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No Dairy, No Gluten, No Food?

No Dairy, No Gluten, No Food?

Old Jul 10, 18, 12:29 pm
  #91  
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Originally Posted by SusanDK View Post
For breakfast, how about some chilled steamed asparagus spears wrapped in smoked salmon? You can prepare the night before and take with you to work. Steam the asparagus in the microwave (have some for dinner), then when wrapping up the leftovers after dinner, wrap some in a slice or two of smoked salmon and keep in the fridge until morning. Take along to work.

Make some tuna salad with chopped onions, chopped celery, dijon mustard, dill, capers, salt & pepper and divide it into individual serving plastic containers.

I always prepared my breakfast and lunch that I carried with me to work the night before while I was cleaning up the kitchen from dinner.

For breakfast at home on the weekend - smash a ripe banana and mix with two eggs (blend with a fork until well-mixed), then cook like you would pancakes. No flour / grains and tastes wonderful like a banana pancake. Before serving top with fresh blueberries and sprinkle with cinnamon. You can also make the "pancakes" with banana, eggs and oatmeal but then need to blend in a blender or food processor.

Smash a ripe banana and add around a cup of uncooked oatmeal, blend so you can form into balls to make cookies. Place on a baking sheet and bake in the oven (I can't remember how long, but I think around 15 minutes at 350F or so). Fast, easy two-ingredient cookies for snacks that are gluten, dairy and nut free. You can also add raisins, cinnamon or other desired ingredients. Takes no time to whip up a batch that you'll have for many days.
I'm not a fan of smoked salmon. Plus, that's a little expensive.

I like most of my coworkers. I wouldn't want to torture them with tuna.
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Old Jul 10, 18, 1:10 pm
  #92  
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Originally Posted by kipper View Post
I'm not a fan of smoked salmon. Plus, that's a little expensive.

I like most of my coworkers. I wouldn't want to torture them with tuna.
Yeah, but you have to admit 2 ingredient cookies are brilliant. You just make a huge batch and have breakfast for weeks.

Plus I personally like the idea of pancakes made from just bananas and eggs. At least until I try it.
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Old Jul 10, 18, 1:15 pm
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Originally Posted by BamaVol View Post
Yeah, but you have to admit 2 ingredient cookies are brilliant. You just make a huge batch and have breakfast for weeks.

Plus I personally like the idea of pancakes made from just bananas and eggs. At least until I try it.
Try it! I think you will be surprised how good they are. Especially with the blueberries or strawberries on top. My husband is a fan and I've also served them to overnight guests for breakfast who were very impressed.
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Old Jul 10, 18, 1:20 pm
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Can you eat peanuts? They aren't technically nuts. What about hummus? Lots of protein in beans of all types. Rice crackers don't have gluten. Soy milk? Tofu?
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Old Jul 10, 18, 3:10 pm
  #95  
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Originally Posted by BamaVol View Post
Yeah, but you have to admit 2 ingredient cookies are brilliant. You just make a huge batch and have breakfast for weeks.

Plus I personally like the idea of pancakes made from just bananas and eggs. At least until I try it.
They are brilliant. I may try them.
Originally Posted by picturegal View Post
Can you eat peanuts? They aren't technically nuts. What about hummus? Lots of protein in beans of all types. Rice crackers don't have gluten. Soy milk? Tofu?
I can't eat peanuts. I dislike hummus, I think because as a child, I had a lot of allergies to most legumes and would get sick if I did eat them.

I have to be careful with soy milk, as most won't guarantee it hasn't been cross-contaminated.

I hate tofu. That stems from having a vegetarian sister who has tried to convince me to eat tofurky instead of turkey and similar.
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Old Jul 10, 18, 4:15 pm
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Lightbulb

I must chime in here, since I'm married to a celiac (and guess who does the cooking?). We travel 100,000 miles a year, if that is any qualification.

I'm afraid to say that you need a regular date with kitchen appliances, as the best way to combat your dietary limitation is to prepare your own food and taking the time to do so, before you travel. As my wife says, trust NO ONE when it comes to cooking your food (and believe me I had to pass her "certification"). We only stay in places that have kitchens. Hyatt Houses, Residence Inns, AirBnB (for more exotic places). It makes a world of difference in our experience (because when one gets glutened, the partner suffers too).

It seems that if you switch to paleo or Whole30 diet, which is gluten free, soy free and legume free, you should be able to make your travel planning a lot easier. I understand there's not a Whole Foods Market everywhere you go (but if you do travel nationally, try to research a comparable upscale supermarket that would carry paleo products) but a little research helps. Also, certain countries are much better in catering your condition than others. Hint: my wife never got 'poisoned' in New Zealand and Australia, but she tend to get it when she travels to the South (of U.S.).. I also hear Italy has a lot of celiacs, so they cater accordingly. Learn the word 'celiac' in various languages by the way (this was thru experience!).

In any case, here's my wife's breakfast:
- 1 sliced banana + 3 eggs (scramble them). If you have casein issue, eggs may be a problem I understand. Slice half an apple thinly and serve with the eggs. My wife doesn't have nut allergy so she would drizzle organic almond butter on her breakfast, you might need to find an alternative flavoring here. Unsweetened organic shredded coconut flakes also add some fun to your breakfast; but the apple and banana mixed in should help you feel full.
- If she feels like splurging, paleo (sugar-free) bacon.
-1 coffee + Bulletproof Octane Oil (yes, they sell travel size). She swears this helps with celiac symptoms and alertness (i.e. so she doesn't get glutened accidentally).

If she is running late, RXBAR and Quest bars are gluten free and they provide a very quick fix till the next meal; but I understand some of these have nuts unfortunately.

For lunch, homemade chicken wings does wonder. Throw frozen ones in a big crockpot, melt Frank's Hot Sauce (GF), Coconut Aminos (GF/paleo/soy-free replacement for soy sauce), butter, paprika,salt/pepper, onion powder, leave overnight.... then throw them in the oven (or a Breville smart oven, if you have one of those). Don't be surprised if I say sometimes we pack our own Breville when luggage allows.

For prevention, she takes something called Inflammacore, which helps reduce "glutening" symptoms. It's a water-soluble powder format. (be careful packing powder in non-checked bags when you travel however, per the latest TSA stupidity).

And what if you accidentally get "glutened"? Try some Bulletproof Coconut Charcoal pills, if GI issue is how your body respond to being glutened.

BTW - everything I mentioned above can be found on Amazon. Disclaimer: I don't get paid by Amazon, and try these tips *before* you travel, obviously, not when you're stranded overseas. None of these are cheap, but they're worth it.

My wife also swears by this treatment called NAET which (depending on which state you live in) have a few practitioners. We have good recommendation for someone in the San Francisco bay area, if you feel compelled to try. It sounds voodoo (if you read up on it), but it actually works.

Oh and since our daughter had peanut allergy (lucky us!), we underwent treatment here: socalfoodallergy.org. Guy has 100% success rate and yes my daughter can now eat peanuts. He might treat adults too.

Again, I'm not being compensated for saying any of these.

Best of luck! PM if you have further questions.

Jim
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Old Jul 11, 18, 5:35 am
  #97  
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Originally Posted by Jamester View Post
I must chime in here, since I'm married to a celiac (and guess who does the cooking?). We travel 100,000 miles a year, if that is any qualification.

I'm afraid to say that you need a regular date with kitchen appliances, as the best way to combat your dietary limitation is to prepare your own food and taking the time to do so, before you travel. As my wife says, trust NO ONE when it comes to cooking your food (and believe me I had to pass her "certification"). We only stay in places that have kitchens. Hyatt Houses, Residence Inns, AirBnB (for more exotic places). It makes a world of difference in our experience (because when one gets glutened, the partner suffers too).

It seems that if you switch to paleo or Whole30 diet, which is gluten free, soy free and legume free, you should be able to make your travel planning a lot easier. I understand there's not a Whole Foods Market everywhere you go (but if you do travel nationally, try to research a comparable upscale supermarket that would carry paleo products) but a little research helps. Also, certain countries are much better in catering your condition than others. Hint: my wife never got 'poisoned' in New Zealand and Australia, but she tend to get it when she travels to the South (of U.S.).. I also hear Italy has a lot of celiacs, so they cater accordingly. Learn the word 'celiac' in various languages by the way (this was thru experience!).

In any case, here's my wife's breakfast:
- 1 sliced banana + 3 eggs (scramble them). If you have casein issue, eggs may be a problem I understand. Slice half an apple thinly and serve with the eggs. My wife doesn't have nut allergy so she would drizzle organic almond butter on her breakfast, you might need to find an alternative flavoring here. Unsweetened organic shredded coconut flakes also add some fun to your breakfast; but the apple and banana mixed in should help you feel full.
- If she feels like splurging, paleo (sugar-free) bacon.
-1 coffee + Bulletproof Octane Oil (yes, they sell travel size). She swears this helps with celiac symptoms and alertness (i.e. so she doesn't get glutened accidentally).

If she is running late, RXBAR and Quest bars are gluten free and they provide a very quick fix till the next meal; but I understand some of these have nuts unfortunately.

For lunch, homemade chicken wings does wonder. Throw frozen ones in a big crockpot, melt Frank's Hot Sauce (GF), Coconut Aminos (GF/paleo/soy-free replacement for soy sauce), butter, paprika,salt/pepper, onion powder, leave overnight.... then throw them in the oven (or a Breville smart oven, if you have one of those). Don't be surprised if I say sometimes we pack our own Breville when luggage allows.

For prevention, she takes something called Inflammacore, which helps reduce "glutening" symptoms. It's a water-soluble powder format. (be careful packing powder in non-checked bags when you travel however, per the latest TSA stupidity).

And what if you accidentally get "glutened"? Try some Bulletproof Coconut Charcoal pills, if GI issue is how your body respond to being glutened.

BTW - everything I mentioned above can be found on Amazon. Disclaimer: I don't get paid by Amazon, and try these tips *before* you travel, obviously, not when you're stranded overseas. None of these are cheap, but they're worth it.

My wife also swears by this treatment called NAET which (depending on which state you live in) have a few practitioners. We have good recommendation for someone in the San Francisco bay area, if you feel compelled to try. It sounds voodoo (if you read up on it), but it actually works.

Oh and since our daughter had peanut allergy (lucky us!), we underwent treatment here: socalfoodallergy.org. Guy has 100% success rate and yes my daughter can now eat peanuts. He might treat adults too.

Again, I'm not being compensated for saying any of these.

Best of luck! PM if you have further questions.

Jim
Thanks! I think the nut allergy and my desire to have a quick, no dishes, no fuss breakfast complicates things. I've looked into the tolerance idea for nuts, but even if I did that, I think mentally, I still couldn't eat nuts.

I'll definitely look into that breakfast for a weekend breakfast.
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Old Jul 11, 18, 11:56 am
  #98  
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After my visit with the dietitian, I received a link for a survey on my satisfaction with my visit. I'm assuming she didn't have control of if I received a survey, or I wouldn't have. I took the survey, and received a follow up call from the head of the nutrition department (or whatever department it is). I finally took the time to chat with her today, and I acknowledged that I'm challenging with my allergies, sensitivities, food dislikes, and life. I did point out that I've learned more here than I did at my visit, and that I felt as if she was simply googling things for me to try, while I was there.
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Old Jul 11, 18, 2:02 pm
  #99  
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Originally Posted by Jamester View Post

In any case, here's my wife's breakfast:
- 1 sliced banana + 3 eggs (scramble them). If you have casein issue, eggs may be a problem I understand. Slice half an apple thinly and serve with the eggs. My wife doesn't have nut allergy so she would drizzle organic almond butter on her breakfast, you might need to find an alternative flavoring here.
kipper, can you eat sunflower seeds? They make sunbutter. I find it a little bland compared to almond or peanut butter, but then I don't have to worry about nuts.

Last edited by BamaVol; Jul 11, 18 at 2:28 pm
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Old Jul 11, 18, 3:53 pm
  #100  
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Originally Posted by BamaVol View Post
kipper, can you eat sunflower seeds? They make sunbutter. I find it a little bland compared to almond or peanut butter, but then I don't have to worry about nuts.
I have been told I should try it, but I've also been told it tastes a lot like peanut butter, so I was cautioned that I may have issues with the taste.
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Old Jul 12, 18, 6:51 am
  #101  
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Originally Posted by kipper View Post
I have been told I should try it, but I've also been told it tastes a lot like peanut butter, so I was cautioned that I may have issues with the taste.
I find it saltier than peanut butter and don't think they're similar in taste, at least the three brands I've tried. I have a friend who hates peanut butter. I got her to try sunbutter and she discovered it was the texture of both that bothers her.
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Old Jul 12, 18, 10:17 am
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Originally Posted by BamaVol View Post
I find it saltier than peanut butter and don't think they're similar in taste, at least the three brands I've tried. I have a friend who hates peanut butter. I got her to try sunbutter and she discovered it was the texture of both that bothers her.
Interesting. Perhaps I'll try it then.
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Old Jul 12, 18, 6:54 pm
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Originally Posted by kipper View Post
Apparently, I have a sensitivity to both gluten and dairy. My PCP recommended I avoid both. I'm so confused about what I can eat other than meats, veggies, and fruit, because, in addition to this, I'm allergic to all nuts. I'd normally eat yogurt for breakfast, because it's quick, I can grab it from the fridge, take it to work, and eat at my desk. Now, I know I need a different breakfast, but I have no idea of what that can be, other than fruit (which doesn't give me protein). My requirements are that it must be extremely quick and easy, can be prepared or easily transported to work, and doesn't leave dishes in the morning. Adding to it, I hate things like hard-boiled eggs. Suggestions? Solutions?
You didn't contact me?

First, it will help greatly if you stop thinking of breakfast in terms of traditional breakfast foods and switch to "breakfast is the first meal of the day".

Breakfast protein: remember the meat market in Lancaster? Their beef sticks and meat sticks are GF, ask about dairy, but I don't recall it on the ingredient list. Wegman's breakfast sausage is a staple around here, again, check the label for dairy. Tuna: make a tuna salad the night before, spread it on toast or a bagel.

Oatmeal: the only one I trust is Cream Hill Estates, I buy it from Amazon. It's best slow cooked, but can be microwaved.

GF, dairy-free and nut-free baked goods: Katz Gluten-free Bakery. Bread (not my favorite, but not bad), donuts (entirely too tasty), bagels, cookies, pastries. They ship frozen from NYC area, I order in bulk, stock the basement freezer, use over 2 to 3 months.

Udi's plain bagels, blueberry muffins, lemon muffins: GF, DF, NF. At Target or Wegman's.

Better tasting to us breads: Glutino white bread is GF, DF, NF. Whole Foods own GF product line bread is decent. In the mood to bake? I can send you recipes.

Say you get GF/DF/NF bagels or English muffins, then what? We buy CostCo spiral sliced hams, cut the whole thing up, package for the freezer so I can get just a slice or two out at a time to put on a bagel. CostCo also has GF Canadian Bacon slices that are exactly bagel sized, very convenient. Toast the bagel, nuke the slice for 15 seconds, breakfast is ready. Now there are a number of non-dairy, non-nut spreads available, like the avocado spread my kid is currently into. I forget, can you eat coconut based products?

Hummus and dip-ables also work for breakfast on the go. Crackers, veggies sliced the night before.

If you want a hot breakfast, try Amy's frozen meals. Many are both GF and vegan/non-dairy.

Someone mentioned Schar gluten-free products. We've tried them in Europe and the US and we consider them inedible, except for one or two of their cookies. Ener-G is GF, DF, very trustworthy but the bread is bland. Their cookies aren't bad.
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Old Jul 12, 18, 7:11 pm
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Originally Posted by BamaVol View Post
Yeah, but you have to admit 2 ingredient cookies are brilliant. You just make a huge batch and have breakfast for weeks.

Plus I personally like the idea of pancakes made from just bananas and eggs. At least until I try it.
You need to add pureed butternut squash for the full experience.

I've made pancakes from just about every recipe sans gluten. Some are good, some are a little odd, and some even the squirrels and raccoons won't eat.
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Old Jul 12, 18, 8:14 pm
  #105  
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Originally Posted by CDTraveler View Post
You didn't contact me?

First, it will help greatly if you stop thinking of breakfast in terms of traditional breakfast foods and switch to "breakfast is the first meal of the day".

Breakfast protein: remember the meat market in Lancaster? Their beef sticks and meat sticks are GF, ask about dairy, but I don't recall it on the ingredient list. Wegman's breakfast sausage is a staple around here, again, check the label for dairy. Tuna: make a tuna salad the night before, spread it on toast or a bagel.

Oatmeal: the only one I trust is Cream Hill Estates, I buy it from Amazon. It's best slow cooked, but can be microwaved.

GF, dairy-free and nut-free baked goods: Katz Gluten-free Bakery. Bread (not my favorite, but not bad), donuts (entirely too tasty), bagels, cookies, pastries. They ship frozen from NYC area, I order in bulk, stock the basement freezer, use over 2 to 3 months.

Udi's plain bagels, blueberry muffins, lemon muffins: GF, DF, NF. At Target or Wegman's.

Better tasting to us breads: Glutino white bread is GF, DF, NF. Whole Foods own GF product line bread is decent. In the mood to bake? I can send you recipes.

Say you get GF/DF/NF bagels or English muffins, then what? We buy CostCo spiral sliced hams, cut the whole thing up, package for the freezer so I can get just a slice or two out at a time to put on a bagel. CostCo also has GF Canadian Bacon slices that are exactly bagel sized, very convenient. Toast the bagel, nuke the slice for 15 seconds, breakfast is ready. Now there are a number of non-dairy, non-nut spreads available, like the avocado spread my kid is currently into. I forget, can you eat coconut based products?

Hummus and dip-ables also work for breakfast on the go. Crackers, veggies sliced the night before.

If you want a hot breakfast, try Amy's frozen meals. Many are both GF and vegan/non-dairy.

Someone mentioned Schar gluten-free products. We've tried them in Europe and the US and we consider them inedible, except for one or two of their cookies. Ener-G is GF, DF, very trustworthy but the bread is bland. Their cookies aren't bad.
No, breakfast to me is a traditional breakfast. We have no room in either freezer.
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