, 19, 5:00 am
  #81  
 
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Originally Posted by IAN-UK View Post
The bare bones version:
Are you being reasonable? On my FlyerTalk? Be gone with you!

Seriously, I'd suggest the correct remedy for OP is somewhere between being fired from his consulting job, with loss of pension rights, and being given a billion trillion Honors points. One or the other.
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Old Aug 8, 19, 5:03 am
  #82  
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Originally Posted by Cymro View Post
Are you being reasonable? On my FlyerTalk? Be gone with you!

Seriously, I'd suggest the correct remedy for OP is somewhere between being fired from his consulting job, with loss of pension rights, and being given a billion trillion Honors points. One or the other.
Get off the bloody fence!!!
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Old Aug 8, 19, 6:54 am
  #83  
 
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Originally Posted by storewanderer View Post
Sometimes when I mess up, I become angry with myself. And that is exactly my reaction in the situation I described above not noticing the door not closing properly.

Rather than pass the buck and blame the hotel, I checked on the door and saw that it did not automatically shut all the way, and accepted responsibility for my error. The door is a physical object; these get stuck or fail over time (doesn't matter how new or old the hotel is) for one reason or another. I didn't know it as an inexperienced business traveler but a couple years of 90% travel and you learn many lessons of the road and I suppose it was better to lose one suitcase early in my travel years it is to have this error at age 40 and lose your suitcase, your wife's suitcase, and whatever stuff you brought for your kids.

So yes I am a little bit curious here with OP playing the victim card and not accepting responsibility for not noticing the issue. Also arguing about when to use the deadbolt in the future. Seriously after this incident that should not even be brought up- always use it period no ifs ans or buts.
This is a straw man argument; no one else is suggesting the OP couldn’t have done anything to prevent the incident or is playing the victim card. But considering Hampton Inn will comp your stay for just about anything, that much isn’t an unreasonable request.
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Old Aug 8, 19, 6:59 am
  #84  
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Originally Posted by storewanderer View Post
Sometimes when I mess up, I become angry with myself. And that is exactly my reaction in the situation I described above not noticing the door not closing properly.

Rather than pass the buck and blame the hotel, I checked on the door and saw that it did not automatically shut all the way, and accepted responsibility for my error. The door is a physical object; these get stuck or fail over time (doesn't matter how new or old the hotel is) for one reason or another. I didn't know it as an inexperienced business traveler but a couple years of 90% travel and you learn many lessons of the road and I suppose it was better to lose one suitcase early in my travel years it is to have this error at age 40 and lose your suitcase, your wife's suitcase, and whatever stuff you brought for your kids.

So yes I am a little bit curious here with OP playing the victim card and not accepting responsibility for not noticing the issue. Also arguing about when to use the deadbolt in the future. Seriously after this incident that should not even be brought up- always use it period no ifs ans or buts.
The brakes on the rental car didn't work, I know it's my fault I haven't checked them before driving off the lot, this is basically the first thing they teach you in drivers Ed. So I accepted responsibility for the following crash and the rental company is not at fault.

[Content removed by moderator] for suggesting I am playing the victim card
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Last edited by Canarsie; Aug 8, 19 at 11:37 am Reason: Bypass of the profanity filter is not permitted on FlyerTalk.
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Old Aug 8, 19, 10:16 am
  #85  
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Originally Posted by ujean View Post
... I use the deadbolt only to make sure that cleaning does not come in unexpected[ly] if I stay longer than until early morning in the hotel.....
This thread is certainly a warning that this may not be best practices.
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Old Aug 8, 19, 2:28 pm
  #86  
 
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Originally Posted by IAN-UK View Post
The bare bones version:

A near-naked drunk enters the OP's room in the early hours. Even with the clumsiness of a drunk he manages to find the bed in the dark and climbs into it without disturbing the OP.

When the OP finally wakes up, he challenges the (still) inebriated invader, but leaves him alone in his room and goes down to reception to complain.

All a bit odd, but there we are: odd things happen.



Investigation shows he door doesn't close securely without manual intervention.



The next action we are aware of is the OP opening a FT account, using it to ask how much compensation he should ask for.

FT contributors then react as we usually do , by largely ignoring the request (the quantum compensation issue). Concentrating on the steps the OP should have taken to secure his room, and which party was at fault.

=======================

The fault:

A Holiday Inn they told me that self-securing doors were an IHG standard requirement. I don't know if that is the case there, or at Hilton, but it rings true.

If it is the case with Hilton, then it is correct to say the door was not operating correctly: meaning a guest should expect the door to fully close behind him/her. This doesn't absolve the guest from checking, and I reckon most of us do that - not obsessively perhaps, but as a matter of course.

The degree of nonchalance exhibited by the OP with regard to security is a red herring: the hotel seems to have failed in its responsibility to secure rooms.

The compensation:

But no harm was done, the OP feels no ill-will towards the drunk or the hotel, and indeed would recommend the place to us (though, sadly, refuses to reveal its name).

So refunding whatever was paid for the stay seems fair compensation. Goodwill towards a Diamond member might dictate a generous handful of ex gratia points
I would have said it more succinctly (not saying the longer reply is bad - don't hate me), but the bare bones version seems spot-on to me. Refund of room charges, some gifting of points or free nights (same thing essentially) and it's done.
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Old Aug 8, 19, 3:44 pm
  #87  
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Originally Posted by Adam1222 View Post
I really don't understand this argument. Lots of doors are able to be opened all the way, part of the way, and closed.
​​​​indeed, if doors slammed all the way shut any time they were opened, someone would inevitably be posting here asking for compensation for the loud sound of doors shutting or the door slamming all the way shut and locking them out when they just opened it a little bit to put out their room service tray
We're either fundamentally misunderstanding each other or you guys are trolling, as I don't understand how you can say no door is designed to stay open.
​​​​​​No, I am not trolling at all. We are talking a hotel room entrance door. NOT all doors. Not the bathroom door, not the front door at my house. I will assume you have stayed in a hotel room. Sure there have been that have been broke over the years but when you release the door it springs shut. And then locks. Do I need to post a video of the Hampton I am in right now? I have been in a few MOTELS that didn't do this but that is because they were like 50-year-old Holiday Inns. And yes, these doors do ROUTINELY slam shut.
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Old Aug 8, 19, 5:18 pm
  #88  
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I’m a little tougher than my fellow moderators i. deleting snarky comments – the OP posted a legitimate problem and to be honest, many people join flyer talk For exactly that reason. Whether you feel their ideal compensation was appropriate or not, personal comments and attacks are never allowed on FT.
Thanks.

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Old Aug 8, 19, 6:55 pm
  #89  
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Seriously....

If the personal comments continue the thread will have to be closed. Thanks for your cooperation.

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Old Aug 8, 19, 9:30 pm
  #90  
 
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Originally Posted by ujean View Post
The brakes on the rental car didn't work, I know it's my fault I haven't checked them before driving off the lot, this is basically the first thing they teach you in drivers Ed. So I accepted responsibility for the following crash and the rental company is not at fault.

[Content removed by moderator] for suggesting I am playing the victim card
Somehow the brakes worked to make the rental car come to a stop in the parking space at the rental car pick up area. But yes it could potentially break mid-rental. A rental car accident may cause damaged property and personal injury which are measurable damages, so that is a bit different than this situation which had no measurable damage only emotional.

I hope you at least understand my central comment here: Use the deadbolt at all times when in the room. It doesn't matter if you are at the $35 a night Motel 6 in a bad neighborhood or at the $1,500 a night Conrad in the Maldives.

You may think it is a joke. Motel 6 puts a sticker on the door that says to engage deadbolt at all times when in the room. When I was 18 and first stayed alone at a Motel 6 and noticed that sticker I laughed and thought it was a joke. I didn't latch the deadbolt. Then I took a walk through the Motel 6 parking lot at 10 PM and found people loitering, drinking, smoking. I went back to the room and followed the instructions on the sticker. I also realized if all I can afford is Motel 6, I need to reconsider my travel plans back then.
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