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Why are European shower doors only halved?

Why are European shower doors only halved?

Old Nov 28, 18, 5:10 pm
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Originally Posted by Ldnn1 View Post
Although of course I do have a half shower door on the bath which I never use.
Hopefully because you have a stand alone shower!!!
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Old Nov 28, 18, 5:29 pm
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Originally Posted by stut View Post
It is just lack of available space, really. A larger sink will eat into worksurface area, and you'd end up with no space to prepare food. Having recently moved house, I've had cause to despair at the lack of kitchen worksurface in several modern house designs!
In the examples ive encountered, the sink basin is integrated with a ribbed drying tray (such as pictured), so it already takes away workable surface space. And below that tray is empty space (not a washer or anything that requires a height), so its volume that could better be used.

We have a larger sink in our house, with the same useless (to us) tray. Kitchen is getting remodeled and that'll get replaced with a proper sink good enough to bathe an infant in
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Old Nov 28, 18, 6:42 pm
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Originally Posted by deniah View Post
In the examples ive encountered, the sink basin is integrated with a ribbed drying tray (such as pictured), so it already takes away workable surface space. And below that tray is empty space (not a washer or anything that requires a height), so its volume that could better be used.

We have a larger sink in our house, with the same useless (to us) tray. Kitchen is getting remodeled and that'll get replaced with a proper sink good enough to bathe an infant in
It is not just the work surfaces, though. We also have a small galley kitchen and we use the space under the drying tray for our (slimline) dishwasher. If that space was used by a sink, we would have to locate the dishwasher elsewhere, which would take away valuable storage space. I must say that I have never found the fact that we have a small sink a significant inconvenience. When you have a small kitchen, everything tends to be in proportion so tend not to go for humungous pots and pans that you would not have the space to store anyway so the fact that the sink is not designed for those pots and pans that you do not have is hardly a problem.
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Old Nov 29, 18, 6:56 am
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I prefer large sinks in the kitchen, but they aren't as common in Europe as in say the US and parts of Asia -- even when talking about large houses with large kitchens and adequate space for a large and deep sink. Even some of my larger houses in Europe had what I considered to be small sinks, albeit they mostly had side-by-sinks (which were smaller than I'd like them to be). New kitchen fads in some parts of Europe seem to be all about getting rid of most of the kitchen counter space around the edge of the kitchen and even sometimes even from around the sinks. Can't say I like it or ever will. We don't have a Star Trek-like sci-fi food maker sparing us from using pots/pans and kitchen counters to prepare ingredients and more, and so the counter space is useful.

Originally Posted by JBord View Post
Just curious, why didn't you put full shower doors on instead? The clear glass without much hardware in your picture looks nice, but I assume a similar style full door was available. Is it just a design preference or was there some other reason, like your kid's bath time?



Yeah, I've definitely seen these. But they also do the half doors in larger bathrooms where only the area around the tub gets wet. I had one like that in Venice. The floor got all wet but the area around the vanity/sink was still dry.
Indeed. These half-shower/tub doors of glass are in place in many a European bathroom that isn't even designed to be a wet room. The half shower/tub door thing seems to have been a product of design aesthetic, ability to transport and install/replace the doors cheaply, and to perhaps minimize water usage/cost at some point in time. They seem to be less common in new-built properties today than they used to be 10-25 years ago.

Originally Posted by LondonElite View Post


I must admit I never saw that, but why?
When you have a small sink, you need somewhere to put in the dirty dishes that are waiting for a wash? Seems very practical when you have more dirty dishes to deal with than there is sink space to place them in, but there are some people who really hate plastic being used for anything related to food/drink consumption, dishware/utensils, even if it comes to trying to clean dishes/pots/pans/utensils.

Last edited by GUWonder; Nov 29, 18 at 7:12 am
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Old Nov 29, 18, 8:03 am
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Originally Posted by GUWonder View Post
I prefer large sinks in the kitchen, but they aren't as common in Europe as in say the US and parts of Asia -- even when talking about large houses with large kitchens and adequate space for a large and deep sink. Even some of my larger houses in Europe had what I considered to be small sinks, albeit they mostly had side-by-sinks (which were smaller than I'd like them to be). New kitchen fads in some parts of Europe seem to be all about getting rid of most of the kitchen counter space around the edge of the kitchen and even sometimes even from around the sinks. Can't say I like it or ever will. We don't have a Star Trek-like sci-fi food maker sparing us from using pots/pans and kitchen counters to prepare ingredients and more, and so the counter space is useful.



Indeed. These half-shower/tub doors of glass are in place in many a European bathroom that isn't even designed to be a wet room. The half shower/tub door thing seems to have been a product of design aesthetic, ability to transport and install/replace the doors cheaply, and to perhaps minimize water usage/cost at some point in time. They seem to be less common in new-built properties today than they used to be 10-25 years ago.
I mentioned upthread and someone else further explained, perhaps people dont' practice continuous, top-spray showers. Locally we see even in brand new construction where designers have freedom to route plumbing, the taps come from the side of the tub and/or the wand mount is attached to the side of the tub....


re: kitchen workspace, these are extensible via portable islands/benches/carts, which was our solution. small sinks though are fixed. absurd that we had to handwash larger oven racks and baking trays and etc by hand in the bathtub !!

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Old Nov 29, 18, 8:07 am
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Originally Posted by deniah View Post
I mentioned upthread and someone else further explained, perhaps people dont' practice continuous, top-spray showers. Locally we see even in brand new construction where designers have freedom to route plumbing, the taps come from the side of the tub and/or the wand mount is attached to the side of the tub....


re: kitchen workspace, these are extensible via portable islands/benches/carts, which was our solution. small sinks though are fixed. absurd that we had to handwash larger oven racks and baking trays and etc by hand in the bathtub !!

Most of the European bathrooms where I see the half-doors on the showers/tubs, the tap/faucet is not as in the above photo -- rather it is basically in the same place as is standard in the US and the shower head can be used as a handheld and/or is overhead much like it is in the US. But there are lots of buildings in Europe where pipes run along certain walls and moving/extending them to put fixtures elsewhere is avoided due to cost or other reasons and so the fixtures go in places that I consider to be less than ideal. It may have something to do more with sewage pipes/connections than even with clean water feeds.

I too have had to do the workaround of taking more pots and kitchen stuff for a wash in the bathrooms in Europe than I've ever had to do elsewhere.

Last edited by GUWonder; Nov 29, 18 at 8:15 am
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Old Nov 29, 18, 10:47 am
  #82  
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Originally Posted by deniah View Post
Ismall sinks though are fixed. absurd that we had to handwash larger oven racks and baking trays and etc by hand in the bathtub !!
Originally Posted by GUWonder View Post
I too have had to do the workaround of taking more pots and kitchen stuff for a wash in the bathrooms in Europe than I've ever had to do elsewhere.
I am puzzled by that. Yes, oven racks which are the width of my oven won't fit in the sink in the sense of being capable of being fully immersed but they can still be cleaned by putting them inclined in the sink and turning over as needed. It is not rocket science and certainly less hassle than cleaning them in the bath would be.

Oh well. we all have our own ways of doing things.
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Old Nov 29, 18, 11:14 am
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Originally Posted by NickB View Post
I am puzzled by that. Yes, oven racks which are the width of my oven won't fit in the sink in the sense of being capable of being fully immersed but they can still be cleaned by putting them inclined in the sink and turning over as needed. It is not rocket science and certainly less hassle than cleaning them in the bath would be.

Oh well. we all have our own ways of doing things.
Maybe you've got different scales of common appliances in the UK.
We're not talking about full submersion of e.g. a rack. Not even half immersion with half tilted in the basin. Due to dimensional constraints, including depth, we're talking only partial corner of a rectangle that can fit in said basin. That's twisting, and turning, and twisting, and turning

Here's a typical offering from major home supply store
https://www.obi.at/kueche/spuelen-spuelbecken/c/1139

Common external sizes there are 86x50 or 86x43cm... with typical basin dimensions of 34x34cm or so.

Anyway im glad to be done with the urban apartment life
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Old Nov 29, 18, 12:49 pm
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Originally Posted by enviroian View Post
Why move this to the Europe thread? Itís a very general topic.

Oh well. It will now die here.
...and you thought it would die here!
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Old Nov 29, 18, 4:12 pm
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Originally Posted by NickB View Post
I am puzzled by that. Yes, oven racks which are the width of my oven won't fit in the sink in the sense of being capable of being fully immersed but they can still be cleaned by putting them inclined in the sink and turning over as needed. It is not rocket science and certainly less hassle than cleaning them in the bath would be.

Oh well. we all have our own ways of doing things.
When using pots/pans that even may be on a scale of twice the width and/or depth of the sinks, washing them in the shower/bath may be faster, less trouble and less of a puddle-maker than playing contortion artist with a big pot/pan using a small sink.
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Old Nov 29, 18, 8:21 pm
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Originally Posted by enviroian View Post
WHY??

Glass rationing? For the last two days probably 4l of water hit the floor.

Absurd.
It's not rocket science ... learn to take a shower properly! You are not a 4-year old
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Old Nov 30, 18, 3:05 am
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Originally Posted by malgudi View Post
It's not rocket science ... learn to take a shower properly! You are not a 4-year old
Splashing water is part and parcel of showering properly. I don't know about everyone, but I don't know anyone who can take one properly with no splashing.

While the volume of splashed water getting beyond the shower/tub boundaries of sort may vary, water has a way of going where it goes when coming out at high pressure and coming into contact with solid resistance.

Given how the trend in European bathrooms has been to go increasingly toward wet-rooms, apparently splashing+ beyond the boundaries of the shower/tub is part and parcel of the adult experience.
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Old Nov 30, 18, 5:57 am
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Originally Posted by deniah View Post
re: kitchen workspace, these are extensible via portable islands/benches/carts, which was our solution. small sinks though are fixed. absurd that we had to handwash larger oven racks and baking trays and etc by hand in the bathtub !!

Yeah, we were looking at those for our recent house move, but thankfully, we ended up finding one with decent kitchen space. Do people just not cook any more?

Re: bungalows - yes, floors on house are to an extent driven by land cost (we have a lot less of it here in the UK, after all, and we do love a garden), but the benefits are there. I like the separation you get between living space and sleeping space, that you just don't get in many bungalows. I like the freedom you can give to an older child to do their own thing. And I like the exercise!
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Old Nov 30, 18, 1:42 pm
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[QUOTE=stut;30483053
Re: bungalows - yes, floors on house are to an extent driven by land cost (we have a lot less of it here in the UK, after all, and we do love a garden), but the benefits are there. I like the separation you get between living space and sleeping space, that you just don't get in many bungalows. I like the freedom you can give to an older child to do their own thing. And I like the exercise![/QUOTE]

I live in a Chicago-style bungalow, which are generally described as 1 1/2 floors. Ours has two bedrooms on the first floor (the ones from the original floor plan) and two in the built-out attic - the 1/2 floor. It's nifty because the teenager has his bedroom and bathroom to himself downstairs and the upstairs is ours. Plenty of space and privacy. Ours is considered a 'jumbo' bungalow though and it's pretty big. Way bigger than we need.
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Old Nov 30, 18, 5:35 pm
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Originally Posted by manda99 View Post
I live in a Chicago-style bungalow, which are generally described as 1 1/2 floors. Ours has two bedrooms on the first floor (the ones from the original floor plan) and two in the built-out attic - the 1/2 floor. It's nifty because the teenager has his bedroom and bathroom to himself downstairs and the upstairs is ours. Plenty of space and privacy. Ours is considered a 'jumbo' bungalow though and it's pretty big. Way bigger than we need.
Having had more than my fair share of stays in the country where the term bungalow first applied, I will take the liberty of claiming that a bungalow need not be limited to a single floor or 1.5 floors. There are double floor bungalows too and have been for at least nearly as long as the British had their Indian capital in Bengal. But single-floor bungalows are cheaper than those with more than one floor.
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