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-   -   Where to buy a bottle of good wine in Levallois-Perret on a Sunday afternoon? (https://www.flyertalk.com/forum/france-monaco/1968620-where-buy-bottle-good-wine-levallois-perret-sunday-afternoon.html)

henry999 May 7, 19 11:00 am

Where to buy a bottle of good wine in Levallois-Perret on a Sunday afternoon?
 
Title says it all, really. I'm going to a dinner party in the evening. Flying in mid-afternoon from Europe, so 'duty-free' is not an option and local prices at the origin are punitive, compared to ordinary French retail. Looking online, I see that most places near my friend's house are either closed altogether on Sunday or are open until maybe 13.00. I want to bring something nice for the host, not an ordinary vin-de-table from the mom-and-pop shop on the corner. My plan is to take the RER from CDG to Gare du Nord and connect to the metro. I will have plenty of time, so if there is someplace worth checking that is not too far out of the way, I can easily go there as an alternative. Merci.

ajGoes May 7, 19 1:49 pm

Are your friends French? If so, you might want to re-think your plan. One evening my parents and I arrived at their Parisian friends' apartment where we were going to dine and stay a couple of nights. I had read that French hosts are insulted if you bring a bottle of wine with you when invited to dine at their homes, but that barely prepared me for our host's stunned look when my father handed him one. He recovered quickly and thanked my father — but the bottle of crémant went onto a shelf.

French people consider wine selection to be a key part of preparing a dinner. They're not likely to serve a wine that just happens to arrive at their door with one of their guests. :)

henry999 May 7, 19 11:20 pm


Originally Posted by ajGoes
Are your friends French?

No.

NickB May 9, 19 3:45 am


Originally Posted by ajGoes (Post 31076752)
Are your friends French? If so, you might want to re-think your plan. One evening my parents and I arrived at their Parisian friends' apartment where we were going to dine and stay a couple of nights. I had read that French hosts are insulted if you bring a bottle of wine with you when invited to dine at their homes, but that barely prepared me for our host's stunned look when my father handed him one. He recovered quickly and thanked my father — but the bottle of crémant went onto a shelf.

French people consider wine selection to be a key part of preparing a dinner. They're not likely to serve a wine that just happens to arrive at their door with one of their guests. :)

I am sometimes surprised by what I read about France and French people on this forum.

Bringing a bottle of wine as a thank you token when invited for a meal is quite common in France too. On the other hand, there is no necessary expectation that it will be consumed on the spot. There could be all sorts of reasons why you would want to put away and keep the bottle for future consumption rather than serve it straightaway so the fact that the bottle is not opened at the dinner party at which it is offered is not a sign of slight or offense. Sometimes I will serve a bottle that a guest brings and most of the time I won't. I don't think that this is specific to France either. Practices in the UK would be similar, for instance.

henry999 May 13, 19 1:54 am

For the benefit of anyone who may search this topic in the future, I will follow up on my own thread and perhaps close it out.

Further online research revealed that there is nothing, or next to nothing, of a retail nature that is open in Levallois after about 13.00 on a Sunday. Therefore, I modified my plan. I found a Monoprix with a good wine selection just a few hundred metres from Opéra so I took the Roissybus from CDG. Then, after making my purchase, I took the #3 metro directly from Opéra to Levallois. Yes, the bus is slower than RER>4>3 but I was not in a hurry so I traded time for convenience.

All's well that ends well.

NickB May 13, 19 6:35 am


Originally Posted by henry999 (Post 31095295)
For the benefit of anyone who may search this topic in the future, I will follow up on my own thread and perhaps close it out.

Further online research revealed that there is nothing, or next to nothing, of a retail nature that is open in Levallois after about 13.00 on a Sunday. Therefore, I modified my plan. I found a Monoprix with a good wine selection just a few hundred metres from Opéra so I took the Roissybus from CDG. Then, after making my purchase, I took the #3 metro directly from Opéra to Levallois. Yes, the bus is slower than RER>4>3 but I was not in a hurry so I traded time for convenience.

All's well that ends well.

Thanks for the update. As a general, rule, most shops are not allowed to open on a Sunday in France, except food and drinks shops before 13H00 or small shops which have no employees and are entirely owner-operated. There are some derogations, however, including derogations for touristic areas. A list of "international" touristic areas where opening on Sundays is allowed is here. This includes multiple areas in Paris, albeit not all of Paris. In the Parisian suburbs, only the area around Disneyland is deemed a touristic area for these purposes. Other areas can be designated as touristic areas (or also exempted "commercial areas") by the local state authority ("the "prefect"). Border areas can also be exempted.. There are also some additional ad hoc exemptions.

Goldorak May 13, 19 8:42 am


Originally Posted by NickB (Post 31082464)
I am sometimes surprised by what I read about France and French people on this forum.

Bringing a bottle of wine as a thank you token when invited for a meal is quite common in France too. On the other hand, there is no necessary expectation that it will be consumed on the spot. There could be all sorts of reasons why you would want to put away and keep the bottle for future consumption rather than serve it straightaway so the fact that the bottle is not opened at the dinner party at which it is offered is not a sign of slight or offense. Sometimes I will serve a bottle that a guest brings and most of the time I won't. I don't think that this is specific to France either. Practices in the UK would be similar, for instance.

I fully agree with you. It is absolutely not an offense to offer a bottle of wine and this the most common gift along with flowers. As you said, there are plenty of reasons to not serve upfront the one just offered like because the host has already open in advance a bottle of red wine for oxygenation, or the guest has bring a bottle of red wine while the main course will be fish, or the guest bring a bottle of white wine or champagne that is not cold enough to be enjoyed properly, etc etc.


Originally Posted by NickB (Post 31095772)
Thanks for the update. As a general, rule, most shops are not allowed to open on a Sunday in France, except food and drinks shops before 13H00 or small shops which have no employees and are entirely owner-operated. There are some derogations, however, including derogations for touristic areas. A list of "international" touristic areas where opening on Sundays is allowed is here. This includes multiple areas in Paris, albeit not all of Paris. In the Parisian suburbs, only the area around Disneyland is deemed a touristic area for these purposes. Other areas can be designated as touristic areas (or also exempted "commercial areas") by the local state authority ("the "prefect"). Border areas can also be exempted.. There are also some additional ad hoc exemptions.

Things have changed a lot since Macron laws. I live in Paris (in a non-touristic neighborhood, purely residential) and all food supermarkets (like Monoprix, Franprix and equiivalent) are open all day on Sunday for at least 2 years. Exceptions apply of course.

NickB May 13, 19 9:41 am


Originally Posted by Goldorak (Post 31096113)

I fully agree with you. It is absolutely not an offense to offer a bottle of wine and this the most common gift along with flowers. As you said, there are plenty of reasons to not serve upfront the one just offered like because the host has already open in advance a bottle of red wine for oxygenation, or the guest has bring a bottle of red wine while the main course will be fish, or the guest bring a bottle of white wine or champagne that is not cold enough to be enjoyed properly, etc etc.


Things have changed a lot since Macron laws. I live in Paris (in a non-touristic neighborhood, purely residential) and all food supermarkets (like Monoprix, Franprix and equiivalent) are open all day on Sunday for at least 2 years. Exceptions apply of course.

Yes, It is usually straightforward in Paris, less so in the provinces outside large cities. I would have to drive for a good 35-40 mins from my home in the South of France to find a food shop other than a bakery open on a Sunday afternoon.

mlin32 May 13, 19 10:55 am

Indeed even most medium-sized cities like Nancy or Dijon have corner markets (like Carrefour City or Contact) open Sunday mornings. I like that, takes a bit of stress off Saturdays :)

Way better than Germany, where opening on holidays or Sundays is still prohibited (we live in 2019, the last time I checked.......but the Germans haven't figured that out yet) :rolleyes:


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