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Consolidated "What's for Thanksgiving Dinner - Questions/Recommendations" thread

Consolidated "What's for Thanksgiving Dinner - Questions/Recommendations" thread

Old Nov 23, 04, 8:35 am
  #1  
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Consolidated "What's for Thanksgiving Dinner - Questions/Recommendations" thread

I found a recipe in the paper for a creamed spinach and carmelized onion casserole. (We love spinach at our house) and my sister is bringing mashed sweet potatos with pecan topping.
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Old Nov 23, 04, 8:38 am
  #2  
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Originally Posted by missydarlin
I found a recipe in the paper for a creamed spinach and carmelized onion casserole.
That sounds delicious!! Care to share that recipe?
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Old Nov 23, 04, 9:09 am
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Everyone at our gathering (almost) is assigned a dish to bring and it's always the same tried and true recipes we grew up with. I bring corn pudding, my sister and I make the turkey (deep fried), she also makes the dressing, gravy and pies. My mother brings sweet potato souffle and mashed potatoes. My aunt brings cranberry salad and my brother and his wife are in charge of breads and rolls. We ask my cousin and his wife not to cook.

I think if anyone deviated from their assigned recipes, he/she would be relegated to the cold back yard for dinner.
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Old Nov 23, 04, 9:57 am
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Originally Posted by Analise
That sounds delicious!! Care to share that recipe?

I'll copy and post it when I get home tonight
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Old Nov 23, 04, 10:07 am
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Originally Posted by janey
My mother brings sweet potato souffle.
Any way you can convince your mom to part with this recipe?

Mary
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Old Nov 23, 04, 11:28 am
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Molasses-brined Turkey With Gingersnap Gravy

Brining ensures moist, succulent meat, and this recipe from Bruce Aidells, chef and founder of Aidells Sausage Company, could not be easier or more low-tech. The special equipment required? Two 30-gallon plastic bags and one very large (16-quart) bowl that will fit in the fridge. You'll want to get started a day ahead, because the turkey is brined for 18 to 20 hours. Stuffing this turkey is not recommended; the brine remaining in the meat may soak into the stuffing during roasting.

Ingredients
Stock
5 cups low-salt chicken broth
2 medium carrots, chopped
2 large celery stalks, chopped
1 onion, halved
2 small bay leaves
Neck, heart, and gizzard reserved from 18- to 20-pound turkey

Brine and turkey
1 18- to 20-pound turkey
7 quarts water
2 cups coarse salt (about 9 ounces)
1 cup (packed) dark brown sugar
1 cup mild-flavored (light) molasses
2 bunches fresh thyme
1 bunch fresh sage
2 quarts ice cubes

2 large onions, halved
1 head of garlic, halved horizontally
3 tablespoons olive oil
1 tablespoon ground black pepper
1 tablespoon chopped fresh thyme
1 tablespoon chopped fresh sage

4 cups (about) low-salt chicken broth

Gravy
1 cup finely chopped onion
1 tablespoon chopped fresh thyme
20 gingersnap cookies, coarsely crumbled (about 1 3/4 cups)
3 to 4 tablespoons apple cider vinegar
1 teaspoon Worcestershire sauce
1/4 cup whipping cream (optional)

Preparation
For stock:
Combine broth, carrots, celery, onion, and bay leaves in large saucepan. Add reserved neck, heart, and gizzard. Bring to boil; reduce heat to medium-low and simmer until stock is reduced to 3 1/4 cups, about 1 hour. Strain turkey stock into medium bowl. (Can be made 1 day ahead. Cover stock and refrigerate.)

For brine and turkey:
Line very large (about 16-quart) bowl with two 30-gallon plastic bags, one inside the other. Rinse turkey inside and out. Place turkey in plastic-lined bowl. Combine 7 quarts water, salt, sugar, molasses, 1 bunch thyme, and 1/2 bunch sage in large bowl or pot. Stir until salt and sugar dissolve. Mix in ice cubes. Pour brine over turkey in plastic bags. Gather tops of bags together, eliminating air space above brine; seal bags. Refrigerate turkey in brine 18 to 20 hours.

Set rack at lowest position in oven and preheat to 350°F. Remove turkey from brine. Drain very well; discard brine. Pat turkey dry inside and out. Place turkey on small rack set in large roasting pan. Fill main cavity with remaining 1 bunch thyme and 1/2 bunch sage, onions, and garlic. Stir oil, pepper, chopped thyme, and chopped sage in small bowl to form paste; smear all over outside of turkey. Tuck wing tips under; tie legs together loosely to hold shape.

Roast turkey 1 hour, tenting loosely with foil if browning quickly. Turn pan around; roast turkey 30 minutes. Pour 1 cup broth over turkey; re-tent loosely with foil. Roast turkey, basting with 1 cup broth every 30 minutes until thermometer inserted into thickest part of thigh registers 175°F, about 2 hours longer. Transfer turkey to platter. Remove vegetables and herbs from main cavity and discard. Spoon any juices from cavity into roasting pan. Let turkey stand 30 minutes (internal temperature will increase 5 to 10 degrees).

For gravy:
Strain pan juices into bowl. Spoon off fat, reserving 2 tablespoons. Heat reserved 2 tablespoons turkey fat in heavy large saucepan over medium-high heat. Add onion and thyme. Sauté until onion browns, about 10 minutes. Add turkey stock, gingersnaps, 3 tablespoons cider vinegar, and Worcestershire sauce. Add 2 cups degreased pan juices and bring to boil, whisking to dissolve gingersnaps. Reduce heat to medium-low and simmer until gravy thickens, about 4 minutes. Season gravy to taste with salt and pepper, adding remaining tablespoon vinegar and cream, if desired.

Serve turkey with gravy.

Makes 12 to 14 servings.
Bon Appétit

November 2002
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Old Nov 23, 04, 11:55 am
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Originally Posted by Mary2e
Any way you can convince your mom to part with this recipe?

Mary
As a matter of fact, I just got the recipe this morning to share with some co-workers. Here it is:

1 (1#) can sweet potatoes
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/4 teaspoon cinnamon
1/4 teaspoon nutmeg
1/4 cup butter
2 eggs
1 teaspoon vanilla
1/2 cup sugar

Whip these together and put in a buttered casserole dish.

Topping:
1/4 cup soft butter
3/4 cup brown sugar
3 tablespoons flour
1/2 cup chopped pecans

Mix together topping ingredients and sprinkle on top of sweet potato mixture. Bake at 350 for 30-40 minutes.

Note: This recipe makes a very small amount. When increasing the recipe you need to adjust the butter and eggs or it gets very soupy and doesn't bake right. My mother makes 4X this recipe and uses about 3/4 cup of butter and 3 eggs in the sweet potato mixture. She says you might want to adjust the sugar as well.)
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Old Nov 23, 04, 11:58 am
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Thanks Janey. I appreciate it. Has anyone tried to make it with fresh sweet potatoes?

The reason I ask is because I thought I'd make a sweet potato pie for my dad and bought the ingredients, and I just found out he doesn't like it as a dessert. I'd like to use the stuff I have.

If not, maybe I'll just experiment.

Thanks again.

Mary
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Old Nov 23, 04, 12:07 pm
  #9  
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I was going to make bluestate stew

but....
it's too bitter for me
it lacked substance (nothing really to hold it together)
has to be made with whine
it is served raw
it didn't appear to have a future


Last edited by underpressure; Nov 23, 04 at 12:39 pm
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Old Nov 23, 04, 8:58 pm
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Creamed Spinach-Carmelized Onion Casserole

5 Tbs butter, divided
2 lg onions, thinly sliced
salt
1 cup dry white wine, divided
6 thyme sprigs
1 cup heavy cream
3 cloves garlic, smashed
4 (10oz) bags baby spinach
salt
2 large pinches ground nutmeg
1 cup breadcrumbs (homemade soft recommended)
1 1/2 c grated cheddar cheese (I plan on using a mix of white cheeses)
1 Tbs fresh thyme finely chopped


In a large skillet over medium heat, melt 3 Tbs butter. Add onions and 1 1/2 tsp salt. Saute onions until they begin to turn translucent. Add 1/2 cup wine and thyme sprigs, reduce heat to medium low, cover and cook 30 minutes, stirring occasionally. Increase heat to medium, uncover and add remaining 1/2 cup wine. Cook for 20 to 30 minutes until onions begin to brown. Listen for the sizzle, then stir more frequently so they don't burn. Onions are done when they have a rich golden color and jammy consistency. Remove thyme sprigs and set onions aside.

Meanwhile, prehat the oven to 375 degrees.

Heat cream with garlic just until it begins to simmer. Turn off heat and set aside.

Wash two bags spinach leaves in a large colander but don't dry them. Put the leaves in a wide soup pot with water still clinging to the leaves. Add 1/4 tsp salt and cook over high heat, turning occasionally untl the leaves wilt and turn bright green, about 4 to 6 minutes. Return the spinach to the colander and, using a wooden spoon, squeeze out the excess liquid. Finely chop the spinach. Repeat with the remaining two bags.

In a large skillet or pot, melt the remaining 2 Tbs butter. Over high heat, add the spinach and cook until the excess water in the spinach evaporates. Pour cream through a strainer directly into pan and simmer until it thickens slightly. Add nutmeg and stir in carmelized onions.

Transfer to a 2-quart casserole or gratin dish.

Combine breadcrumbs, cheese, and thyme. Spread evenly over spinach. Bake for 25 minutes or until top is golden.
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Old Nov 23, 04, 9:40 pm
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I've convinced someone to try and make Thai-style panang turkey.
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Old Nov 23, 04, 10:26 pm
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We tried Susan Stamberg's mother's cranberry relish recipe one year - let's just say it was unusual.

We're sticking with the tried and true this year,
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Old Nov 25, 04, 10:51 pm
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Thumbs up Great recipes!

Thank you missydarlin and janey for the 2 new recipes!! We loved them both! I love to cook, so it was perfect timing to try something new for the family.
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Old Nov 26, 04, 7:00 am
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I altered my recipe a bit, using frozen chopped spinach, and 5 blend "italian" grated cheese (all white). It was a big hit, but I dont know that I'll bother to spend an HOUR carmelizing onions next time. I think I'll chop and saute them (just not for an hour) ..maybe add some mushrooms.

Infusing the cream with garlic was definitely a trick I'll try again.
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Old Nov 26, 04, 8:45 am
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Originally Posted by GUWonder
I've convinced someone to try and make Thai-style panang turkey.
How was it?
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