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FT Cares! Suicide prevention resources and listings: please add

FT Cares! Suicide prevention resources and listings: please add

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Old Jun 6, 18, 2:04 am   -   Wikipost
Please read: This is a community-maintained wiki post containing the most important information from this thread. You may edit the Wiki once you have been on FT for 90 days and have made 90 posts.
 
Last edit by: JDiver
Wiki Link
USA National Suicide Prevention Lifeline
Call 1-800-273-8255
Available 24 hours everyday
Link to online chat


Statements of suicidal ideation, both direct or indirect (“I think it would be so much easier for everyone if I just died”) should be considered as serious and followed up on.
People who are fascinated with the details of others’ suicide should be followed up on.
People expressing feelings of despair, helplessness, hopelessness and powerlessness should be followed up on.
Following up can mean asking questions to probe intent or plans,
and encouraging the person reach out for professional help.
Expressions of concern, support for positive action are helpful.
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Old Jan 24, 13, 2:05 pm
  #1  
Moderator: American AAdvantage, TAP, Mexico, Technical Support and Feedback, and The Suggestion Box
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Arrow FT Cares! Suicide prevention resources and listings: please add

From time to time, we have had occasion to respond to someone with information about local national suicide prevention and crisis intervention resources our members can have access to. If you know someone who is suicidal or has attempted suicide, here are some recommendations and listing of resources (though these are USA resources, some of the information is applicable, and an international listing follows in the following posts).

With many years in suicidology (since ~1970) I’d recommend offering your support and letting your friend determine what they can best benefit from. Keep in touch regularly, continue to offer support and a friendly, willing ear. Encourage and support positive action. Suicidal thought is a sign of desperation, but it’s tempered with ambivalence. People considering or intent on suicide will often seek more beneficial actions — they just are blinded to them or don’t know about them at the moment. They often may not seek help or endure in silence because of the stigma and misinformation about suicide and suicide attempts. In the US:

National Suicide Prevention Lifelinelink
We can all help prevent suicide. The Lifeline provides 24/7, free and confidential support for people in distress, prevention and crisis resources for you or your loved ones, and best practices for professionals.

24/7 call 1-800-273-8255


American Foundation for Suicide Prevention
link to support page
link to extensive resources listing page


Suicide Prevention and Resource Centerlink


Suicide Awareness and Voices in Education (SAVE) — link


healthline Suicide Prevention Resource Guide (resource listing and links) — link


The Mighty (links to resources and stories of previously suicidal people) — link


If anyone involved is a veteran (e.g. the suicidal person is a veteran), you can reach the Veterans Crisis Line by calling 1-800-273-8255 and Pressing 1. You can also send a text to 838255.


FlyerTalk listing of international suicide prevention resources — link


For those who aren’t familiar with suicide:

5 Common Myths About Suicide Debunked (NAMI) — link

By Kristen Fuller, M.D. | Sep. 06, 2018

Suicide affects all people. Within the past year, about 41,000 individuals died by suicide, 1.3 million adults have attempted suicide, 2.7 million adults have had a plan to attempt suicide and 9.3 million adults have had suicidal thoughts.

Unfortunately, our society often paints suicide the way they would a prison sentence—a permanent situation that brands an individual. However, suicidal ideation is not a brand or a label, it is a sign that an individual is suffering deeply and must seek treatment. And it is falsehoods like these that can prevent people from getting the help they need to get better.

Debunking the common myths associated with suicide can help society realize the importance of helping others seek treatment and show individuals the importance of addressing their mental health challenges.

Here are some of the most common myths and facts about suicide.

Myth: Suicide only affects individuals with a mental health condition.

Fact: Many individuals with mental illness are not affected by suicidal thoughts and not all people who attempt or die by suicide have mental illness. Relationship problems and other life stressors such as criminal/legal matters, persecution, eviction/loss of home, death of a loved one, a devastating or debilitating illness, trauma, sexual abuse, rejection, and recent or impending crises are also associated with suicidal thoughts and attempts.

Myth: Once an individual is suicidal, he or she will always remain suicidal.

Fact: Active suicidal ideation is often short-term and situation-specific. Studies have shown that approximately 54% of individuals who have died by suicide did not have a diagnosable mental health disorder. And for those with mental illness, the proper treatment can help to reduce symptoms.

The act of suicide is often an attempt to control deep, painful emotions and thoughts an individual is experiencing. Once these thoughts dissipate, so will the suicidal ideation. While suicidal thoughts can return, they are not permanent. An individual with suicidal thoughts and attempts can live a long, successful life.

Myth: Most suicides happen suddenly without warning.

Fact: Warning signs—verbally or behaviorally—precede most suicides. Therefore, it’s important to learn and understand the warnings signs associated with suicide. Many individuals who are suicidal may only show warning signs to those closest to them. These loved ones may not recognize what’s going on, which is how it may seem like the suicide was sudden or without warning.

Myth: People who die by suicide are selfish and take the easy way out.

Fact: Typically, people do not die by suicide because they do not want to live—people die by suicide because they want to end their suffering. These individuals are suffering so deeply that they feel helpless and hopeless. Individuals who experience suicidal ideations do not do so by choice. They are not simply, “thinking of themselves,” but rather they are going through a very serious mental health symptom due to either mental illness or a difficult life situation.

Myth: Talking about suicide will lead to and encourage suicide.

Fact: There is a widespread stigma associated with suicide and as a result, many people are afraid to speak about it. Talking about suicide not only reduces the stigma, but also allows individuals to seek help, rethink their opinions and share their story with others. We all need to talk more about suicide.

Debunking these common myths about suicide can hopefully allow individuals to look at suicide from a different angle—one of understanding and compassion for an individual who is internally struggling. Maybe they are struggling with a mental illness or maybe they are under extreme pressure and do not have healthy coping skills or a strong support system.

As a society, we should not be afraid to speak up about suicide, to speak up about mental illness or to seek out treatment for an individual who is in need. Eliminating the stigma starts by understanding why suicide occurs and advocating for mental health awareness within our communities. There are suicide hotlines, mental health support groups, online community resources and many mental health professionals who can help any individual who is struggling with unhealthy thoughts and emotions.


Kristen Fuller M.D. is a family medicine physician with a passion for mental health. She spends her days writing content for a well-known mental health and eating disorder treatment facility, treating patients in the Emergency Room and managing an outdoor women's blog. To read more of Dr. Fuller's work visit her Psychology Today blog and her outdoor blog, GoldenStateofMinds.
Risk Of Suicide (NAMI, Aug 2019) — link

It can be frightening if someone you love talks about suicidal thoughts. It can be even more frightening if you find yourself thinking about dying or giving up on life. Not taking these kinds of thoughts seriously can have devastating outcomes, as suicide is a permanent solution to (often) temporary problems.

According to the CDC, suicide rates have increased by 30% since 1999. Nearly 45,000 lives were lost to suicide in 2016 alone. Comments or thoughts about suicide — also known as suicidal ideation — can begin small like, “I wish I wasn’t here” or “Nothing matters.” But over time, they can become more explicit and dangerous.

Warning Signs

Here are a few other warning signs of suicide:
Increased alcohol and drug use
Aggressive behavior
Withdrawal from friends, family and community
Dramatic mood swings
Impulsive or reckless behavior
Suicidal behaviors are a psychiatric emergency. If you or a loved one starts to take any of these steps, seek immediate help from a health care provider or call 911:
Collecting and saving pills or buying a weapon
Giving away possessions
Tying up loose ends, like organizing personal papers or paying off debts
Saying goodbye to friends and family
If you are unsure, a licensed mental health professional can help assess.

Risk Factors

Research has found that 46% of people who die by suicide had a known mental health condition. Several other things may put a person at risk of suicide, including:

A family history of suicide
Substance abuse. Drugs can create mental highs and lows that worsen suicidal thoughts.
Intoxication. More than 1 in 3 people who die from suicide are under the influence of alcohol at the time of death.
Access to firearms
A serious or chronic medical illness
Gender. Although more women than men attempt suicide, men are nearly 4x more likely to die by suicide.
A history of trauma or abuse
Prolonged stress
A recent tragedy or loss
Support In A Crisis

When a suicide-related crisis occurs, friends and family are often caught off-guard, unprepared and unsure of what to do. The behaviors of a person experiencing a crisis can be unpredictable, changing dramatically without warning.

There are a few ways to approach a suicide-crisis:

Talk openly and honestly. Don’t be afraid to ask questions like: “Do you have a plan for how you would kill yourself?”
Remove means such as guns, knives or stockpiled pills
Calmly ask simple and direct questions, like “Can I help you call your psychiatrist?”
If there are multiple people around, have one person speak at a time
Express support and concern
Don’t argue, threaten or raise your voice
Don’t debate whether suicide is right or wrong
If you’re nervous, try not to fidget or pace
Be patient

Like any other health emergency, it’s important to address a mental health crisis like suicide quickly and effectively. Unlike other health emergencies, mental health crises don’t have instructions or resources on how to help or what to expect (like the Heimlich Maneuver or CPR). That’s why NAMI created Navigating a Mental Health Crisis: A NAMI Resource Guide for Those Experiencing a Mental Health Emergency, so people experiencing mental health emergencies and their loved ones can have the answers and information they need when they need it.


If your friend or family member struggles with suicidal ideation day-to-day, let them know that they can talk with you about what they’re going through. Make sure that you adopt an open and compassionate mindset when they’re talking. Instead of “arguing” or trying to disprove any negative statements they make (“Your life isn’t that bad!”), try active listening techniques such as reflecting their feelings and summarizing their thoughts. This can help your loved one feel heard and validated.

Let them know that mental health professionals are trained to help people understand their feelings and improve mental wellness and resiliency. Psychotherapy, like cognitive behavioral therapy and dialectical behavior therapy, can help a person with thoughts of suicide recognize ineffective patterns of thinking and behavior, validate their feelings and learn coping skills. Suicidal thoughts are a symptom, just like any other — they can be treated, and they can improve over time.

Suicide is not the answer. There is hope.

Navigating A Mental Health Crisis (NAMI, a resource) — link

Last edited by JDiver; Nov 21, 19 at 12:59 pm Reason: update, etc.
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Old Jan 24, 13, 2:05 pm
  #2  
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Arrow FT Cares! Seeking international suicide prevention & crisis intervention listings

From time to time, we have had occasion to respond to someone with information about local national suicide prevention and crisis intervention resources our members can have access to. Given the broad base of FTers, we're seeking nationally accessible resources as much as possible.

For example:

Australia
Suicide Prevention Australia
Web: http://suicidepreventionaust.org
Lifeline (tollfree): 13 11 14
Suicide Call Back Service: 1300 659 467 (cost of a local call)
Men’s Line: 1300 78 99 78
Veterans Line: 1800 011 046
Kids Helpline: 1800 55 1800
Online crisis support chat sites: http://suicidepreventionaust.org/help/

France
SOS Help
Boite Postale 43,
Cedex 92101
Boulogne
Hotline: 01 46 21 46 46
Website: soshelpline.org

Suicide Ecoute
Paris
Hotline: 01 45 39 40 00
Website: suicide.ecoute.free.fr


E.P.E. idF. Fil Sante Jeunes
Paris
Hotline: 0800 235 236
Website: filsantejeunes.com

Fédération S.O.S Amitié France
11, rue des Immeubles industriels
75011
Paris
Hotline: (+33) (0)1 40 09 15 22
Website: sos-amitie.com

Germany
http://www.telefonseelsorge.de
  • Telefon (as below)
  • 0800/1110111
  • 0800/1110222


Has chat capabilities, etc.
If you are, or know a teen who is, contemplating suicide or in crisis:
https://www.nummergegenkummer.de/cms/website.php
Originally Posted by gabbar View Post
Germany
http://www.suizidprophylaxe.de

0800-1110111 or 0800-1110222 Nationwide, can be called free of charge, 24X7
0800-1110333 nationwide counseling services for children and young people
...

Hong Kong
Samaritans Hong Kong
Web: http://www.samaritans.org.hk
Tel: 2896 0000 24/7
Email: [email protected]
Multilingual support service; All volunteers speak English but many also speak Cantonese and Mandarin.

Ireland
National Office for Suicide Prevention
Web: http://suicideprevention.ie

Samaritans (24hrs)
Tel: 18 50 60 90 90
TXT: 087 2 60 90 90
Email: [email protected]
Web: www.dublinsamaritans.ie

1life
Tel: Freephone (24hrs): 1800 247 100
or text the word HELP to 51444

Singapore
Singapore SOS
In Singapore it is Samaritans of Singapore
Hotline: 1800 221 4444
Website: http://www.samaritans.org.sg

Switzerland
La Main Tendue
Secretariat central
Zahringerstrasse 53
Case postale 835
CH-3000
BERNE 9
Hotline: 143
Website: 143.ch
E-mail Helpline: [email protected]

United Kingdom
Samaritans
Web: www.samaritans.org
Republic of Ireland*: 1850 60 90 90
Scotland: 08457 90 90 900
United Kingdom*: 08457 90 90 90 or email [email protected]
Wales: 08457 90 90 90 (24:7) and
Welsh Language Line: 0300 123 3011 (from 7 pm to 11 pm only, 7 days a week)
*call charges apply

USA
National Suicide Prevention Lifeline
Web: http://www.suicidepreventionlifeline.org
Tel: (tollfree in US) 1-800-273-8255 (TALK) free, 24/7 connects to
.......consortium of 161 crisis centers throughout the 50 states
For Veterans, press "1"; for Spanish, press "1"
[Online contact form: http://www.suicidepreventionlifeline.org/About/Contact

Red Nacional de Prevención del Suicidio (Spanish, 24/7, tollfree)
Tel. 1-888-628-9545; para Español, oprima el "2"

The Trevor Project
Web: www.thetrevorproject.org
Tel: 1-866-4-U-TREVOR (1-866-488-73867) (the last character is not necessary; tollfree in USA)
24/7 suicide lifeline for LGBTQ youth

Worldwide
Befrienders International
www.befrienders.org
N.B. Global listings of affiliated and non-affiliated suicide prevention services
Thanks for your additions and recommendations.
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Old Jan 24, 13, 2:46 pm
  #3  
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The UK number of Samaritans is 08457 90 90 90; the ROI phone number is the one listed under UK.

There is Befrienders International - it gives national suicide prevention support agencies:

www.befrienders.org

Hong Kong Samaritans Hong Kong
Web: http://www.samaritans.org.hk
Phone: 2896 0000
Email: [email protected]

They provide a multilingual support service; All volunteers speak English but many also speak Cantonese and Mandarin.
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Old Jan 25, 13, 1:45 am
  #4  
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Ireland

National Office for Suicide Prevention
http://suicideprevention.ie

Samaritans (24hrs)
Phone: 18 50 60 90 90
TXT: 087 2 60 90 90
Email: [email protected]
www.dublinsamaritans.ie

1life
Freephone (24hrs): 1800 247 100
or text the word HELP to 51444
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Old Jan 28, 13, 11:06 pm
  #5  
 
Join Date: Oct 2012
Posts: 34
Also add The Trevor Project -- the USA's only 24/7 suicide lifeline for LGBTQ youth. Their number is 1-866-4-U-TREVOR

USA
The Trevor Project
www.thetrevorproject.org
1-866-4-U-TREVOR [Toll-free w/i USA]
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Old Feb 6, 13, 5:10 pm
  #6  
 
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Programs: aa
Posts: 253
great jobs guys im glad i joined this forum people actually care here.
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Old Feb 13, 13, 10:20 am
  #7  
formerly B7e7US
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Location: Santo Domingo, Dom. Rep. / Washington, DC
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Posts: 4,134
France

SOS Help
Boite Postale 43,
Cedex 92101
Boulogne
Hotline: 01 46 21 46 46
Website: soshelpline.org

Suicide Ecoute
Paris

Hotline: 01 45 39 40 00
Website: suicide.ecoute.free.fr


E.P.E. idF. Fil Sante Jeunes
Paris
Hotline: 0800 235 236
Website: filsantejeunes.com

Fédération S.O.S Amitié France
11, rue des Immeubles industriels
75011
Paris
Hotline: (+33) (0)1 40 09 15 22
Website: sos-amitie.com

Switzerland

La Main Tendue
Secretariat central
Zahringerstrasse 53
Case postale 835
CH-3000
BERNE 9
Hotline: 143
Website: 143.ch
E-mail Helpline: [email protected]
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Old Feb 14, 13, 12:54 pm
  #8  
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Posts: 61,670
Merci beaucoup / gracias, B7e7US.

The Castilian / Spanish speaking resources I have found have also checked out to be unreliable at this time, sadly.
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Old Feb 24, 13, 3:54 pm
  #9  
 
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Posts: 564
Singapore SOS

In Singapore it is Samaritans of Singapore. http://www.samaritans.org.sg/ Hotline : 1800 221 4444.
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Old Mar 10, 13, 6:07 am
  #10  
 
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Posts: 7,155
Japan

FIND - Federation of Inochi no Denwa, Inc.
03-3263-6165

Full list and links available at: http://www.find-j.jp/zenkoku.html
Internet Inochi no Denwa: http://www.inochinodenwa-net.jp/

For English speakers in Japan
TELL (Tokyo English Life Line)
Wesley Center 2F, 6-10-11
Minami Aoyama, Minato-ku,
Tokyo 107-0062

03-5774-0992 9:00-23:00
http://www.telljp.com

For Spanish and Portuguese speakers in Japan
Please contact Kanagawa Pref. or Shizuka Pref. Inochi no Denwa services listed below


Hokkaido
0166-23-4343 24 hrs
011-231-4343 24 hrs

Aomori
0172-33-7830 12:00-21:00

Akita
018-865-4343 12:00-21:00 (Mon-Sat) / 12:00-18:00 (Sun)

Iwate
019-654-7575 12:00-21:00 (Mon-Sat) / 12:00-18:00 (Sun)

Miyagi
022-718-4343 24 hrs

Yamagata
023-645-4343 13:00-22:00

Fukushima
024-536-4343 10:00-22:00

Gunma
027-221-0783 9:00-21:30

Ibaraki
028-643-7830 24 hrs
0284-44-0783 15:00-21:00
029-855-1000 24 hrs
029-255-1000 13:00-20:00

Saitama
048-645-4343 24 hrs

Chiba
043-227-3900 24 hrs

Tokyo
03-3264-4343 24 hrs
042-327-4343 10:00-21:00

Kanagawa
044-733-4343 24 hrs
045-335-4343 24 hrs
Spanish: 045-336-2477
Portuguese: 045-336-2488

Yamanashi
055-221-4343 16:00-22:00

Shizuoka
054-272-4343 15:00-21:00
053-473-6222 10:00-21:30
Portuguese: 053-474-0333

Niigata
025-288-4343 24 hrs

Gifu
058-277-4343 19:00-22:00

Nagano
026-223-4343 11:00-22:00
0263-29-1414 11:00-22:00

Aichi
052-931-4343 24 hrs

Mie
059-221-2525 18:00-23:00

Shiga
077-553-7387 10:00-22:00 (Fri-Sun)

Kyoto
075-864-4343 24 hrs

Nara
0742-35-1000 24 hrs

Osaka
06-6309-1121 24 hrs

Hyogo
078-371-4343 8:30-21:30 (Mon-Fri)
079-222-4343 14:00-01:00

Wakayama
073-424-5000 10:00-22:00

Tottori
0857-21-4343 12:00-21:00

Shimane
0852-26-7575 9:00-22:00

Okayama
086-245-4343 24 hrs

Hiroshima
082-221-4343 24 hrs

Kagawa
087-833-7830 24 hrs

Ehime
089-958-1111 12:00-06:00

Kochi
088-824-6300 9:00-21:00

Fukuoka
093-671-4343 24 hrs
092-741-4343 24 hrs

Saga
0952-34-4343 24 hrs

Nagasaki
095-842-4343 9:00-22:00

Kumamoto
096-353-4343 24 hrs

Oita
097-536-4343 24 hrs

Kagoshima
099-250-7000 24 hrs

Okinawa
098-888-4343 10:00-23:00

Last edited by kebosabi; Mar 10, 13 at 6:21 am
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Old Mar 11, 13, 12:29 am
  #11  
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They're not exactly national, but in the USA many colleges and universities maintain/support/sponsor excellent crisis prevention hotlines oriented toward young people, not necessarily their own students, and frequently staffed by trained student volunteers, who may be multilingual/multicultural. A search on the school website should give the phone number and hours, generally either 24/7 or evening/late night.
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Old Mar 11, 13, 5:43 am
  #12  
 
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Posts: 46
Germany
http://www.suizidprophylaxe.de

0800-1110111 or 0800-1110222 Nationwide, can be called free of charge, 24X7
0800-1110333 nationwide counseling services for children and young people

India
AASRA
91-22-27546669 24X7

Last edited by gabbar; Mar 11, 13 at 5:46 am Reason: added India
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Old Apr 12, 13, 11:51 am
  #13  
 
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Posts: 1,690
Italy

http://www.telefonoamico.it/

199 284 284
Every day from 10 to Midnight
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Old Apr 14, 13, 1:28 pm
  #14  
 
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Posts: 311
In Norway, Kirkens SOS has 24/7 phone service and chat service:

Phone: 815 33 300
Chat: https://www.kirkens-sos.no/Krisetjen...hat/index.html

The website is in Norwegian only, but given the general prevalence of English language in Norway, I would suspect that they're comfortable to deal with English speaking callers.
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Old May 23, 13, 6:35 am
  #15  
 
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Social media outreach

A listing of ways to get help for someone at risk on all social media sites:

http://emotiontechnology.com/concern...omeone-online/
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