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Mandatory Wellness/Security Check: Hilton Corporate Policy?

Mandatory Wellness/Security Check: Hilton Corporate Policy?

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Old Feb 16, 19, 1:37 am
  #16  
 
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Originally Posted by observer View Post
The property is the Hilton La Jolla Torrey Pines (San Diego).

This unannounced wellness inspection occurred on the evening (Thursday) of the second day of my stay (I checked in on Tuesday evening).. In fact, I had not only charged lunch to my account several hours before the check, but I had also interacted with the housekeeper on Wednesday and Thursday mornings to get some more water and coffee.

Interestingly, this property does not have “Do Not Disturb” or “Privacy Please” cards to hang on the door. Instead, the sign encourages taking a pass on housekeeping. The sign says “No Service Needed Today.”

I had a very unsatisfactory conversation with the manager on duty (Michael?). When I mentioned that I had just come from another Hilton property and had gone consecutive days without housekeeping and with no intrusive security check, he seemed alarmed, said I would have to tell him the name of the property, and that he would have to report this dire matter to corporate.
Personally, I would not stay at a property again where the "security guard" came to my door unannounced with this sort of power trip attitude flashing the badge. I also would not open the front door but call the front desk asking why someone has been sent to my room unannounced. What if you had been sleeping or resting? It should start with a phone contact from management (perhaps housekeeping) asking if you need anything. I wonder if Hilton La Jolla Torrey Pines is a corporate operated Hilton. You'd think they would have learned about having "security guards" throw their weight around after that DoubleTree Portland incident.

Can you talk to someone above the "manager on duty?"

I am sure they have their reasons for this policy but I don't like the execution of the policy. Also they should probably disclose this policy after day one of refused housekeeping.
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Old Feb 16, 19, 5:53 am
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I have a friend who works at one of the Hilton's in Vegas. I asked him what they do. He stated that if housekeeping has not been in the room to service it after 2 days (due to a DND on the door) then the MOD, along with security will go the room. If they knock and no one answers they will go into the room to make sure everything is OK. A letter will be left for the guest on the bed/table. If the guest is in the room and presents themselves to the MOD then all good, they do not enter the room.

My mate also said that one of the big 5* hotels will still go into the room, even if the guest is at the door (obviously they explain that they want to come in and check the room).

I can see why properties in Vegas would do this.
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Old Feb 16, 19, 9:42 am
  #18  
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Originally Posted by hugolover View Post

What a bizarre hotel policy not to check on a guest who hasn't been seen around the hotel for days and is checked in, never seen going from his/her room, nothing on the camera, no housekeeping, no key lock entry recorded. How many guests generally don't leave their room at all for 48 hours? Who have never been seen by staff, ordering items? It must be a handful occurrence in any property, worldwide.

Could something be wrong with that guest? Would a courtesy call not be sensible? Would it not save a lot of hassle in the long run? It's not all about defeating terrorists, but the well-being of guests.
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For the record, and not to challenge anything you said, the background to my rude security inspection at the Hilton La Jolla Torrey Pines was quite different. I had interacted with the housekeeper both days, getting water and coffee. There were multiple key lock entries — one as recent as a few hours before I was ordered to present myself at the door. I had charged a restaurant meal to my room a few hours earlier.

The manager on duty made clear by his repeated references to Las Vegas as the motivation for the practice that terrorism and not the welfare of guests was behind the practice.
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Old Feb 16, 19, 10:11 am
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OP, if you consider this to be a “very upsetting intrusion”, you may wish to either re-set your expectations regarding stuff that can happen when you travel or take your dollars somewhere else. Their policy has been communicated to you. Accept it or move on. Entirely unclear if you’re more upset about the perceived injustice of them checking on the room or your encounter with the manager. As with most stories like this, I’d love to hear the other side.
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Old Feb 16, 19, 4:54 pm
  #20  
 
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Originally Posted by hugolover View Post
The policy came about due to the Vegas shooting in October 2017-isn't that obvious, its been referred to over and over in previous posts, so why would it have been happening for "decades" as you said? Nobody said it was. The policy is a little over a year old.
No, it wasn't obvious. While the OP mentioned Las Vegas, you didn't. So, I'm not sure why you expected people to know that was the reason for this policy.

Originally Posted by hugolover View Post
I never said they need to "enter a room" to check on a guest.
Then what's the point? If this is related to terrorism, what benefit does this provide the hotel. COMMON SENSE says that it's utterly useless if you don't enter the room to see the stockpile of weapons.

Originally Posted by hugolover View Post
What a bizarre hotel policy not to check on a guest who hasn't been seen around the hotel for days and is checked in, never seen going from his/her room, nothing on the camera, no housekeeping, no key lock entry recorded. How many guests generally don't leave their room at all for 48 hours? Who have never been seen by staff, ordering items? It must be a handful occurrence in any property, worldwide.
As noted by observer, she or he did interact with the staff but was still hassled.

Originally Posted by hugolover View Post
Could something be wrong with that guest? Would a courtesy call not be sensible? Would it not save a lot of hassle in the long run? It's not all about defeating terrorists, but the well-being of guests.

To me, it makes a lot of sense and I'd imagine many properties never need to intervene, or at a maximum a few times a year.
As I mentioned, I spent over a decade working in hotels, mostly at one hotel. For simplicity sake, that's say I worked there for 10 years.

10 years x 365 days/per x 360 rooms in that hotel x a conservative 80% occupancy = 1,051,200 occupied room nights

While we had our share of medical incidents, we never once had an incapacitated guest. Not once in over 1 million room nights. Additionally, I never heard of that happening at any of the 8 other hotels that were within walking distance of our hotel. (Trust me, that's the sort of news that would get shared in the hotel community.)

This is a solution in search of a problem.

Originally Posted by hugolover View Post
As I said COMMON SENSE is the prevailing mentality. Not hysterics, as you seem to be suggesting.
I don't believe it's hysterical to expect to have some privacy when renting a hotel room. Nor is it hysterical to balk at the notion that I need to physically present myself to a hotel staff on a daily basis. I'm an adult. Most adults don't need their hotel to act as a nanny.

Finally, I noticed that you didn't provide a source for your claim. So, I'll ask again: What's your source for this "no opt-out" policy?
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Old Feb 16, 19, 5:11 pm
  #21  
 
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I didn't make the policy. Hilton did. Is it reactionary-after the horse has vaulted-yes, but that's American firms all over isn't it? Would it have made any difference to the shooting, probably not.

As for the source, ask your no-doubt numerous hotel contacts to obtain information because I am unable to provide it on a public forum.

Hilton are pushing a human trafficking training for staff. Does that need a new franchise agreement? Well obviously, no!

And incidentally as you surely know, changing the brand standards does not require a new agreement either. They are changed all the time. As I am sure you are aware. It does not require the consent of the hotel if they switch toiletries, alarm clock brands, or an extra type of fruit on the breakfast buffet.
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Old Feb 17, 19, 12:35 am
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So, no source.

That means there's no reason to discuss it further. I'm not about to expend any energy contacted people in the industry. I'm not the one making the claim that there's a global policy requiring daily checks on every guest in every Hilton hotel. I've said what I needed to say. If anyone has further questions about how welfare checks work in well-run hotels, feel free to send me a message. I won't be returning to this thread to argue this further.
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Old Feb 17, 19, 8:09 am
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It’s not daily.

Have a lovely Sunday.
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Old Feb 17, 19, 8:49 am
  #24  
 
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Here is an older thread on this: Some Hiltons may require housekeeping entry after 24 hours
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Old Feb 17, 19, 9:17 am
  #25  
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Originally Posted by smmrfld View Post
OP, if you consider this to be a “very upsetting intrusion”, you may wish to either re-set your expectations regarding stuff that can happen when you travel or take your dollars somewhere else. Their policy has been communicated to you. Accept it or move on. Entirely unclear if you’re more upset about the perceived injustice of them checking on the room or your encounter with the manager. As with most stories like this, I’d love to hear the other side.
First, I want to apologize for the thread title. I tried to edit it both to remove the word “daily” (I was not told this would happen each day — for me the inspection occurred on my second day with limited housekeeping service) and to correct the spelling of “corporate.” I could not figure out a way to edit my thread title. Sorry.

Second, to respond to the above:

I fully intend to take my dollars elsewhere and I will not be returning to the La Jolla Torrey Shores. I will be returning to the area next month and have already booked for a nearby property.

I think my expectations regarding stuff that can happen in travel are set properly. I have travelled for decades — including lots of business travel in less developed countries where one learns appriopriate cautions in hotels (such as not opening door for unexpected persons claiming to be security.). I have elite (in some cases the very top and lifetime) status in airline and hotel programs. I deliberately to not include such self-aggrandizing information on my FT signature. This is not my first time around the hotel/travel block,

I still am unaware of the “policy” of this hotel or Hilton corporate. I have written about this matter to corporate, but have not yet received a response. All I know is that the manager on duty told me that all Hiltons were required to conduct inspections after Las Vegas. He did not say how often, whether the guest should be alerted by a notice or call from front desk, etc. Perhaps corporate can respond here on FT and provide “the other side of the story.” I would welcome that.

There is no “perceived injustice” on my part regarding their checking on the room or a guest. It’s not the practice to which I object but, rather, the way it was carried out — without any prior notice of the practice, without the simple courtesy of a call from the front desk saying Security was on its way for a brief visual inspection — with unanticipated pounding on the door from a voice purporting to be that of Security demanding that I open the door.

Finally, it is in fact the case that the dismissive response of the manager on duty — including his demand (not request) that I give him the name of the property at which I had stayed immediately prior to checking in at Torrey Pines so that he could report them to corporate — aggravated the situation for me. The manager on duty (Michael?) could have apologized for the lack of notice, said that he was sorry I was upset, said that he understood my concern, that he would raise with your fellow managers the suggestion that such inspections be preceded by a call from the front desk, etc., etc.
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Old Feb 17, 19, 9:59 am
  #26  
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Originally Posted by username View Post
Thank you. An interesting thread, esp. the Gary Leff article quoting Hilton corporate materials.

The La Jolla Torrey Pines property has no printed in-room Guest Services Directory with tabs. Instead they refer guests to some TV material (with tabs).

I could find no reference on the TV material to this policy/practice. There is a section on safety on the TV. It speaks mostly of what to do in case of fire/earthquake. It says nothing about exercising caution in opening the door for unexpected persons. Nor about the possibility of inspections if one does not receive housekeeping service.

Similarly, I received no card under my door regarding the inability to service my room and/or the possibility that my room would thus be inspected.

It may be that the corporate policies described in the Leff piece are no longer in place ~18 months later. If they are, it is curious that the La Jolla Torrey Pines, whose manager on duty was so eager to report to corporate regarding my previous Hilton stay, is itself non-compliant in this matter.
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Old Feb 17, 19, 2:29 pm
  #27  
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Originally Posted by observer View Post
First, I want to apologize for the thread title. I tried to edit it both to remove the word “daily” (I was not told this would happen each day — for me the inspection occurred on my second day with limited housekeeping service) and to correct the spelling of “corporate.” I could not figure out a way to edit my thread title.
Simply go back the first post, select the red triangle "alert moderator" button and tell them how you want the thread title modified.

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Old Feb 17, 19, 5:04 pm
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Shock horror, there has been a policy since 2017 and it was already public on the blogs since then? I am SHOCKED... .

A few thoughts. They have to buy the cards for under the door, that costs $. And many of them are too cheap. Just like the "no service" or "DND" signs. Heck, Hilton have properties which don't buy any of the Sysco toiletries and do nothing about it. So I presume they're fine with the franchise lottery of those who respect the Brand Standard to the letter and those who have a more Benghazi recall of it.

There's no card to say we are about to inspect your room for bombs. And as its pointed out, it's not an inspection, you just need to answer the door.

One thing that writerguyfl chap points out that is 100% bang on, is how it will probably make no difference at all to terror attack, but that's obvious isn't it?

To hopefully bring this to a close, if this policy is carrier out properly, the vast majority of guest don't even notice. The manager was just a bit overzealous in this particular case.
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Old Feb 17, 19, 8:28 pm
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Originally Posted by DELee View Post
Simply go back the first post, select the red triangle "alert moderator" button and tell them how you want the thread title modified.

David
Thanks very much. I have never had occasion to use that button. I assumed it was to be used only to alert the moderator to inappropriate content, In any case, I have requested that the thread title be modified.
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