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Give Blood. It may save a life...YOURS!

Give Blood. It may save a life...YOURS!

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Old Jun 17, 16, 7:25 am
  #556  
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Originally Posted by rdurlabhji View Post
Its tough for those of us that end up in "exotic" places at least once a year. I'd love to donate blood but I also love to travel and end up somewhere on the malaria or zika blacklist pretty often.
Unfortunately, this is true for a number of us.
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Old Jun 17, 16, 10:44 am
  #557  
 
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I've donated platelets 4 weeks in a row--I'm amazed I've passed the iron check each time. Guess those iron tablets are working. I wouldn't normally be donating this often, but I'll be moving soon and starting a new job, so I want to get ahead some.
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Old Jun 19, 16, 8:21 am
  #558  
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I tried to go last week, but all their chairs in the evening were full.

Hope to get in the schedule this week. <fingers crossed>

Sorry to hear that you'll be leaving BOS, but I guess that'll mean less competition for platelet spots in the schedule.
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Old Jun 23, 16, 1:17 pm
  #559  
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Donating blood as we speak

Pint #: 97
BP: 111/64
Pulse: 80
Blood Type: Red
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Old Jun 30, 16, 5:46 am
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Giving blood is actually great. However, not everyone can do that especially those who may have health conditions. To those who are physically fit or healthy donating blood is actually one way to save many lives.
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Old Jul 1, 16, 8:32 am
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Originally Posted by cmn.jcs View Post
I've donated platelets 4 weeks in a row--I'm amazed I've passed the iron check each time. Guess those iron tablets are working. I wouldn't normally be donating this often, but I'll be moving soon and starting a new job, so I want to get ahead some.
Is donating platelets more painful or time consuming than normal blood donation?
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Old Jul 1, 16, 10:07 am
  #562  
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Originally Posted by Zooter View Post
Is donating platelets more painful or time consuming than normal blood donation?
The process of apheresis can take anywhere from 90 minutes to three hours, depending on a number of factors: the type of machine being used and whether you are giving a single, double or triple amount of platelets as two of those factors.

The “pain” is similar in both cases; but it only lasts momentarily if the needle is administered correctly by the phlebotomist.

I have donated platelets at least 125 times. For many people, the most significant “concern” is what to do to pass the time while donating platelets.
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Old Jul 1, 16, 10:31 am
  #563  
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Originally Posted by Canarsie View Post
The “pain” is similar in both cases; but it only lasts momentarily if the needle is administered correctly by the phlebotomist.
That depends -- my local place no longer does dual-needle apheresis, but with the older dual-needle kind you would have two needle sticks.

With the newer, single needle kind you have both intake and return of the blood and if you don't have good veins (A) you can't do apheresis (whether platelet or double RBC) at all, and (B) the failure of the return is relatively painful, much more so than donating whole blood.

I've been asked several times to give platelets and after two failures just have to say "no." I'm not sure how one predicts having good enough veins for the return flow.
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Old Jul 1, 16, 10:43 am
  #564  
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Originally Posted by nkedel View Post
That depends -- my local place no longer does dual-needle apheresis, but with the older dual-needle kind you would have two needle sticks.

With the newer, single needle kind you have both intake and return of the blood and if you don't have good veins (A) you can't do apheresis (whether platelet or double RBC) at all, and (B) the failure of the return is relatively painful, much more so than donating whole blood.

I've been asked several times to give platelets and after two failures just have to say "no." I'm not sure how one predicts having good enough veins for the return flow.
Interestingly, the place which I frequent had the dual-needle apheresis machines before employing the single-needle types, which are great because they leave one hand available to read or control a device to listen to music...

...but after a few years, they then reverted back to the dual-needle models. I forgot what was the specific reason — perhaps due to what you mentioned — but there was something about the single-needle machines which caused them to revert...
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Old Jul 1, 16, 1:27 pm
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Originally Posted by Canarsie View Post
Interestingly, the place which I frequent had the dual-needle apheresis machines before employing the single-needle types, which are great because they leave one hand available to read or control a device to listen to music...

...but after a few years, they then reverted back to the dual-needle models. I forgot what was the specific reason — perhaps due to what you mentioned — but there was something about the single-needle machines which caused them to revert...
I'd like to be able to give platelets (there seems to be a relatively good supply of A+ around here), and was told that the dual-needle ones would work a lot better for my kind of veins. Sadly, they haven't gone back.

I need to give them a call to see if my most recent trip outside the US counts as a travel deferral or not -- sadly, I think it did.
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Old Jul 1, 16, 8:49 pm
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Originally Posted by Canarsie View Post
Interestingly, the place which I frequent had the dual-needle apheresis machines before employing the single-needle types, which are great because they leave one hand available to read or control a device to listen to music...

...but after a few years, they then reverted back to the dual-needle models. I forgot what was the specific reason — perhaps due to what you mentioned — but there was something about the single-needle machines which caused them to revert...
The place I donate was originally single-arm donations (back in 2012, no guarantees on what it was prior). I think it was ~2 years ago that they went to double-arm as the standard--the reason I've heard is something about product quality--double-arm is better, but not sure how it leads to better quality. I do know the machines are capable of single-arm, and the staff will do it on request, but it seems that orders from on high encourage double.
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Old Jul 6, 16, 5:19 pm
  #567  
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Originally Posted by Canarsie View Post
For many people, the most significant “concern” is what to do to pass the time while donating platelets.
Certainly agree. When I used to be on the one-arm machines, I'd bring an iPad to read or play games. Now the new center I've been going to for the last couple of years uses the Amicus machines and prefers the two-arm donation. See prior post. Thankfully, the center that cmn.jcs and I go to has Netflix/Hulu accounts (via Roku) on each TV that's attached to each chair.


Originally Posted by nkedel View Post
With the newer, single needle kind you have both intake and return of the blood and if you don't have good veins (A) you can't do apheresis (whether platelet or double RBC) at all, and (B) the failure of the return is relatively painful, much more so than donating whole blood.
When I started giving, it was on a one-arm machine. I was quite apprehensive about having both arms immobile when I switched over to the Amicus machines. However, I've now not only become accustomed to them, but also slightly prefer them. In the past, I was always a little bothered by the return in the same arm. Never painful...just never really enjoyed the sensation of the return happening every minute or so.
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Old Jul 7, 16, 10:16 am
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Originally Posted by Canarsie View Post
The process of apheresis can take anywhere from 90 minutes to three hours, depending on a number of factors: the type of machine being used and whether you are giving a single, double or triple amount of platelets as two of those factors.

The “pain” is similar in both cases; but it only lasts momentarily if the needle is administered correctly by the phlebotomist.

I have donated platelets at least 125 times. For many people, the most significant “concern” is what to do to pass the time while donating platelets.
What's the rationale for donating platelets? Is there a greater need because fewer people donate? Due to the greater time commitment?
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Old Jul 7, 16, 10:23 am
  #569  
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Originally Posted by Zooter View Post
What's the rationale for donating platelets? Is there a greater need because fewer people donate? Due to the greater time commitment?
There is a high demand for platelets; and one donation is equivalent to up to 18 donations of whole blood.
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Old Sep 6, 16, 1:41 pm
  #570  
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First time in 40 years of donating that I was denied . Low iron and they attempted 3 times but it was a no-go. Rescheduled for Thursday morning and hopefully the steak I have for supper on Wednesday night helps
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