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Tip jars at Hampton Inn breakfast

Tip jars at Hampton Inn breakfast

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Old Feb 13, 19, 5:56 pm
  #16  
 
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Originally Posted by hugolover View Post
I'm quite confident tip envelopes are prohibited by the brand standard, so I'd imagine that tip jars would be too.
Huh you're right - the brand standard I found with a quick google search states "The solicitation of tips by any employee is prohibited. Examples include tip jars in the breakfast area, in-room housekeeping envelopes, etc." (303.02)

I don't care really one way or another; it's just interesting to see such an in-depth document.
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Old Feb 14, 19, 5:37 am
  #17  
 
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I see no problem with those who choose not to leave a tip. What saddens me is the cold-hearted tone of some posters.
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Old Feb 14, 19, 10:30 am
  #18  
 
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Originally Posted by pinniped View Post
...tipping is tacky and ultimately bad for the employees in that employers will eventually use it as a tool to try to depress their own financial responsibility for acquiring the talent they need to run their business.
Are you speaking of ANY tipping, whatever the context? Whatever the merits of tip-based compensation, if you don't tip when it's customary to do so you're not helping the employee. That IS 'tacky.'
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Old Feb 14, 19, 10:38 am
  #19  
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Originally Posted by trouble747 View Post
Are you speaking of ANY tipping, whatever the context? Whatever the merits of tip-based compensation, if you don't tip when it's customary to do so you're not helping the employee. That IS 'tacky.'
It is *not* customary to tip at a Hampton Inn. I oppose any steps taken to attempt to make people believe it is customary or feel guilty about not engaging in this scourge.

More broadly speaking, I believe it's a terrible economic model and should be driven out of society wherever possible. It leaves workers vulnerable and excuses corporations from fulfilling their responsibility to pay fair market wages for their talent. I get why it was used long ago with servants but I wish we as a people had moved beyond this kind of thinking. (Clearly we have not.)

That said, I don't engage in unusual tipping where it is customary, such as a U.S. restaurant. I just try to follow local custom wherever I am, even if I don't agree with the custom.
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Old Feb 14, 19, 10:46 am
  #20  
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It is fine to believe that reliance on tips to make up for sub-standard wages is a poor economic model.

But, that does not change the reality of the situation today.

Here in the US. tipping for food service is the norm and one can rationalize different levels of tipping in many different ways, e.g. self-serve freeibie vs. fine-dining with a captain, water, and assistant all doting. But, leaving a tip jar is the least worst way to handle the situation because people who are not already paying won't tip without being jogged. Those who don't wish to tip should simply not tip.
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Old Feb 14, 19, 10:50 am
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Originally Posted by pinniped View Post
It is *not* customary to tip at a Hampton Inn. I oppose any steps taken to attempt to make people believe it is customary or feel guilty about not engaging in this scourge.
I agree that it is not customary.

More broadly speaking, I believe it's a terrible economic model and should be driven out of society wherever possible. It leaves workers vulnerable and excuses corporations from fulfilling their responsibility to pay fair market wages for their talent. I get why it was used long ago with servants but I wish we as a people had moved beyond this kind of thinking. (Clearly we have not.)

That said, I don't engage in unusual tipping where it is customary, such as a U.S. restaurant. I just try to follow local custom wherever I am, even if I don't agree with the custom.
Some efforts have been made on this point (while absolutely a minority, I know of establishments in the US that pay their FOH employees a full hourly wage and prohibit tipping). But I don't believe that individuals choosing to opt out--when tipping IS customary--does anything but harm the service employee. (And I feel like on our recent trips to western Europe we just saw a lot of compulsory 'service charges' on restaurant bills. Is this a superior system?)
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Old Feb 14, 19, 11:26 am
  #22  
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Originally Posted by trouble747 View Post
(And I feel like on our recent trips to western Europe we just saw a lot of compulsory 'service charges' on restaurant bills. Is this a superior system?)
The most honest and ethical system would be for the restaurant to pay its people what the market commands (abiding by all local employment laws) and charge diners an appropriate amount for the food. All this junk like tipping, bogus fees, etc. is just a shell game.

In the U.S., I'd be happy to see the purchasing power of the minimum wage raised at the Federal level, no exceptions for tipped employees, and then indexed to inflation so it adjusts every year. Then high-cost states and cities could choose to raise it beyond that, but they would not be permitted to undercut the Federal law because of an archaic tipping custom.
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Old Feb 14, 19, 1:16 pm
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Originally Posted by craigthemif View Post
I'd happily pay a room rate commensurate with paying a living wage to all hotel employees.
Cool...remind me to raise your room rate about $200/night for your next stay at my property
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Old Feb 14, 19, 1:26 pm
  #24  
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Originally Posted by hotelboy View Post
Cool...remind me to raise your room rate about $200/night for your next stay at my property
So your hotel is currently skirting a bunch of employment laws right now? To fully comply you'd need to charge $200 additional per room per night?

I call BS.
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Old Feb 14, 19, 9:07 pm
  #25  
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There’s little bit of thread drift here

The question is whether Hamptons or other Hilton hotels should or are allowed to leave a tip jars out. Drifting to complain about tipping in general, the virtues versus problems of tipping etc. are not appropriate for this thread. Thanks.

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Old Feb 15, 19, 9:46 am
  #26  
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I saw it once at a Homewood breakfast. When I mentioned my unhappiness, the manager I spoke with replied, "I guess that must be left over from an evening reception."
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Old Feb 15, 19, 10:03 am
  #27  
 
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I've been to at least two Embassy Suites - one in Chicago, another in South Carolina - where the cook (chef?) making the made-to-order eggs/pancakes was freely accepting tips left on top of the counter in front of his griddle.
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Old Feb 15, 19, 10:09 am
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Almost every Embassy Suites I’ve visited has a tip jar or plate for the cooked-to-order staff; this has been the case for decades.
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Old Feb 15, 19, 1:54 pm
  #29  
 
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I've never seen it at a Hampton, but that seems rational giving there's no "personalized" service aspect at breakfast. However, it does appear to be the norm at other properties - generally when there are cooked-to-order eggs on offer. The omelette chef usually has a tip jar/bowl on the counter.
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Old Feb 15, 19, 3:55 pm
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Interesting reports. Another consistent brand standard then!
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