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Why Pad Thai in US taste sweet?

Why Pad Thai in US taste sweet?

Old Aug 2, 15, 2:21 am
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Why Pad Thai in US taste sweet?

Love going to Europe to enjoy their pastries and biscuits/cookies because they are not as sweet as in the U.S.
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Old Aug 2, 15, 3:05 am
  #17  
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To see Americans buying and enjoying orange chicken with rice at Panda Express, Yuck!
Such a sweet dish ! lol!

I love spicy savory taste! Not only that, I add more chilly or hot sauce.
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Old Aug 2, 15, 4:05 am
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Originally Posted by bensyd View Post
+1.

Everything in America tastes sweet to me.
That's probably why there are so many obese Americans.
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Old Aug 2, 15, 7:17 am
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We don't have any chain Asian locally, but quite a number of Thai, Korean, Philippine, Vietnamese and Chinese restaurants. The Chinese places are all over the map and hard to talk about collectively. I suppose that's good as it allows you to find the one that matches your taste. I would agree that in general, their food is far sweeter than "American" dishes. Even our Thai restaurants, although owned and operated by folks from Thailand, tend to be sweet. It's surprising, since my theory is that they cater to the 2 local military bases where I would expect patrons to know what the real thing tastes like. Interesting observation on the part of the OP. I hadn't considered it until now. I may just have to try a few new places to see what I can find.

BTW, not all European countries leave out the sugar. I challenge anyone to eat a weeks worth of dessert in Vienna without the urge to make a dentist appointment upon returning home.
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Old Aug 2, 15, 1:18 pm
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Originally Posted by BamaVol View Post

BTW, not all European countries leave out the sugar. I challenge anyone to eat a weeks worth of dessert in Vienna without the urge to make a dentist appointment upon returning home.
Sugar where sugar belongs. A loaf of bread should not be sweet, but almost all US bread is horribly sweet, unless you buy the "artisan" type which would just be ordinary bread in other parts of the world.
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Old Aug 2, 15, 1:26 pm
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Originally Posted by Blueskyheaven View Post
The first time I tried the famous Thai Dish Pad Thai was in Khao San Road in Bangkok. It was sold on the streets and it tasted so good and fresh.

But when I later tried it in US, in some small restaurants and at PF Changs and Pei Wei, they taste very different and they taste sweet. I hated it.

The one I tried and loved in BKK didn't taste sweet.


Any idea why it is different?
I wouldn't call PF Chang a restaurant, and I wouldn't call the stuff they serve food.
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Old Aug 2, 15, 5:52 pm
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Originally Posted by bensyd View Post
Sugar where sugar belongs. A loaf of bread should not be sweet, but almost all US bread is horribly sweet, unless you buy the "artisan" type which would just be ordinary bread in other parts of the world.
As somebody that loves bread, and being in the SF Bay Area where sourdough comes from, I just never noticed any of the breads I eat having the slightest bit of sugar.
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Old Aug 2, 15, 7:29 pm
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Originally Posted by whimike View Post
As somebody that loves bread, and being in the SF Bay Area where sourdough comes from, I just never noticed any of the breads I eat having the slightest bit of sugar.
Most Americans don't. Sugar is pervasive in the American diet. To a foreigner it seems as though everything is sweetened. Even at higher end restaurants food often still has a certain sweetness to it.

Sourdough comes from San Francisco? That's a new one!

Last edited by bensyd; Aug 2, 15 at 7:37 pm
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Old Aug 2, 15, 8:31 pm
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Originally Posted by Gamecock View Post
Just a bit off topic, as an American of German descent who has spent 15 years in Germany, I am always amused by Americans who complain about German cakes and pastries tasting bland.

To me they have a delicate sweetness that is far better than the sugar bombs we have here in the US.
They are bland to me in that they don't have enough flavor, not that they don't have enough sugar. More cinnamon, or vanilla, or whatever the flavor is supposed to be. (I also don't generally like nut fillings in pastry)
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Old Aug 2, 15, 8:38 pm
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Originally Posted by bensyd View Post
+1.

Everything in America tastes sweet to me.
I find that generally true, but equally in places like New York and San Fran you can get utterly authentic food from almost any country in the world. I've never seen such a wide range from amazing food to basically inedible in one country.
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Old Aug 2, 15, 9:45 pm
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I think it might go back to early Thai restaurants in the USA having problems sourcing tamarind for the dish. So they'd substitute tomato ketchup to try to get roughly the same flavor profile, and if anyone complained about the ketchup, they'd say that, hey, it's a traditional SE Asian sauce and additive. Never mind that the original version of ketchup doesn't really resemble Euro-North American ketchup all that much. I also think that many North Americans go with the insanely hot spice level you can find in Thai food that helps balance out the sweet.

BamaVol- if you find yourself in Destin, I adore the massaman curry at Jasmine Thai over by Destin Fresh Market. I also don't think their pad thai is overly sweet- if I want a sweet noodle dish from there, I go with the pad kee maw.
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Old Aug 3, 15, 1:20 am
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Originally Posted by beachmouse View Post
BamaVol- if you find yourself in Destin, I adore the massaman curry at Jasmine Thai over by Destin Fresh Market. I also don't think their pad thai is overly sweet- if I want a sweet noodle dish from there, I go with the pad kee maw.
Maybe in the fall. A little too hectic this time of year. Any possibility it's related to Jasmine in PCB?
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Old Aug 3, 15, 6:15 am
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PF Chang and Pei Wei serve Americanized Chinese food. In case of other SE Asian cuisine, they serve a version which has been Chinesed and then Americanized; double whammy!

If you want Thai food, find a Thai restaurant.
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Old Aug 3, 15, 8:29 am
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Originally Posted by BamaVol View Post
Maybe in the fall. A little too hectic this time of year. Any possibility it's related to Jasmine in PCB?
I can understand the desire to avoid summer US 98 traffic all too well. Not sure about common ownership with the other Jasmine.
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Old Aug 3, 15, 8:52 am
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Maybe I'm just the odd one out but when I eat Asian food "sweet" is not a word that ever entered my mind. Bread--sweet? Huh?
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