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London vs Paris for 2nd half of honeymoon

London vs Paris for 2nd half of honeymoon

Old Oct 25, 17, 12:52 pm
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London vs Paris for 2nd half of honeymoon

Hi Everyone,

Next July my fiance and I are going to Crete Greece for 5 nights to start our honeymoon. We then have 8 additional nights and we are debating between a trip based around London or Paris.

1-Paris: Would do 3-4 nights in wine country (or any surrounding area suggested, looking to avoid a huge city for this part) and then 4-5 nights in Paris.
2-London: not sure on the first 3-4 nights (somehwere in England/Scottland, Rhine River in Germany, again looking to avoid a huge city), then 4-5 nights in London.

We are really struggling to decide as both seem like amazing trips! For the nights in Paris/London I will be using marriott points for a great hotel.

Thank you all for any advice you can provide!
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Old Oct 25, 17, 1:26 pm
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Smile

My opinion is that London > Paris...except for a honeymoon. As un-romantic as I am, there's just something about sipping wine and watching the world go by in a Paris cafe.

Go to Paris. London will make a nice anniversary trip some day!

Edit - I have no idea how that smiley face showed up in the title...
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Old Oct 25, 17, 1:31 pm
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What about going 4 days to a French wine region (e.g. Champagne) and then to a lovely English/Scottish region and avoiding both cities?

Alternatively I'd just stick to France and work your way through it. Maybe a Nord-South route ending your trip with 1/2 days at the Riviera.
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Old Oct 26, 17, 4:29 pm
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What about doing both Paris and London, it's a 2 hour ride on Eurostar.
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Old Oct 26, 17, 10:09 pm
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We've decided on France! We have 8 nights, will be coming from Crete, Greece beforehand.

Trying to decide how to split the time between French Alps, Wine Country, and Paris (would like to see Normandy for a day from Paris as well). Don't know if we can hit all 3 or it would feel rushed.
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Old Oct 27, 17, 5:14 am
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Originally Posted by conner11 View Post
We've decided on France! We have 8 nights, will be coming from Crete, Greece beforehand.

Trying to decide how to split the time between French Alps, Wine Country, and Paris (would like to see Normandy for a day from Paris as well). Don't know if we can hit all 3 or it would feel rushed.
Given it's your honeymoon, I would second WorldLux's suggestion of a trip to the Champagne region. A meandering (not too drunken) drive around the vineyards, stopping in at whichever maisons take your fancy, is a great experience. You could base yourself in a grand chateau, a more rustic gite or alternatively/additionally a night or two in a nice hotel in Reims or Epernay.

That said, the other wine areas of France are also fantastic for a honeymoon too - it's hard not to enjoy!
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Old Nov 7, 17, 6:43 am
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hii,

I don't like the idea of having the honeymoon in metropoles, however Greece is great idea for honeymoon. I am sure you will enjoy it.
I would surely reccomend Paris after Greece. There are a lot of romantic places that you can visit together like the Temple of Love, The "I Love You" wall, or the Pont des Arts. YOu can use this as a guide: https://tripplannera.com/france-paris-trip-planner

Be sure not to overload your schedule as you would get rather tired than relaxed. You can choose between the French Alps and the Wine country. Also, there are day trips to Normandy like these ones: https://www.viator.com/Normandy/d183-ttd

However, all these together will make yoou rushed.
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Old Nov 7, 17, 7:53 am
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Originally Posted by Ldnn1 View Post
Given it's your honeymoon, I would second WorldLux's suggestion of a trip to the Champagne region. A meandering (not too drunken) drive around the vineyards, stopping in at whichever maisons take your fancy, is a great experience. You could base yourself in a grand chateau, a more rustic gite or alternatively/additionally a night or two in a nice hotel in Reims or Epernay.
Add my vote here as well. I would actually just do one overnight in the region (two full days) and spend the rest in Paris, but that's me. I don't live to drive for hours and get a little tired of wine tasting as an activity after two days. I prefer my wine in a Paris sidewalk cafe, with a nice restaurant within walking distance. Certainly depends on the OP's preferences though.
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Old Nov 8, 17, 4:48 pm
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I suggest you consider counting actual days spent IN places. As described, you appear to be doing what many people do and counting days that in fact will not exist as counted.

For example, if you leave Crete on day 5, you will not in fact spend the day in Crete. Nor will you spend it in France! It is a lost travel day. The same occurs each time you move. Even a move that entails only a couple of hours of actual travel time will cost you most of a day making the move.

People also tend to count their arrival and departure days as if they were days 'on the ground.'

So on a typical 2 week itinerary such as you describe, I count arrival, departure and moves as days not spent IN a place, they are days spent in BETWEEN places. If you lose your arrival day and departure day as well as making 3 moves, that is FIVE of your total of 14 days lost. That leaves you only 9 actual full days spent IN places.

The issue is a typical desire to 'see and do as much as possible' with the word 'much' being confused with the word 'many'. They are not synonymous. The way to see and do as much as possible, is to spend your time IN places. In travel as in many things, less is more. The less you move, the more you can see and do.

I find even the initial 5 days for Crete to be what I would consider a mistake. In fact, you will only have 3 days on Crete. The first and last are arrival/departure and basically lost days. You may get a few hours to use out of each but that isn't the same as a full day IN a place.

Crete alone could easily take up your entire 2 weeks. It could take up 2 months if you had the time. If you confined yourself to that, you would only lose 2 days, arrival/departure and have 12 full days IN places.

Quantity does not equal quality. You can see a little of a lot or a lot of a little. Most people mistakenly think a little of a lot is equal to a lot of a little. It isn't. You could go home knowing something about Crete or you can go home knowing very little about several places other than what the airports and hotels look like.
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Old Nov 8, 17, 11:39 pm
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Thanks everyone for the great advice.

To be more clear, we will get to our hotel in Crete late Monday night. 2 weeks later on Sunday morning we will fly out of Paris back to the US, so we have 12 full days (13 nights) before internal travel days.

For these 12 days, here is one option.
-4 full days in Crete (5 nights)
-1 travel day to France
-2 full days in France country (3 nights)
-0.5 travel day to Paris
-4.5 full days in Paris (5 nights)

I'm coming around that I should just pick one part of France to see before Paris, and not try to do wine country and the alps before going to Paris.

If we were to add another day and night to Crete, where do you suggest we take a day/night away from later on in the trip?

Originally Posted by dulciusexasperis View Post
I suggest you consider counting actual days spent IN places. As described, you appear to be doing what many people do and counting days that in fact will not exist as counted.

For example, if you leave Crete on day 5, you will not in fact spend the day in Crete. Nor will you spend it in France! It is a lost travel day. The same occurs each time you move. Even a move that entails only a couple of hours of actual travel time will cost you most of a day making the move.

People also tend to count their arrival and departure days as if they were days 'on the ground.'

So on a typical 2 week itinerary such as you describe, I count arrival, departure and moves as days not spent IN a place, they are days spent in BETWEEN places. If you lose your arrival day and departure day as well as making 3 moves, that is FIVE of your total of 14 days lost. That leaves you only 9 actual full days spent IN places.

The issue is a typical desire to 'see and do as much as possible' with the word 'much' being confused with the word 'many'. They are not synonymous. The way to see and do as much as possible, is to spend your time IN places. In travel as in many things, less is more. The less you move, the more you can see and do.

I find even the initial 5 days for Crete to be what I would consider a mistake. In fact, you will only have 3 days on Crete. The first and last are arrival/departure and basically lost days. You may get a few hours to use out of each but that isn't the same as a full day IN a place.

Crete alone could easily take up your entire 2 weeks. It could take up 2 months if you had the time. If you confined yourself to that, you would only lose 2 days, arrival/departure and have 12 full days IN places.

Quantity does not equal quality. You can see a little of a lot or a lot of a little. Most people mistakenly think a little of a lot is equal to a lot of a little. It isn't. You could go home knowing something about Crete or you can go home knowing very little about several places other than what the airports and hotels look like.
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Old Nov 9, 17, 11:14 am
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My rule of thumb is to never spend less than 3 full days/4 nights in any place unless it is just an overnight stop between A and B. Note the 'less than', it is a minimum I think it takes to really be able to see/do anything worthwhile. Most people would agree for example that you need more than 3 full days in a place like Paris, Rome, London, etc. unless you have little interest in what such places have to offer the traveller.

I know people say that for them, 'one day(or two) in X was enough'. It may well be but that means they are moving more and spending less time in total IN places. If I think a place will only hold my interest for a day, I skip it entirely unless I can do it as a day trip from somewhere I do expect to want to spend more than 3 days in.

My preferred method is to just go to A and stay until I am ready to leave. Then decide where to go next. Rinse and repeat until either the time available or the funds available run out and then go home. That only works if you are willing to wing it as you go however and most people aren't willing to do that based on their belief that it will cost them more. It may or may not (you might be surprised) but they believe it always will.

In your case, I would fly to Crete and wing it from there with the knowledge that I had a return ticket from Paris on X date. That return flight would be the only restriction on where I would go and when.

I approach travel as an adventure. An adventure however requires two things by definition, risk and the unknown. A tour on the other hand, whether booked through a tour company or self-booked (as in a pre-planned and pre-booked itinerary) is not an adventure, it's a tour plain and simple.

Pre-booking and itineraries put blinders on us to opportunities that can arise when we travel. I have seen first hand many examples of people who when presented with an opportunity say something like, 'oh, I'd love to do that BUT I have a hotel reservation; flight booked; etc. and I CAN'T do that.

Travel to me is about freedom. The freedom from everyday life and all the responsibilities we all have. We are conditioned to live with schedules. I have to be at work at 9am. I have to keep an appointment, etc. Vacation time to me is being able to get up in the morning and say, 'so what do I want to do today and where?' Move on, stay where I am, go somewhere someone suggested and I had never even heard of, all are possible UNLESS I lock myself in to a 'plan'.

I never understand why people want to throw that freedom away before they even leave home and plan everything ahead of time. There is no law that says you have to decide ahead of time whether to go to any given part of France etc.

Suppose you meet an Italian couple staying at the same hotel in Crete with whom you become friendly. Hearing you are on your honeymoon, they say, 'Ah for a honeymoon, nowhere is better than our home on the Amalfi Coast. Why don't you come stay with us this weekend?' Are you gonna say, 'Oh we'd love to BUT'.

You may find that example far fetched and perhaps it is, but such things do happen. You can be open to such opportunities or you can be on a tour. Your choice. I have heard a person first hand turn down an opportunity for free transportation and accommodation for the Running of the Bulls in Pamplona with just those words. I've also heard someone else say, 'I'm free to go, when do we leave.'

Or you may just find yourselves saying, 'oh we love it here on Crete, I WISH we could stay longer.' Well why can't you? All you would have to do is extend your hotel stay or find another hotel on another part of the island.

Dare to be adventurous. It's easier to expand your comfort zone than you may think it is.
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Old Nov 9, 17, 1:12 pm
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Originally Posted by dulciusexasperis View Post
Dare to be adventurous. It's easier to expand your comfort zone than you may think it is.
Some people prefer to do "honeymoon stuff" during their honeymoon as opposed to be adventurous.
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Old Nov 9, 17, 1:50 pm
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Originally Posted by WilcoRoger View Post
Some people prefer to do "honeymoon stuff" during their honeymoon as opposed to be adventurous.
The Hotel California in Paris has a lovely rooftop room away from the other hotel rooms that's perfect for "honeymoon stuff".

https://www.tripadvisor.com/ShowUser...de_France.html
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Old Nov 9, 17, 3:46 pm
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Originally Posted by WilcoRoger View Post
Some people prefer to do "honeymoon stuff" during their honeymoon as opposed to be adventurous.

Well yeah, but then you don't even have to leave home to do that do you.

If someone indicates an interest in going somewhere to see and do things outside of their hotel room, then I think suggesting they do something more adventurous than a typical pre-planned tour is not unreasonable.
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Old Nov 9, 17, 7:29 pm
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Originally Posted by dulciusexasperis View Post

I never understand why people want to throw that freedom away before they even leave home and plan everything ahead of time. There is no law that says you have to decide ahead of time whether to go to any given part of France etc.
I'm not a legal expert, but you're probably right .

I think what you're suggesting is fine for normal travel, but a honeymoon is a little different to most people. While you can go with the flow and have a laugh about mishaps and adventures on a normal vacation, it may be important to the OP and spouse that their vacation is well-planned. Maybe they miss out on a grand adventure, but on the other hand at least they don't end up spending hours scrambling to find a hotel room, or going way over budget because they didn't plan and pay for all their transportation in advance...and budget is typically important for a honeymoon where one tends to spend a little more on luxury than a typical vacation.

OP - I think the itinerary you posted looks fantastic! I'd point you back to earlier comments on where to spend the days outside Paris -- do a little research on the Champagne region and see what you think. Have a great trip!
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