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2013: Dahl Scholarship - Win Ride on T-6 Racer, a 787 sim, a F16 sim or fishing trip

2013: Dahl Scholarship - Win Ride on T-6 Racer, a 787 sim, a F16 sim or fishing trip

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Old Sep 3, 13, 3:47 pm
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Broke Lasy Years Donations

Originally Posted by canadiancow View Post
I just donated and Capt Denny helped me sort out the details for a corporate match.
canadiancow and miffSC donated today and we exceeded last years donations of $19,236. We are currently at $19.377 with four days to go. In 2012 we raised just over $60,000 and gave out $25,000 in scholarship funds. The remaining amount was deposited to continue to grow our fund. None of the board members are paid and our administrative costs are minimal. You all can be assured that all your donations are making a difference in the lives of our future aviators.

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Old Sep 3, 13, 4:14 pm
  #62  
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moved

Last edited by Kagehitokiri; Sep 7, 13 at 10:58 pm
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Old Sep 3, 13, 6:47 pm
  #63  
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when companies match, if an employee wasnt aware that their employer would, would employers do it "retroactively" ?

wonder if any companies/etc would be willing to do some kind of donation once FT totals reach $75K or $100K
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Old Sep 3, 13, 10:35 pm
  #64  
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Originally Posted by Kagehitokiri View Post
when companies match, if an employee wasnt aware that their employer would, would employers do it "retroactively" ?
Having just learned how my employer's program works, I can absolutely say that they would. As long as the form is filled out within a "reasonable" time, they'll match it (after a vetting process).
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Old Sep 4, 13, 6:10 am
  #65  
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Does the employee match count towards tickets in the drawing as well?

Originally Posted by Kagehitokiri View Post
when companies match, if an employee wasnt aware that their employer would, would employers do it "retroactively" ?

wonder if any companies/etc would be willing to do some kind of donation once FT totals reach $75K or $100K
Mine wants proof that you've made the donation before they'll match it, and I've sent them match requests in December for donations made in January of that year without a problem.
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Old Sep 4, 13, 9:06 am
  #66  
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maybe email donors a list of companies that have matched? dont think that gets into privacy?

or post the list of companies, although if only a few, then there are only a few posters who mentioned doing it, so possible privacy concern.

Last edited by Kagehitokiri; Sep 4, 13 at 4:35 pm
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Old Sep 4, 13, 7:13 pm
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Company Match

Originally Posted by JeepGuyDE View Post
I'm in again this year! Just made my donation.
My company does the match. I submitted the paperwork today to have my donation matched.
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Old Sep 5, 13, 6:20 am
  #68  
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Originally Posted by Kagehitokiri View Post
maybe email donors a list of companies that have matched? dont think that gets into privacy?

or post the list of companies, although if only a few, then there are only a few posters who mentioned doing it, so possible privacy concern.
It's employers of FT members that match donations, so I don't know that a lot of FT members would want that information published.
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Old Sep 5, 13, 7:28 am
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Untold Story

Thought you would like to see this.




How many of you know Retired UAL Captain John Penney? Maybe you even followed the fun he had for many years as the pilot of "Rare Bear" in the Reno Air Races … or maybe he told you the story of his MiG Masters business … I shared a "management cubicle" with John Penney and Jason Dahl at the United Flight Training Center before I retired and got to know both of them pretty well.




Well, This is the story of another member of the Penney family; John's daughter Heather, and the story of her harrowing experience on the morning of September 11, 2001.




Carl

PS: When you are finished reading below… , this tells the "Rest of the Story": http://tinyurl.com/679kwlc








Subj: Mission unimaginable



















16 pilot Lt. Heather Lucky Penney was ready to give her life ...





The events of Sept. 11, 2001, put an F-16 pilot into the


sky with orders to bring down United Flight 93

Late in the morning of the Tuesday that changed everything, Lt. Heather



“Lucky” Penney was on a runway at Andrews Air Force Base and ready


to fly. She had her hand on the throttle of an F-16 and she had her orders:


Bring down United Airlines Flight 93. The day’s fourth hijacked airliner


seemed to be hurtling toward Washington. Penney, one of the first two


combat pilots in the air that morning, was told to stop it.
alt-tag
“I genuinely believed that was going to be the last time I took off,”


says Maj. Heather “Lucky” Penney, remembering the Sept. 11 attacks


and the initial U.S. reaction.

The one thing she didn’t have as she roared into the crystalline sky


was live ammunition. Or missiles. Or anything at all to throw at a hostile


aircraft. Except her own plane. So that was the plan. Because the


surprise attacks were unfolding, in that innocent age, faster than they


could arm war planes, Penney and her commanding officer went up to


fly their jets straight into a Boeing 757.






“We wouldn’t be shooting it down. We’d be ramming the aircraft,”


Penney recalls of her charge that day. “I would essentially be a kamikaze


pilot.”For years, Penney, one of the first generation of female combat


pilots in the country, gave no interviews about her experiences on


Sept. 11 (which included, eventually, escorting Air Force One back into



Washington’s suddenly highly restricted airspace).




But 10 years later, she is reflecting on one of the lesser-told tales of that


endlessly examined morning: how the first counterpunch the U.S. military


prepared to throw at the attackers was effectively a suicide mission.



“We had to protect the airspace any way we could,” she said last week


in her office at Lockheed Martin, where she is a director in the F-35 program.


Penney, now a major but still a petite blonde with a Colgate grin, is no longer


a combat flier. She flew two tours in Iraq and she serves as a part-time


National Guard pilot, mostly hauling VIPs around in a military Gulfstream.


She takes the stick of her own vintage 1941 Taylorcraft tail-dragger


whenever she can.






But none of her thousands of hours in the air quite compare with the urgent


rush of launching on what was supposed to be a one-way flight to a midair


collision. First of her kind.






She was a rookie in the autumn of 2001, the first female F-16 pilot they’d


ever had at the 121st Fighter Squadron of the D.C. Air National Guard. She


had grown up smelling jet fuel. Her father flew jets in Vietnam and still races


them. Penney got her pilot’s license when she was a literature major at


Purdue. She planned to be a teacher. But during a graduate program in


American studies, Congress opened up combat aviation to women and


Penney was nearly first in line.





“I signed up immediately,” she says. “I wanted to be a fighter pilot like my dad.”



On that Tuesday, they had just finished two weeks of air combat training in


Nevada. They were sitting around a briefing table when someone looked in


to say a plane had hit the World Trade Center in New York. When it happened


once, they assumed it was some yahoo in a Cessna. When it happened again,


they knew it was war. But the surprise was complete. In the monumental


confusion of those first hours, it was impossible to get clear orders. Nothing


was ready. The jets were still equipped with dummy bullets from the training


mission.






As remarkable as it seems now, there were no armed aircraft standing by


and no system in place to scramble them over Washington. Before that


morning, all eyes were looking outward, still scanning the old Cold War


threat paths for planes and missiles coming over the polar ice cap. “There


was no perceived threat at the time, especially one coming from the


homeland like that,” says Col. George Degnon, vice commander of the 113th


Wing at Andrews. “It was a little bit of a helpless feeling, but we did everything


humanly possible to get the aircraft armed and in the air. It was amazing to


see people react.”






Things are different today, .Degnon says. At least two “hot-cocked” planes


are ready at all times, their pilots never more than yards from the cockpit.


A third plane hit the Pentagon, and almost at once came word that a fourth


plane could be on the way, maybe more. The jets would be armed within an


hour, but somebody had to fly now, weapons or no weapons.





“Lucky, you’re coming with me,” barked Col. Marc Sasseville.






They were gearing up in the pre-flight life-support area when Sasseville,


struggling into his flight suit, met her eye.“I’m going to go for the cockpit,”


Sasseville said. She replied without hesitating. “I’ll take the tail.”


It was a plan. And a pact.





‘Let’s go!’






Penney had never scrambled a jet before. Normally the pre-flight is a half-hour


or so of methodical checks. She automatically started going down the list.





“Lucky, what are you doing? Get your butt up there and let’s go!” Sasseville shouted.



She climbed in, rushed to power up the engine, screamed for her ground


crew to pull the chocks. The crew chief still had his headphones plugged


into the fuselage as she nudged the throttle forward. He ran along pulling


safety pins from the jet as it moved forward.






She muttered a fighter pilot’s prayer — “God, don’t let me [expletive] up” —


and followed Sasse.ville into the sky.






They screamed over the smoldering Pentagon, heading northwest at more


than 400 mph, flying low and scanning the clear horizon. Her commander had


time to think about the best place to hit the enemy.






“We don’t train to bring down airliners,” said Sasseville, now stationed at the


Pentagon. “If you just hit the engine, it could still glide and you could guide it


to a target. My thought was the cockpit or the wing.”






He also thought about his ejection seat. Would there be an instant just before


impact?



“I was hoping to do both at the same time,” he says. “It probably wasn’t going


to work, but that’s what I was hoping.”





Penney worried about missing the target if she tried to bail out.





“If you eject and your jet soars through without impact .





  . .” she trails off, the thought of failing more dreadful than the thought of dying.




But she didn’t have to die. She didn’t have to knock down an airliner full of kids


and salesmen and girlfriends. They did that themselves.




It would be hours before Penney and Sasseville learned that United 93 had


already gone down in Pennsylvania, an insurrection by hostages willing to


do just what the two Guard pilots had been willing to do: Anything. And everything.


“The real heroes are the passengers on Flight 93 who were willing to sacrifice


themselves,” Penney says. “I was just an accidental witness to history.” She


and Sasseville flew the rest of the day, clearing the airspace, escorting the


president, looking down onto a city that would soon be sending them to war.


She’s a single mom of two girls now. She still loves to fly. And she still thinks


often of that extraordinary ride down the runway a decade ago.






“I genuinely believed that was going to be the last time I took off,” she says.


“If we did it right, this would be it."










OK … Here is the link to "The Rest Of The Story" mentioned above: http://tinyurl.com/679kwlc




Oh … a couple of more articles and video on Col. John Penney …




His Rare Bear Win with a dead stick landing … Written by John

http://www.rarebear.com/bearfacts/jo...ember_2007.htm




A short Bio on John Penney …

http://www.rarebear.com/bearfacts/jo...ember_2007.htm




Great John Penney Video

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NLNUx6KDCSI




Yes, another John Penney video with daughter Heather as well

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0dxlJuJ-8C0
















YouTube - Videos from this email
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Old Sep 5, 13, 7:30 am
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New total update

Currently we are at $19,527.

Thank you all for your support!

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Old Sep 5, 13, 8:00 am
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Capt Denny, there are no words. thank you for your continued posts and involvement with Dahl Scholarship.

Originally Posted by kipper View Post
It's employers of FT members that match donations, so I don't know that a lot of FT members would want that information published.
my original comment was just emailing FT donors the list of companies that have matched, whether those companies are currently connected with an FT donor or not. i dont think there would be any privacy concerns with that? although i guess any donor could then public the list.. oh well, was a thought. FT donors who got matches could be asked what their opinion is, privately.

Last edited by Kagehitokiri; Sep 5, 13 at 8:06 am
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Old Sep 5, 13, 8:40 am
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Originally Posted by Kagehitokiri View Post
my original comment was just emailing FT donors the list of companies that have matched, whether those companies are currently connected with an FT donor or not. i dont think there would be any privacy concerns with that? although i guess any donor could then public the list.. oh well, was a thought. FT donors who got matches could be asked what their opinion is, privately.
Why the interest in what companies have matched donations? If you want to know if your company matches charitable donations, simply send an email to HR.
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Old Sep 5, 13, 9:10 am
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Originally Posted by kipper View Post
Why the interest in what companies have matched donations? If you want to know if your company matches charitable donations, simply send an email to HR.
i have zero interest and im not an FT donor so would not have received the list based on my original comment.

people may not ask, or get/have gotten an answer of no that was incorrect and should have been yes.
there also hasnt been a TON of discussion of matching, so people may not see it when donating?

if not already done, might mention employer matching on donation site/etc.

Last edited by Kagehitokiri; Sep 5, 13 at 11:17 am
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Old Sep 5, 13, 9:22 am
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Originally Posted by Kagehitokiri View Post
im not interested and im not an FT donor so would not have received the list based on my original comment.

people may not ask, or get/have gotten an answer of no that was incorrect and should have been yes.
there also hasnt been a TON of discussion of matching, so people may not see it when donating?

if not already done, might mention employer matching on donation site/etc.
If the list of matching companies is big enough, I wouldn't mind the list being shared. I don't try to hide my employer from FT, but I certainly don't want it advertised either
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Old Sep 5, 13, 11:10 am
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I Agree

Originally Posted by Kagehitokiri View Post
Capt Denny, there are no words. thank you for your continued posts and involvement with Dahl Scholarship.


I totally agree. If I had the list of companies that gave matching donations then we can put them on the initial post next year. Additionally you would get more chances with the match.

Capt Denny

my original comment was just emailing FT donors the list of companies that have matched, whether those companies are currently connected with an FT donor or not. i dont think there would be any privacy concerns with that? although i guess any donor could then public the list.. oh well, was a thought. FT donors who got matches could be asked what their opinion is, privately.
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