Go Back  FlyerTalk Forums > Destinations > Europe > Germany
Reload this Page >

Getting German citizenship/passport

Getting German citizenship/passport

Old Mar 13, 12, 2:54 pm
  #91  
FlyerTalk Evangelist
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: DUS (and somewhere in transit)
Programs: LH SEN, AB PLAT, BA Gold, Hilton Lifetime Diamond, SPG Lifetime Platinum, IHG RA, Hyatt Globalist
Posts: 10,038
Originally Posted by mglunk View Post
Flying Lawyer,
Do you specialize in German Citizenship law or know someone who does? I of course have googled some, but its always nice to get a reference.
Thanks!
Neither nor, sorry
Flying Lawyer is offline  
Old May 8, 12, 12:46 am
  #92  
 
Join Date: May 2012
Posts: 3
Ethnic German

This question would be for Aviatrix and Flying Lawyer or anybody else who could help

I'm an ethnic German from Brazil and researched a lot of my genealogy.
Thing is, technically I have the right to claim the Citizenship accordingly to German Embassy because my mother is daughter from unmarried grandmother.

The big problem is, they moved from Volhynia/Russia (today Ukraine). I can't find the birth certificate of my great-grandfather, born in 1860 in Poland because the documents have been destroyed by the wars in that town, I confirmed many times.

Is there any way I could prove I'm German?
My case is as difficult as Chris Kaman and he got it. Yeah I know he's famous but... I keep hoping. It worths a read on this article: (http://www.worldpoliticsreview.com/a...an-nationality)

Any sugestions?

Cheers
triad is offline  
Old May 10, 12, 12:26 am
  #93  
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Posts: 1,305
It is possible to have a German citizen accompany you to your interview, if that person can attest or give proof of your claim. But without some form of documentation that can be verified it would be most difficult, even more so since the events in Dubai.

Chris Kaman's quasi-status of Volkszugehörigkeit, may stem from his being Volkdeutche, but it had to have been verified some amount of abstammung documentation provided to the authorities for review. A strong consideration might be if one or any of your relatives resided in Germany, or any of the then occupied territories, which could be verified by a living person currently residing in Germany.

Being a long time Residente Permanente do Brasil, I would think that being a citizen of Brasil would be quite a value to you. Given Brasil's strong currency, recent growth, and economic future, there are many here in Europe envious to have your current citizenship and the benefits that go with it.
Swissaire is offline  
Old May 10, 12, 4:56 pm
  #94  
 
Join Date: May 2012
Posts: 3
Originally Posted by Swissaire View Post
It is possible to have a German citizen accompany you to your interview, if that person can attest or give proof of your claim. But without some form of documentation that can be verified it would be most difficult, even more so since the events in Dubai.

Chris Kaman's quasi-status of Volkszugehörigkeit, may stem from his being Volkdeutche, but it had to have been verified some amount of abstammung documentation provided to the authorities for review. A strong consideration might be if one or any of your relatives resided in Germany, or any of the then occupied territories, which could be verified by a living person currently residing in Germany.

Being a long time Residente Permanente do Brasil, I would think that being a citizen of Brasil would be quite a value to you. Given Brasil's strong currency, recent growth, and economic future, there are many here in Europe envious to have your current citizenship and the benefits that go with it.
I'm not aware about the Dubai events. What was that?

In my case I should be able to have dual citizenship though, so I won't lose my Brazilian one. I love Brazil, but I also love my German heritage, it's not to do with living there or not. I'm Residente Permanente in New Zealand and I'm quite happy, but I never know for how long I'll stay here.

If relatives lived in Germany would be 3 degree cousins that I'm not aware of. I want to keep digging.
triad is offline  
Old May 10, 12, 8:39 pm
  #95  
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Posts: 1,305
The Dubai incident involved ( among other things ) a person obtaining a German passport under fraudulent circumstances, including a German national appearing to attest as a witness for the citizenship claim. The residence address was not checked, and that individual was granted the German passport. A serious crime was then committed in Dubai using that passport to enter and exit the country.

Much later, that person was later apprehended in Europe, and released after sometime in custody, sans passport. As a result the German authorities are looking to prevent this from happeneing again by detailing much more over citizenship applications. You can read more about the incident if you poke around on Der Spiegel online.

I have friends and relatives in Brasil that are also looking into the possibility of dual citizenship. It seems to be a recent trend in the last three years , especially in the Mercosul.

Keep in mind that one significant factor evaluated by most consulates from Europe is how the applicant is involved with that nation culturally ( ties ) and historically, via clubs or friendship organizations. You may wish to look into the benefits of such a membership, if you haven't already.
Swissaire is offline  
Old May 11, 12, 2:09 am
  #96  
 
Join Date: May 2012
Posts: 3
Originally Posted by Swissaire View Post
The Dubai incident involved ( among other things ) a person obtaining a German passport under fraudulent circumstances, including a German national appearing to attest as a witness for the citizenship claim. The residence address was not checked, and that individual was granted the German passport. A serious crime was then committed in Dubai using that passport to enter and exit the country.

Much later, that person was later apprehended in Europe, and released after sometime in custody, sans passport. As a result the German authorities are looking to prevent this from happeneing again by detailing much more over citizenship applications. You can read more about the incident if you poke around on Der Spiegel online.

I have friends and relatives in Brasil that are also looking into the possibility of dual citizenship. It seems to be a recent trend in the last three years , especially in the Mercosul.

Keep in mind that one significant factor evaluated by most consulates from Europe is how the applicant is involved with that nation culturally ( ties ) and historically, via clubs or friendship organizations. You may wish to look into the benefits of such a membership, if you haven't already.
Thanks for your comments Swissaire.
I'm a member of the http://www.sggee.org/ but do you think it would make a difference?
I'm culturaly tied to Germany althought I never lived there before (just visited). I like the German culture in Brazil and I know many people who still speaking German in Brazil as a first language.
triad is offline  
Old May 11, 12, 2:18 pm
  #97  
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Posts: 1,305
Yes, it helps.

Document your membership and state how it helps you to maintain your cultural ties to Germany. A small start no doubt, but it all adds up when your claim is reviewed.

Further, take the time to speak perhaps with a translator to the German-speaking residents you know, if possible. If they are agreeable and how you approach them, you might consider writing a history for each as a cultural history project. I think of all my relatives, and others I have met along the way who had rich and interesting experiences.

Years ago I met a German living in Chile who had jumped from a clipper whaling ship anchored there. He had married, had a large family, and was almost 100 years of age ! Much later I thought later his life would make a good book to read.

Often these histories are not recorded, people get too busy, and thus rich experiences are lost.

Ultimately, I think you do need to consult a qualified and credentialed lawyer with a speciality and experience in German citizenship law, but the project above might be another good component to add to your claim documentation.
Swissaire is offline  
Old Oct 26, 12, 2:45 pm
  #98  
 
Join Date: Oct 2012
Posts: 2
So I know this is reviving an old topic, but I was wondering if anyone here has any ideas (and perhaps this may help others):

My great-grandfather was a german citizen (born 1886) who moved to the US.
My grandfather (his son) was born (1921) BEFORE my great-grandfather became naturalized as a US citizen, so he was still a german citizen at birth.

However, and this is the point of confusion, my grandfather signed up for ROTC in WWII (voluntarily, although the war was compulsory(?)).

Does that mean he gave up his german citizenship then?

And moreover, am I no longer considered a german citizen? I.e., my application for a certificate of citizenship would likely be denied?

I know a lot of this relies on very complicated (and often dated) laws, but any knowledge is appreciated.
Itsn is offline  
Old Oct 29, 12, 6:34 am
  #99  
Moderator: Lufthansa Miles & More, External Miles & Points Resources
 
Join Date: Dec 2002
Location: MUC
Programs: LH SEN
Posts: 37,790
I would apply nevertheless and see what they say.
oliver2002 is offline  
Old Oct 30, 12, 9:12 am
  #100  
 
Join Date: Oct 2012
Posts: 2
Originally Posted by oliver2002 View Post
I would apply nevertheless and see what they say.
True; I might as well. Encouraging words! Thanks for the reply.
Itsn is offline  
Old Dec 16, 17, 10:19 am
  #101  
 
Join Date: Dec 2017
Posts: 1
Anyone succeed?

hi all.
I’m an American living in Europe. Was told through a basic consultation with lawyer I qualify for German citizenship. Here’s the rundown:
G-grandfather born 1910 in Dresden. Arrived Ellis Island in 1923. Got married.
Grandpa born 1935.
G-grandpa naturalized as US citizen 1939 (after grandpa was born, 4yrs old).
Gramdpa served as reservist in national guard in 50s. No fighting.
Grandpa fathered my Mother 1963
I was born, with G-grandfather’s German last name to my mother, out of wedlock, 1982.

Lawyer said never ever had an issue with reservist military and some law came into effect in 1999-2000 stating any person joining foreign military renounces German nationality, but grandpa was a reservist prior to this law.

Anyone who posted successfully acquire German citizenship?

As I mentioned, I’m currently living in Europe and this would help me and my daughter immensely. Advice welcome. Many thanks!
LeeBomb is offline  

Thread Tools
Search this Thread
Search Engine: