Guy Savoy---worth it?

Old Apr 11, 05, 8:37 pm
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Guy Savoy---worth it?

Friends want me to join them for dinner at Guy Savoy (the ***Michelin one). I will be paying my own way.

Do you think it is that special? I would probably order the menu rather than a la carte, and I am guessing that it would cost approx. $300.
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Old Apr 11, 05, 10:25 pm
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Originally Posted by Dorlee
I am guessing that it would cost approx. $300.
You are correct.

http://www.guysavoy.com/fr
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Old Apr 12, 05, 7:34 am
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Originally Posted by Dorlee
Friends want me to join them for dinner at Guy Savoy (the ***Michelin one). I will be paying my own way.

Do you think it is that special? I would probably order the menu rather than a la carte, and I am guessing that it would cost approx. $300.

If you have to ask, it will not be worth it to you
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Old Apr 12, 05, 11:50 pm
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USD 300 is the rock bottom minimum (for their cheapest set menu with no wine or extras -- however that is a very lavish meal so no extras are required). Is it worth it? Absolutely. I would skip lunch for a month in order to eat there (or the French Laundry in California, or Le Bernardin in NYC, or maybe a dozen restaurants in the world). Thus: special, a worthy experience, a must if you love food, but not unique and not the only chance of a lifetime.
An interesting aside: these meals are actually good value compared to lesser great restaurants (the 1-star level for example). The price is not proportionately greater with the quality and even cost of production (many 3-star restaurants lose money on the restaurant operation, it is the rest of the chef's ventures that subsidize the 3-star restaurant -- hard to think of a $300 meal as being priced below cost, but that is often the case!
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Old Apr 12, 05, 11:59 pm
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I don't love Guy Savoy but I do love this website:
http://www.dininginfrance.com/paris_restaurants.htm
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Old Apr 13, 05, 10:43 am
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Originally Posted by obscure2k
I don't love Guy Savoy but I do love this website:
http://www.dininginfrance.com/paris_restaurants.htm
Thanks for the web site, o2k . Is there a particular reason you don't like Guy Savoy? Which *** restaurant would you choose instead?

I wanted to go to back to Taillevent, but my friends said we've been before, so let's try something new.
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Old Apr 13, 05, 7:43 pm
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I would choose Lucas Carton over Guy Savoy, but the best are not in Paris. However every single 3 star is somewhere between excellent and sublime; a few are a bit overboard on the flavours and composition, though less so this year. While many unrated restaurants are just as good (even superb) and invariably much cheaper, it is still a useful guide and worth considering. I happen to think it is cost effective, if you have enough of a yearly budget for restaurant dining as an event or as entertainment.
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Old Apr 13, 05, 8:01 pm
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Originally Posted by Dorlee
Thanks for the web site, o2k . Is there a particular reason you don't like Guy Savoy? Which *** restaurant would you choose instead?

I wanted to go to back to Taillevent, but my friends said we've been before, so let's try something new.
Dorlee I have dined at Guy Savoy a couple of times and the meals were not memorable. However, every meal I have had at Taillevent has been memorable. I also think that their service is very warm and dignified. A few years ago, the owners of Tailllevent opened a wonderful bistro ( or brasserie; I always confuse the two). http://www.taillevent.com/english/angle/angle.html
The food was memorable, the ambiance was warm and inviting and, best of all, Taillevent, with little fanfare, insists, that its staff rotate between the high-end restaurant (Taillevent) and the lower-end (L'angle du Faubourg). Knowing you and some of your travel partners, I very much recommend this restaurant. Truly, you will not be disappointed. Indeed, you will love it.
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Old Apr 13, 05, 8:22 pm
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The website states that the hotel is closed from July 29th to August 29th - an annual closure?
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Old Apr 13, 05, 8:34 pm
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Dear o2k, again you come through with great advice! As I will be in Paris for five days I will try to get to L'Angle du Faubourg.....perhaps after an afternoon of shopping on Rue Faubourg
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Old Apr 14, 05, 12:49 am
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I would go back to Taillevent. But if that wasnt in the cards I would go to Pierre Gagnaire in a heartbeat. Read the Michelin guide about them as well as some of the stuff Patricia Wells has written about them. I think food wise it stands above Taillevent or any of the places in NYC (Le Bernardin, Daniel, John George, Ducasse). I prefer the service and atmosphere a little at Taillevent which is why I would give them the nod. But food wise I think Gagnaire is really tough to top.
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Old Apr 14, 05, 12:54 am
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Speaking of Patricia Wells Here is her review of L'Angle du Fauborg
http://www.patriciawells.com/reviews/iht/2002/0802.htm
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Old Apr 14, 05, 1:43 am
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I most heartily second (or third) L'Angle du Faubourg. We went to L'Angle before Taillevant and we enjoyed both immensely.

Taillevent, for me, is still the greatest dining experience I have ever had, from the time I entered the restaurant to the time I left. Even the 600 Euro lunch tab was worth every penny I could squeeze out of my piggy bank!! The lobster boudin entree was sublime and my all time favourite.

We went to Gagnaire and while we enjoyed some culinary epiphanies, I found that not everything Gagnaire did worked, and it is not a place where I find I could return time and time again. I can most certainly return to Taillevant time and time again; it is just that my piggy bank is quite unwilling still.

For serious gourmands, may I suggest Hiramatsu, now in the 16th, near Jamin, another outstanding but rather under-rated, thankfully, choice. Hiramatsu marries french and japanese cuisines (anyone try Sono in NYC several years ago?) and is sublime. Jamin is also outstanding and Benoit Guichard, the chef-proprietor (was General Robuchon's Colonel) is one of the most amazing sauciers I have encountered.

I also love Phillipe Legendre's Le Cinq in the Four Seasons George V -- a very delicate yet sophisticated hand in his cooking and service is flawless.

My last visit to Paris, Les Ambassadeurs was in excellent form. Atelier de Joel Robuchon was very good but it seems to get mixed reviews. Patricia Wells seems to like it though; I agree with her.

Chiberta is supposedly an up and coming restaurant which is the talk amongst most of the Cles D'Or Conciergerie in Paris. L'Astrance is also supposedly as good as ever also.

And, if you wish to try high-end-non-spring-roll-and-pho-noodle-soup Vietnamese cuisine, may I suggest Tan Dinh in Rue Verneuil near the D'Orsay. It is a family business, father and son are maitre d' and sommelier, mother is host, and other son is chef and they pride themselves in the pairing beautiful and fairly priced bordeaux and bourgogne with the meal. It is one of my most favourite places in Paris.

Finally, most Parisian restaurants have annual closings during the summer, usually in August. Taillevent and L'Angle is usually closed from late July to late August.
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Old Apr 14, 05, 8:48 am
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Taillevent is also my favorite restaurant in the world. I have been there a half a dozen or more times, and would never hesitate to go back. I just wanted to offer some other options. Gagnaire is possibly the most adventurous of the 3 star chefs in Paris. I think that Patricia Wells said if she had to pick somewhere for her last meal it would be there. Ive been there 3 or 4 times and been overwhelmed each time but I can see how he could make some moves that didnt work. On the other hand, I tried the hare with blood sauce, a fall special at Taillevent, and that didnt work for my American taste (nor for those of a Swiss friend with us who also ordered it I might add).

Two others you might try are L'Arpage and L'Ambroisie. I have been to L'Arpage and was very impressed. It is not as traditional as Taillevent but it was excellent. It had some very interesting dishes. I have not been to L'Ambroisie but it was recommended to me by the former maitre de at Ducasse in New York. I had a long conversation with him while I was in Ducasse one night a couple years ago. He had worked at Pierre Gagnaire before moving to Ducasse. When we were discussing Gagnaire, Taillevent and others he said if I wanted to try something really special he would very much recommend L'Ambroisie among the 3 stars in Paris. Havent gotten there yet myself but it is on my list to be sure.
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Old Apr 14, 05, 9:24 am
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I have heard similar praise of Bernard Pacaud's cooking at L'Ambroisie. For some reason I have problems with spending 200 Euro plus per person for a vegetarian meal -- while I am sure Alain Passard is a genius with the veggies.... I can't help but want meat for 200 Euro plus....

One problem is that Guy Savoy, L'Ambroisie, L'Arpege, and Plaza Athenee (Ducasse) are terribly expensive restaurants. Last I checked I do not think they offer sub-100 Euro lunch menu's like Taillevent, Les Ambassadeurs, Hiramatsu, and Le Cinq do..... oh, how can I forget, Le Bristol Restaurant is also quite excellent too....

Outside of Paris I enjoyed Le Moulin de Mougins, just outside of Cannes -- my sister and I spent Canada Day (July 1) there one year and it was just so lovely, likely my 2nd most favourite restaurant in the world. Le Louis XV in Monaco was outstanding too, sitting on the terrace with a private view on to the Place du Casino......

Still remaining, Auberge de L'ill in Illhausern; Troisgros in Roanne; Le Pyramide in Vienne; plus a handful of others......
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