Will the 777X be another 737MAX?

Old Apr 6, 19, 12:51 pm
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Will the 777X be another 737MAX?

Emirates has like 150 of the 777X on order. Will the overstretched 777X be another problematic 737 MAX ? Should Emirates have ordered more A380s or some 747-8s instead ?
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Old Apr 6, 19, 12:54 pm
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I do wish EK purchase more A380.

About 777x, I doubt the same mistake repeated again there.
737MAX fiasco will tighten the certification process and doubt Boeing will be dumb enough to repeat such fatal mistake.
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Old Apr 6, 19, 1:15 pm
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Originally Posted by kaizen7 View Post
I do wish EK purchase more A380.

About 777x, I doubt the same mistake repeated again there.
737MAX fiasco will tighten the certification process and doubt Boeing will be dumb enough to repeat such fatal mistake.
The first 777X was rolled out on March 13, 2019, so any issues from overstretching are already baked in. Just have to sit back and hope the certificaton process works this time.
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Old Apr 6, 19, 1:22 pm
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It's an entirely different aircraft with very different weight and balance characteristics. To compare the two is foolish. It's an anomaly of putting large engines on the 737 frame which is too low to the ground to fit the engines, the 777 already has massive engines in the previous versions and as a widebody is higher off the ground, as a longer and heavier aircraft in general it also is less susceptible to large center of gravity changes from just the engines having a longer arm.

Anyway, whatever software fix they come up with for the 737 would work for the 777 as well if it were the same issue (obviously adapted to the 777X's physics model). The 737MAX is not unsafe, it appears the software is faulty, and a fix for that would render the aircraft perfectly safe once again. All the fear mongering and sensationalism around the 737 MAX by amateur aviation analysts is rather annoying
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Old Apr 6, 19, 8:32 pm
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Pprune, the piolts rumor board has nearly 4,000 posts on the 737 MAX. Often fairly technical discussion. A few pprune posters raised questions about the 777x::

Quote:Originally Posted by Helix Von Smelix [img]file:///C:\Users\Schul\AppData\Local\Temp\msohtmlclip1\01\ clip_image001.gif[/img]Just looking at the Boeing 777-9 rollout photos. My question is, Have Boeing done a similar thing with the engine position on the 777-9 as they did with the 737-MAX? Forward and high.

They have actually lengthened the main gear legs to 16ft, the longest ever used on an airliner, but yes the diameter of the engine means that it does sit higher and farther forward.

Of course with the FBW 777 that should be less of a problem.

Trivium: the manufacturer of the 777X MLG, Héroux Devtek in Quebec, also supplied the legs for the Apollo Lunar Module.

Quote:Originally Posted by dinbangkok [img]file:///C:\Users\Schul\AppData\Local\Temp\msohtmlclip1\01\ clip_image001.gif[/img]Regardless of whether you're a pilot or not, surely the question that needs to be answered is simple: How is it remotely OK for Boeing (or any other manufacturer), to sell a passenger aircraft that needs software to correct an aerodynamic imbalance in the design of the aircraft (prone to pitching up)?

There are several exhibits of this out in the market: 777, 787, and soon to come 777X. These models all have full FBW systems that enable the bare airframe to have aerodynamic characteristics that with out any control system functionality at all would not be certifiable. The motivation is that these models have been able to design in improved performance because they have been able to take advantage of control system functions to yield certifiable handling qualities. The key, of course, is that the availability and reliability including any failure mode effects must be acceptable. Certification requirements cover all aspects of this.

I see Boeing have quietly rolled out a new B777 as well.

Did they fast track/fiddle that certification as well?
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Old Apr 6, 19, 8:43 pm
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Originally Posted by BF263533 View Post
Pprune, the piolts rumor board has nearly 4,000 posts on the 737 MAX. Often fairly technical discussion. A few pprune posters raised questions about the 777x::

Quote:Originally Posted by Helix Von Smelix [img]file:///C:\Users\Schul\AppData\Local\Temp\msohtmlclip1\01\ clip_image001.gifJust looking at the Boeing 777-9 rollout photos. My question is, Have Boeing done a similar thing with the engine position on the 777-9 as they did with the 737-MAX? Forward and high.

They have actually lengthened the main gear legs to 16ft, the longest ever used on an airliner, but yes the diameter of the engine means that it does sit higher and farther forward.

Of course with the FBW 777 that should be less of a problem.

Trivium: the manufacturer of the 777X MLG, Héroux Devtek in Quebec, also supplied the legs for the Apollo Lunar Module.

Quote:Originally Posted by dinbangkok [img]file:///C:\Users\Schul\AppData\Local\Temp\msohtmlclip1\01\ clip_image001.gifRegardless of whether you're a pilot or not, surely the question that needs to be answered is simple: How is it remotely OK for Boeing (or any other manufacturer), to sell a passenger aircraft that needs software to correct an aerodynamic imbalance in the design of the aircraft (prone to pitching up)?

There are several exhibits of this out in the market: 777, 787, and soon to come 777X. These models all have full FBW systems that enable the bare airframe to have aerodynamic characteristics that with out any control system functionality at all would not be certifiable. The motivation is that these models have been able to design in improved performance because they have been able to take advantage of control system functions to yield certifiable handling qualities. The key, of course, is that the availability and reliability including any failure mode effects must be acceptable. Certification requirements cover all aspects of this.

I see Boeing have quietly rolled out a new B777 as well.

Did they fast track/fiddle that certification as well?
Not sure which of those are quotes and which are your comments, but broadly speaking yes the engine appears further forward compared to the B77W, but that alone is not sufficient to say it has the same flaws. As I stated in my earlier reply the overall aircraft is significantly larger, heavier and weight and balance will be entirely different than the 737

It's like saying Airbus aircraft and Boeing aircraft both have wings, so they're the same.

I am familiar with pprune, and just because it is frequented (not exclusively) by professional pilots doesn't make it a reliable source of this type of information (neither is Flyertalk). I'm sure you're aware the R in PPRUNE stands for Rumour. It's speculation.

And that being said, pilots aren't the right people to ask anyway, you'd need to ask aeronautical engineers.

FWIW, I'm a private pilot so I do understand the physics behind aircraft w&b and COG. Some aircraft are intentionally designed to be unstable, and fighter jets are often unable to be flown without supporting software, so the concept of an aircraft depending on software to maintain maneuverability isn't new or unusual.
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Old Apr 6, 19, 9:28 pm
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I don't remember the details or the fix. I DO remember the 727 being grounded for awhile. This was years and years ago--after multiple accidents. I sincerely believe the same way Boeing recovered and the 727 flew until recently, the same will happen with the 737 MAX.
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Old Apr 7, 19, 12:25 am
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My concern would not at all be that the 77X has the same or even remotely similar design ‘flaws’ as the 737MAX. It is more that there appears to be a possibility (and with a clear accent on appears) that the registration authorities in the US could have aided Boeing to get this aircraft ready for flight too quickly for commercial reasons and that they might have done something similar for other new types.
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Old Apr 7, 19, 3:16 am
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Originally Posted by thijsseh View Post
My concern would not at all be that the 77X has the same or even remotely similar design ‘flaws’ as the 737MAX. It is more that there appears to be a possibility (and with a clear accent on appears) that the registration authorities in the US could have aided Boeing to get this aircraft ready for flight too quickly for commercial reasons and that they might have done something similar for other new types.
The 737MAX was self-certified by Boeing, which was enough for the FAA and other regulatory bodies around the world.

If it now needs to go through a formal certification process (which would seem likely), it won't be flying for months. However, I'd expect the FAA to speed through the process... Other regions won't be as keen to rush it through.
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Old Apr 7, 19, 4:36 am
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Originally Posted by skywardhunter View Post
All the fear mongering and sensationalism around the 737 MAX by amateur aviation analysts is rather annoying
Hundreds of people have died. It's not something to take lightly.
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Old Apr 7, 19, 4:50 am
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When the financial stuff comes before anything else then planes willl crash and people will die. Sort that out and the rest will take care of itself.
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Old Apr 7, 19, 5:15 am
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Originally Posted by THR View Post
Hundreds of people have died. It's not something to take lightly.
Who is taking it lightly? It is a very serious matter which is why speculation and fear mongering is exactly not appropriate. People are jumping to conclusions and people are going to be terrified to fly a 737 max even in a year's time when everything is resolved because of it. Now people are speculating, without any actual insider knowledge, that other, completely unrelated, aircraft models, with a different physical and architectural foundation, may suffer from the same issue... it's reckless.
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Old Apr 7, 19, 11:46 am
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Would LOVE for EK (and any other airline for that matter) to order some 748is, they're beautiful airplanes, and ensuring we can fly 747's for another 20 years would be super.
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Old Apr 7, 19, 5:30 pm
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Whatever software fix they come up with: it is not going to fix the fundamental structural instability problem of the 737 max..this is going to remain with this aircraft as long as its design is not changed...this will definitely not be resolved in a year or two. I am not an expert..but i am not aware of any other aircraft which has comparable structural faults causing instabilities which require to be addressed by a counterbalancing software..and I am not convinced by the FBW examples given above..there is a difference between an aeronautical instability and a design which systematically pushes this instability to the limit. I´d rather fly in an aircraft which just flies with the help of a skilled pilot. AFAIC, I will totally avoid the max in the future..and my trust in Boeing and the FAA is fundamentally disturbed..so I personally will give it quite some time before boarding a 777X.
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Last edited by homer3152; Apr 7, 19 at 5:39 pm
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Old Apr 7, 19, 8:39 pm
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Originally Posted by homer3152 View Post
Whatever software fix they come up with: it is not going to fix the fundamental structural instability problem of the 737 max..this is going to remain with this aircraft as long as its design is not changed...this will definitely not be resolved in a year or two. I am not an expert..but i am not aware of any other aircraft which has comparable structural faults causing instabilities which require to be addressed by a counterbalancing software..and I am not convinced by the FBW examples given above..there is a difference between an aeronautical instability and a design which systematically pushes this instability to the limit. I´d rather fly in an aircraft which just flies with the help of a skilled pilot. AFAIC, I will totally avoid the max in the future..and my trust in Boeing and the FAA is fundamentally disturbed..so I personally will give it quite some time before boarding a 777X.
This is all a bit misleading, the software that is at issue, MCAS, is not permanently in use, it addresses a very specific scenario, based on load speed, temperature and most importantly angle of attack.
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